British Iron Age

Iron AgeBritainIron Age Britainiron-ageCeltic BritainCelticBritishLate Iron Agepre-RomanPre-Roman Britain
The British Iron Age is a conventional name used in the archaeology of Great Britain, referring to the prehistoric and protohistoric phases of the Iron Age culture of the main island and the smaller islands, typically excluding prehistoric Ireland, which had an independent Iron Age culture of its own.wikipedia
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Roman Britain

RomanBritainBritannia
The Romanised culture is termed Roman Britain and is considered to supplant the British Iron Age. The Roman historian Tacitus suggested that the Britons were descended from people who had arrived from the continent, comparing the Caledonians (in modern-day Scotland) to their Germanic neighbours; the Silures of Southern Wales to Iberian settlers; and the inhabitants of Southeast Britannia to Gaulish tribes.
According to Caesar, the Britons had been overrun or culturally assimilated by other Celtic tribes during the British Iron Age and had been aiding Caesar's enemies.

Brittonic languages

BrythonicBrittonicBrythonic languages
The Brythonic languages spoken in Britain at this time, as well as others including the Goidelic and Gaulish languages of neighbouring Ireland and Gaul respectively, certainly belong to the group known as Celtic languages.
The Brittonic languages derive from the Common Brittonic language, spoken throughout Great Britain south of the Firth of Forth during the Iron Age and Roman period.

Broch

brochsRound Towerbroch village
Defensive structures dating from this time are often impressive, for example the brochs of Northern Scotland and the hill forts that dotted the rest of the islands.
A broch is an Iron Age drystone hollow-walled structure found in Scotland.

Cadbury Castle, Somerset

Cadbury CastleCadburyCaer Cadarn
Some of the most well-known hill forts include Maiden Castle, Dorset, Cadbury Castle, Somerset and Danebury, Hampshire.
Cadbury Castle, formerly known as Camalet, is a Bronze and Iron Age hillfort in the civil parish of South Cadbury in the English county of Somerset.

Silures

SiluriaSilurianSilure
The Roman historian Tacitus suggested that the Britons were descended from people who had arrived from the continent, comparing the Caledonians (in modern-day Scotland) to their Germanic neighbours; the Silures of Southern Wales to Iberian settlers; and the inhabitants of Southeast Britannia to Gaulish tribes.
The Silures were a powerful and warlike tribe or tribal confederation of ancient Britain, occupying what is now south east Wales and perhaps some adjoining areas.

Caledonians

CaledoniiCaledonianCaledonian Confederacy
The Roman historian Tacitus suggested that the Britons were descended from people who had arrived from the continent, comparing the Caledonians (in modern-day Scotland) to their Germanic neighbours; the Silures of Southern Wales to Iberian settlers; and the inhabitants of Southeast Britannia to Gaulish tribes.
The Caledonians (Caledones or Caledonii;, Kalēdōnes) or the Caledonian Confederacy were a Brittonic-speaking (Celtic) tribal confederacy in what is now Scotland during the Iron Age and Roman eras.

Roundhouse (dwelling)

roundhousesroundhouseround houses
On the other hand, they may have been only occupied intermittently as it is difficult to reconcile permanently occupied hill forts with the lowland farmsteads and their roundhouses found during the 20th century, such as at Little Woodbury and Rispain Camp.
Roundhouses were the standard form of housing built in Britain from the Bronze Age throughout the Iron Age, and in some areas well into the Sub Roman period.

Bath, Somerset

BathBath, EnglandCity of Bath
Wells and springs had female, divine links exemplified by the goddess Sulis worshipped at Bath.
Archaeological evidence shows that the site of the Roman baths' main spring may have been treated as a shrine by the Britons, and was dedicated to the goddess Sulis, whom the Romans identified with Minerva; the name Sulis continued to be used after the Roman invasion, appearing in the town's Roman name, Aquae Sulis (literally, "the waters of Sulis").

River Thames

ThamesThames Riverthe Thames
Numerous weapons have also been recovered from rivers, especially the Thames, but also the Trent and Tyne.
The marks of human activity, in some cases dating back to Pre-Roman Britain, are visible at various points along the river.

Anglesey

Isle of AngleseyYnys MônCounty of Anglesey
Weapons and horse trappings have been found in the bog at Llyn Cerrig Bach on Anglesey and are interpreted as votive offerings cast into a lake.
British Iron Age and Roman sites have been excavated and coins and ornaments discovered, especially by the 19th-century antiquarian William Owen Stanley.

Arras culture

Arras
Cremation was a common method of disposing of the dead, although the chariot burials and other inhumations of the Arras culture of East Yorkshire, and the cist burials of Cornwall, demonstrate that it was not ubiquitous.
The Arras culture is an archaeological culture of the Middle Iron Age in East Yorkshire, England.

Durotriges

Celtic tribeDurotrigian
In Dorset the Durotriges seem to have had small inhumation cemeteries, sometimes with high status grave goods.
The Durotriges were one of the Celtic tribes living in Britain prior to the Roman invasion.

Celtic Britons

BritonsBritishBrythonic
The Roman historian Tacitus suggested that the Britons were descended from people who had arrived from the continent, comparing the Caledonians (in modern-day Scotland) to their Germanic neighbours; the Silures of Southern Wales to Iberian settlers; and the inhabitants of Southeast Britannia to Gaulish tribes. Some hill forts continued as settlements for the newly conquered Britons. The British tribal kings also adopted the continental habit of putting their names on the coins they had minted, with such examples as Tasciovanus from Verulamium and Cunobelinos from Camulodunum identifying regional differentiation.
]]The Britons, also known as Celtic Britons or Ancient Britons, were Celtic people who inhabited Great Britain from at least the British Iron Age into the Middle Ages, at which point their culture and language diverged into the modern Welsh, Cornish and Bretons (among others).

Aylesford-Swarling pottery

Aylesford-SwarlingSwarling
In this case, it depends on the interpretation of Aylesford-Swarling pottery.
A cemetery of the British Iron Age discovered in 1886 at Aylesford in Kent was excavated under the leadership of Sir Arthur Evans, and published in 1890.

Camulodunum

ColchesterCamulodunonRoman Colchester
The British tribal kings also adopted the continental habit of putting their names on the coins they had minted, with such examples as Tasciovanus from Verulamium and Cunobelinos from Camulodunum identifying regional differentiation.
The earliest Iron Age defensive site at Colchester is the Pitchbury Ramparts earthwork north of the town between West Bergholt and Great Horkesley.

Corieltauvi

CoritaniCorieltaviCorieltauvi (or Coritani)
A large collection of coins, known as the Hallaton Treasure, was found at a Late Iron Age shrine near Hallaton, Leicestershire in 2000 and consisted of 5294 coins, mostly attributed to the Corieltavi tribe.
The Corieltauvi (formerly thought to be called the Coritani, and sometimes referred to as the Corieltavi) were a tribe of people living in Britain prior to the Roman conquest, and thereafter a civitas of Roman Britain.

Silsden Hoard

hoard of 27 gold coinsSilsden Roman treasure
Hoards of Iron Age coins include the Silsden Hoard in West Yorkshire found in 1998.
The Silsden Hoard is an assemblage containing 27 gold coins of late British Iron Age date and a Roman iron finger ring.

Maiden Castle, Dorset

Maiden CastleMaiden Castle Hill FortMai Dun
Some of the most well-known hill forts include Maiden Castle, Dorset, Cadbury Castle, Somerset and Danebury, Hampshire.

Danebury

Danbury hill fortDanebury Hill FortDanebury Hillfort
Some of the most well-known hill forts include Maiden Castle, Dorset, Cadbury Castle, Somerset and Danebury, Hampshire.

Iron Age tribes in Britain

Celtic British tribechieftainBritish tribes
Technically, the Iron Age had by this date finished, and we are into the Roman period.

Hengistbury Head

Hengistbury
Hengistbury Head in Dorset was the most important trading site and large quantities of Italian wine amphorae have been found there.
In Iron Age Britain around 700 BC, a settlement on the Head was established; also around this time, the headland was cut off from the mainland by the construction of two banks and ditches called the Double Dykes, similar to those found at Maiden Castle.

Celts

CelticCeltCeltic people
The tribes living in Britain during this time are often popularly considered to be part of a broadly Celtic culture, but in recent years this has been disputed.
All Celtic languages extant today belong to the Insular Celtic languages, derived from the Celtic languages spoken in Iron Age Britain and Ireland.

Butser Ancient Farm

In this latter capacity, it was designed so that archaeologists could learn more about the agricultural and domestic economy in Britain during the millennium that lasted from circa 400 BCE to 400 CE, in what was the Late British Iron Age and Romano-British periods.

Great Britain

BritishBritainGBR
The British Iron Age is a conventional name used in the archaeology of Great Britain, referring to the prehistoric and protohistoric phases of the Iron Age culture of the main island and the smaller islands, typically excluding prehistoric Ireland, which had an independent Iron Age culture of its own.