Broadcast network

Broadcastnetworkbroadcast networksbroadcasting networkChain Broadcastingterrestrial networkBroadcast television networkBroadcastingbroadcasting corporationnational broadcast network
A terrestrial network (or broadcast network in the United States) is a group of radio stations, television stations, or other electronic media outlets, that form an agreement to air, or broadcast, content from a centralized source.wikipedia
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Radio network

networkradioradio networks
Following the introduction of radio broadcasting in the early 1920s, the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T) developed the first radio network, linking together individual stations with specially prepared long-distance telephone lines in what at the time was called a "chain".
There are two types of radio network currently in use around the world: the one-to-many (simplex communication) broadcast network commonly used for public information and mass-media entertainment, and the two-way radio (duplex communication) type used more commonly for public safety and public services such as police, fire, taxicabs, and delivery services.

Television station

television stationsTV stationstation
A terrestrial network (or broadcast network in the United States) is a group of radio stations, television stations, or other electronic media outlets, that form an agreement to air, or broadcast, content from a centralized source.
They may be an independent station or part of a broadcasting network, or some other structure.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
The key station was AT&T's WEAF (now WFAN) in New York City.
The three major American broadcast networks are all headquartered in New York: ABC, CBS, and NBC.

Broadcasting

broadcastbroadcasterbroadcasters
A terrestrial network (or broadcast network in the United States) is a group of radio stations, television stations, or other electronic media outlets, that form an agreement to air, or broadcast, content from a centralized source.
The term "broadcast network" is often used to distinguish networks that broadcast an over-the-air television signals that can be received using a tuner (television) inside a television set with a television antenna from so-called networks that are broadcast only via cable television (cablecast) or satellite television that uses a dish antenna.

Federal Communications Commission

FCCU.S. Federal Communications CommissionFederal Communications Commission (FCC)
In 1941, the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) Report on Chain Broadcasting reviewed the alleged monopolistic practices of the radio networks.
In 1940, the Federal Communications Commission issued the "Report on Chain Broadcasting" which was led by new FCC chairman James Lawrence Fly (and Telford Taylor as general counsel).

CBS

CBS TelevisionColumbia Broadcasting SystemCBS-TV
He quickly turned the failing company around, which was named Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc. (CBS) in 1929.
CBS (an initialism of the network's former name, the Columbia Broadcasting System) is an American English language commercial broadcast television and radio network that is a flagship property of CBS Corporation.

Big Three television networks

Big ThreeBig Three networksbig three network
By the mid-1940s broadcasting had become a big Three television networks battle.
The prohibitive cost of starting a broadcast network, coupled with the difficulty of competing with the massive distribution of the Big Three networks, and the infancy and complexities of UHF broadcasting before cable television became commonplace in the 1980s, led to the downfall of almost all new network ventures; most media markets were limited to no more than three VHF channels, and even after the All-Channel Receiver Act was passed in 1961, the VHF stations were far more efficient and their signals could reach a greater range than their UHF counterparts.

New Yorkers in journalism

List of journalists in New York CityNew Yorkerbroadcast journalist

Television network

networknetwork televisionTV network
For example, PBS (USA), Global (Canada), and ITV (UK) are TV networks that provide programming for local terrestrial television station affiliates to air using signals that can be picked up by the home television sets of local viewers.
Until the mid-1980s, television programming in most countries of the world was dominated by a small number of terrestrial networks.

Television show

television seriestelevision programTV series
For example, PBS (USA), Global (Canada), and ITV (UK) are TV networks that provide programming for local terrestrial television station affiliates to air using signals that can be picked up by the home television sets of local viewers.
Until the 1980s, most (but certainly not all) new programs for the American broadcast networks debuted in the "fall season", which ran from September through March and nominally contained from 24 to 26 episodes.

Radio broadcasting

radio stationradio stationsstation
A terrestrial network (or broadcast network in the United States) is a group of radio stations, television stations, or other electronic media outlets, that form an agreement to air, or broadcast, content from a centralized source.

Electronic media

mediaelectronicelectronic communications
A terrestrial network (or broadcast network in the United States) is a group of radio stations, television stations, or other electronic media outlets, that form an agreement to air, or broadcast, content from a centralized source.

PBS

Public Broadcasting ServicePublic Broadcasting SystemPBS Television
For example, PBS (USA), Global (Canada), and ITV (UK) are TV networks that provide programming for local terrestrial television station affiliates to air using signals that can be picked up by the home television sets of local viewers.

Global Television Network

GlobalGlobal TVGlobal Television
For example, PBS (USA), Global (Canada), and ITV (UK) are TV networks that provide programming for local terrestrial television station affiliates to air using signals that can be picked up by the home television sets of local viewers.

ITV (TV network)

ITVITV NetworkIndependent Television
For example, PBS (USA), Global (Canada), and ITV (UK) are TV networks that provide programming for local terrestrial television station affiliates to air using signals that can be picked up by the home television sets of local viewers.

Terrestrial television

Broadcastover-the-airterrestrial
For example, PBS (USA), Global (Canada), and ITV (UK) are TV networks that provide programming for local terrestrial television station affiliates to air using signals that can be picked up by the home television sets of local viewers.

Network affiliate

affiliatedaffiliatemember
For example, PBS (USA), Global (Canada), and ITV (UK) are TV networks that provide programming for local terrestrial television station affiliates to air using signals that can be picked up by the home television sets of local viewers.

Streaming media

streamingstreamedstreaming video
Streaming media, Internet radio, and webcasting are sometimes considered forms of broadcasting despite the lack of terrestrial stations; its practitioners may also be called "broadcasters" or even "broadcast networks".

Internet radio

internet radio stationinternetonline
Streaming media, Internet radio, and webcasting are sometimes considered forms of broadcasting despite the lack of terrestrial stations; its practitioners may also be called "broadcasters" or even "broadcast networks".

Webcast

webcastingwebcastsinternet broadcasting
Streaming media, Internet radio, and webcasting are sometimes considered forms of broadcasting despite the lack of terrestrial stations; its practitioners may also be called "broadcasters" or even "broadcast networks".

Radio in the United States

AmericanradioAmerican radio
Following the introduction of radio broadcasting in the early 1920s, the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T) developed the first radio network, linking together individual stations with specially prepared long-distance telephone lines in what at the time was called a "chain".

AT&T Corporation

AT&TAmerican Telephone and Telegraph CompanyAmerican Telephone & Telegraph
Following the introduction of radio broadcasting in the early 1920s, the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T) developed the first radio network, linking together individual stations with specially prepared long-distance telephone lines in what at the time was called a "chain".

Telephone line

phone linelinetelephone cable
Following the introduction of radio broadcasting in the early 1920s, the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T) developed the first radio network, linking together individual stations with specially prepared long-distance telephone lines in what at the time was called a "chain".

WFAN (AM)

WFANWEAFWFAN-AM
The key station was AT&T's WEAF (now WFAN) in New York City.

Northeastern United States

NortheastNortheasternNortheast United States
In 1924, the Eveready Hour was broadcast over 12 stations, primarily located in the U.S. Northeast.