British Isles

BritainBritishThe British IslesBritain and IrelandislandBritain & IrelandUK and IrelandAtlantic IslesBritish IslandBritish Isle
The British Isles are a group of islands in the North Atlantic off the north-western coast of continental Europe that consist of the islands of Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man, the Hebrides and over six thousand smaller isles.wikipedia
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Great Britain

BritishBritainGBR
The British Isles are a group of islands in the North Atlantic off the north-western coast of continental Europe that consist of the islands of Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man, the Hebrides and over six thousand smaller isles.
With an area of 209,331 km2, it is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world.

Ireland

IrishIRLisland of Ireland
The British Isles are a group of islands in the North Atlantic off the north-western coast of continental Europe that consist of the islands of Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man, the Hebrides and over six thousand smaller isles.
Ireland is the second-largest island of the British Isles, the third-largest in Europe, and the twentieth-largest on Earth.

Ben Nevis

Nevisa mountain in ScotlandNevis
Ben Nevis rises to an elevation of only 1345 m, and Lough Neagh, which is notably larger than other lakes in the island group, covers 151 sqmi. The islands are at relatively low altitudes, with central Ireland and southern Great Britain particularly low-lying: the lowest point in the islands is the North Slob in County Wexford, Ireland, with an elevation of -3.0 m. The Scottish Highlands in the northern part of Great Britain are mountainous, with Ben Nevis being the highest point on the islands at 1345 m. Other mountainous areas include Wales and parts of Ireland, although only seven peaks in these areas reach above 1000 m. Lakes on the islands are generally not large, although Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland is an exception, covering 150 sqmi.
Ben Nevis (Beinn Nibheis, ; ) is the highest mountain in the British Isles.

Lough Neagh

L. NeaghNeaghLake Neagh
Ben Nevis rises to an elevation of only 1345 m, and Lough Neagh, which is notably larger than other lakes in the island group, covers 151 sqmi. The islands are at relatively low altitudes, with central Ireland and southern Great Britain particularly low-lying: the lowest point in the islands is the North Slob in County Wexford, Ireland, with an elevation of -3.0 m. The Scottish Highlands in the northern part of Great Britain are mountainous, with Ben Nevis being the highest point on the islands at 1345 m. Other mountainous areas include Wales and parts of Ireland, although only seven peaks in these areas reach above 1000 m. Lakes on the islands are generally not large, although Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland is an exception, covering 150 sqmi.
It is the largest lake by area in the British Isles, with a surface area of 392 km2.

Hebrides

HebrideanHebridean islandsHebrides Islands
The British Isles are a group of islands in the North Atlantic off the north-western coast of continental Europe that consist of the islands of Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man, the Hebrides and over six thousand smaller isles. The largest of the other islands are to be found in the Hebrides, Orkney and Shetland to the north, Anglesey and the Isle of Man between Great Britain and Ireland, and the Channel Islands near the coast of France.
Lewis and Harris is the largest island in Scotland and the third largest of the British Isles, after Great Britain and Ireland.

Angevin Empire

AngevinPlantagenet EmpireAngevins
The Norman conquest of England in 1066 and the later Angevin partial conquest of Ireland from 1169 led to the imposition of a new Norman ruling elite across much of Britain and parts of Ireland.
The Angevins of the House of Plantagenet ruled over an area covering roughly half of France, all of England, and parts of Ireland and Wales, and had further influence over much of the remaining British Isles.

British Isles naming dispute

the term British Isles is controversialAnglo-Celtic IslesAtlantic archipelago
The term "British Isles" is controversial in Ireland, where there are nationalist objections to its usage.
The toponym "British Isles" refers to a European archipelago consisting of Great Britain, Ireland and adjacent islands.

Vikings

VikingNorseDanes
Viking invasions began in the 9th century, followed by more permanent settlements and political change, particularly in England.
Anglo-Scandinavian is an academic term referring to the people, and archaeological and historical periods during the 8th to 13th centuries in which there was migration to—and occupation of—the British Isles by Scandinavian peoples generally known in English as Vikings.

Sark

Chief PleasChief Pleas of SarkGeography of Sark
The islands of Alderney, Jersey, Guernsey, and Sark, and their neighbouring smaller islands, are sometimes also taken to be part of the British Isles, even though, as islands off the coast of France, they do not form part of the archipelago.
This is because the British Isles were likely repopulated from the Iberian Peninsula following the last Ice Age.

Celtic Britons

BritonsBritishBrythonic
Hiberni (Ireland), Pictish (northern Britain) and Britons (southern Britain) tribes, all speaking Insular Celtic, inhabited the islands at the beginning of the 1st millennium AD.
The earliest known reference to the inhabitants of Britain seems to come from 4th-century BC records of the voyage of Pytheas, a Greek geographer who made a voyage of exploration around the British Isles between 330 and 320 BC.

Alderney

Alderney IslandLes EtacsAlderney's coat of arms
The islands of Alderney, Jersey, Guernsey, and Sark, and their neighbouring smaller islands, are sometimes also taken to be part of the British Isles, even though, as islands off the coast of France, they do not form part of the archipelago.
During the Second World War, the Channel Islands were the only part of the British Isles that was occupied by Germany, although other parts of the Empire were occupied by the Axis powers.

Shetland

Shetland IslandsShetland IslesShetlands
The largest of the other islands are to be found in the Hebrides, Orkney and Shetland to the north, Anglesey and the Isle of Man between Great Britain and Ireland, and the Channel Islands near the coast of France.
The largest island, known as "Mainland", has an area of 967 km2, making it the third-largest Scottish island and the fifth-largest of the British Isles.

Climate of the British Isles

The climate of the British Isles is mild, moist and changeable with abundant rainfall and a lack of temperature extremes.
The British Isles are an archipelago off the northwest coast of Europe, consisting of the islands of Great Britain and Ireland along with smaller surrounding ones.

Scottish Highlands

HighlandsHighlandHighlands of Scotland
The islands are at relatively low altitudes, with central Ireland and southern Great Britain particularly low-lying: the lowest point in the islands is the North Slob in County Wexford, Ireland, with an elevation of -3.0 m. The Scottish Highlands in the northern part of Great Britain are mountainous, with Ben Nevis being the highest point on the islands at 1345 m. Other mountainous areas include Wales and parts of Ireland, although only seven peaks in these areas reach above 1000 m. Lakes on the islands are generally not large, although Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland is an exception, covering 150 sqmi.
The area is very sparsely populated, with many mountain ranges dominating the region, and includes the highest mountain in the British Isles, Ben Nevis.

Loch Lomond

LomondLoch LomondsideLoch Lomond Rescue
The largest freshwater body in Great Britain (by area) is Loch Lomond at 27.5 sqmi, and Loch Ness, by volume whilst Loch Morar is the deepest freshwater body in the British Isles, with a maximum depth of 1017 ft. There are a number of major rivers within the British Isles.
In the British Isles as a whole there are several larger loughs in the Republic of Ireland.

Britannia

BritainBrittaniaBritania
The shift from the "P" of Pretannia to the "B" of Britannia by the Romans occurred during the time of Julius Caesar.
In the 1st century BC, Diodorus Siculus referred to Pretannia, a rendering of the indigenous name for the Pretani people whom the Greeks believed to inhabit the British Isles.

Loch Morar

North Morar
The largest freshwater body in Great Britain (by area) is Loch Lomond at 27.5 sqmi, and Loch Ness, by volume whilst Loch Morar is the deepest freshwater body in the British Isles, with a maximum depth of 1017 ft. There are a number of major rivers within the British Isles.
It is the fifth-largest loch by surface area in Scotland, at 26.7 km2, and the deepest freshwater body in the British Isles with a maximum depth of 1017 ft. The loch was created by glacial action around 10,000 years ago, and has a surface elevation of 9 m above sea level.

Channel Islands

Channel Islandthe Channel IslandsChannel Islanders
The largest of the other islands are to be found in the Hebrides, Orkney and Shetland to the north, Anglesey and the Isle of Man between Great Britain and Ireland, and the Channel Islands near the coast of France.
They were historically linked to the Duchy of Normandy, but they are part of the French territory along with continental Normandy, and not part of the British Isles or of the Channel Islands in a political sense.

Ulmus glabra

wych elmU. glabraUlmus campestris
Natural forests in Ireland are mainly oak, ash, wych elm, birch and pine.
The tree was by far the most common elm in the north and west of the British Isles and is now acknowledged as the only indisputably British native elm species.

Brittonic languages

BrythonicBrittonicBrythonic languages
The Insular Celtic languages of the Goidelic sub-group (Irish, Manx and Scottish Gaelic) and the Brittonic sub-group (Cornish, Welsh and Breton, spoken in north-western France) are the only remaining Celtic languages—the last of their continental relations were extinct before the 7th century.
The name Brittonic derives ultimately from the name Πρεττανική (Prettanike), recorded by Greek authors for the British Isles.

Low-pressure area

area of low pressurelow pressure arealow pressure
Most Atlantic depressions pass to the north of the islands; combined with the general westerly circulation and interactions with the landmass, this imposes a general east–west variation in climate.
In Europe (particularly in the British Isles and Netherlands), recurring low-pressure weather systems are typically known as "depressions".

Red grouse

grouseRedgrouse moor
Large birds are declining in number, except for those kept for game such as pheasant, partridge, and red grouse.
The red grouse is endemic to the British Isles; it has developed in isolation from other subspecies of the willow ptarmigan which are widespread in northern parts of Eurasia and North America.

Albion

AlbaAlbinaAlbinus
150 AD), he gave these islands the names Alwion, Iwernia, and Mona (the Isle of Man), suggesting these may have been names of the individual islands not known to him at the time of writing Almagest.
He calls both Albion and Ierne νῆσοι Βρεττανικαὶ (nēsoi Brettanikai, "British Isles").

England

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Since the 20th century there has been significant population movement to England, mostly from other parts of the British Isles, but also from the Commonwealth, particularly the Indian subcontinent.

Late Middle Ages

late medievallate medieval periodlate mediaeval
By the Late Middle Ages, Great Britain was separated into the Kingdom of England and Kingdom of Scotland, while control in Ireland fluxed between Gaelic kingdoms, Hiberno-Norman lords and the English-dominated Lordship of Ireland, soon restricted only to The Pale.
In the British Isles, plays were produced in some 127 different towns during the Middle Ages.