Broadway (Manhattan)

BroadwayGreat White WayCanyon of HeroesThe Great White WayBloomingdale RoadHeerestraat532 BroadwayBroad-WayLower Broadway120 Broadway
Not to be confused with East Broadway or West Broadway, both also in Manhattan, or with Broadway theatre, commonly referred to as "Broadway".wikipedia
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Bowling Green (New York City)

Bowling GreenBowling Green ParkBowling Green Plaza
Broadway runs from State Street at Bowling Green for 13 mi through the borough of Manhattan and 2 mi through the Bronx, exiting north from the city to run an additional 18 mi through the municipalities of Yonkers, Hastings-On-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Irvington, and Tarrytown, and terminating north of Sleepy Hollow in Westchester County.
Bowling Green is a small public park in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City, at the southern end of Broadway, next to the site of the original Dutch fort of New Amsterdam.

Broadway theatre

BroadwayBroadway musicalBroadway theater
Broadway in Manhattan is known widely as the heart of the American commercial theatrical industry, and is used as a metonym for it, as well as in the names of alternative theatrical ventures such as Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway.
Broadway theatre, also known simply as Broadway, refers to the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres, each with 500 or more seats, located in the Theater District and Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.

The Bronx

BronxBronx, New YorkThe Bronx, New York
Broadway runs from State Street at Bowling Green for 13 mi through the borough of Manhattan and 2 mi through the Bronx, exiting north from the city to run an additional 18 mi through the municipalities of Yonkers, Hastings-On-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Irvington, and Tarrytown, and terminating north of Sleepy Hollow in Westchester County.
The King's Bridge, built in 1693 where Broadway reached the Spuyten Duyvil Creek, was a possession of Frederick Philipse, lord of Philipse Manor.

Wall Street

WallWall Street (Manhattan)financial
In the 18th century, Broadway ended at the town commons north of Wall Street, where traffic continued up the East Side of the island via Eastern Post Road and the West Side via Bloomingdale Road.
Wall Street is an eight-block-long street running roughly northwest to southeast from Broadway to South Street, at the East River, in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan in New York City.

Off-Broadway

Off BroadwayOff-Broadway theatreoff
Broadway in Manhattan is known widely as the heart of the American commercial theatrical industry, and is used as a metonym for it, as well as in the names of alternative theatrical ventures such as Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway.
Originally referring to the location of a venue and its productions on a street intersecting Broadway in Manhattan's Theater District, the hub of the theatre industry in New York, the term later became defined by the League of Off-Broadway Theatres and Producers as a professional venue in Manhattan with a seating capacity between 100 and 499 (inclusive) or a specific production that appears in such a venue and adheres to related trade union and other contracts.

Columbus Circle

Columbus Circle, ManhattanGrand Circle
The western Bloomingdale Road would be widened and paved during the 19th century, and called "Western Boulevard" or "The Boulevard" north of the Grand Circle, now called Columbus Circle.
Columbus Circle is a traffic circle and heavily trafficked intersection in the New York City borough of Manhattan, located at the intersection of Eighth Avenue, Broadway, Central Park South (West 59th Street), and Central Park West, at the southwest corner of Central Park.

Times Square

Time SquareLongacre SquareNew York Times Square
None of Broadway became one-way, but the increased southbound traffic between Columbus Circle (Eighth Avenue) and Times Square (Seventh Avenue) caused the city to re-stripe that section of Broadway for four southbound and two northbound lanes. Since 2009, vehicular traffic has been banned at Times Square between 47th and 42nd Streets, and at Herald Square between 35th and 33rd Streets as part of a pilot program; the right-of-way is intact and reserved for cyclists and pedestrians.
Times Square is a major commercial intersection, tourist destination, entertainment center and neighborhood in the Midtown Manhattan section of New York City at the junction of Broadway and Seventh Avenue.

Washington Heights, Manhattan

Washington HeightsWashington Heights, New York City Washington Heights
An 1897 official map of the city shows a segment of what is now Broadway as "Kingsbridge Road" in the vicinity of Washington Heights.
The progress of the battle is marked by a series of bronze plaques along Broadway.

Madison Square and Madison Square Park

Madison SquareMadison Square ParkMadison Square Park Conservancy
Another change was made on November 10, 1963, when Broadway became one-way southbound from Herald Square to Madison Square (23rd Street) and Union Square (14th Street) to Canal Street, and two routes – Sixth Avenue south of Herald Square and Centre Street, Lafayette Street, and Fourth Avenue south of Union Square – became one-way northbound.
Madison Square is a public square formed by the intersection of Fifth Avenue and Broadway at 23rd Street in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

State Street (Manhattan)

State Street
Broadway runs from State Street at Bowling Green for 13 mi through the borough of Manhattan and 2 mi through the Bronx, exiting north from the city to run an additional 18 mi through the municipalities of Yonkers, Hastings-On-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Irvington, and Tarrytown, and terminating north of Sleepy Hollow in Westchester County.
Passing Pearl and Bridge Streets, it terminates at the northeast corner of the park, at Bowling Green, where the roadway continues north as Broadway and west as Battery Place.

Union Square, Manhattan

Union SquareUnion Square ParkUnion Square Greenmarket
Another change was made on November 10, 1963, when Broadway became one-way southbound from Herald Square to Madison Square (23rd Street) and Union Square (14th Street) to Canal Street, and two routes – Sixth Avenue south of Herald Square and Centre Street, Lafayette Street, and Fourth Avenue south of Union Square – became one-way northbound.
Union Square is a historic intersection and surrounding neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City, located where Broadway and the former Bowery Road – now Fourth Avenue – came together in the early 19th century.

Boston Post Road

Boston RoadPost RoadMiddle Post Road
In the 18th century, Broadway ended at the town commons north of Wall Street, where traffic continued up the East Side of the island via Eastern Post Road and the West Side via Bloomingdale Road.
Mileposts were measured from the intersection of Broadway and Wall Street in New York (one block west of Federal Hall) and from the old Boston city-line on Washington Street, near the present-day Massachusetts Turnpike.

14th Street (Manhattan)

14th StreetEast 14th StreetWest 14th Street
Another change was made on November 10, 1963, when Broadway became one-way southbound from Herald Square to Madison Square (23rd Street) and Union Square (14th Street) to Canal Street, and two routes – Sixth Avenue south of Herald Square and Centre Street, Lafayette Street, and Fourth Avenue south of Union Square – became one-way northbound.
At Broadway, 14th Street forms the southern boundary of Union Square.

West Side (Manhattan)

West SideManhattan's West SideWest Side of Manhattan
In the 18th century, Broadway ended at the town commons north of Wall Street, where traffic continued up the East Side of the island via Eastern Post Road and the West Side via Bloomingdale Road.
Fifth Avenue, Central Park, and lower Broadway separate it from the East Side.

U.S. Route 9 in New York

US 9U.S. Route 9US Route 9
U.S. 9 continues to be known as Broadway until its junction with NY 117.
It is Broadway in Upper Manhattan, the Bronx and much of Westchester County, and uses parts of the old Albany Post Road in the Hudson Valley, where it passes the historic homes of a U.S. President (Franklin Delano Roosevelt) and Gilded Age heir.

Manhattan

Manhattan, New YorkManhattan, New York CityNew York
Broadway runs from State Street at Bowling Green for 13 mi through the borough of Manhattan and 2 mi through the Bronx, exiting north from the city to run an additional 18 mi through the municipalities of Yonkers, Hastings-On-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Irvington, and Tarrytown, and terminating north of Sleepy Hollow in Westchester County.
Points of interest on Manhattan Island include the American Museum of Natural History, Broadway and the Theater District, Bryant Park, Central Park, Chinatown, the Chrysler Building, Columbia University, the Empire State Building, Flatiron Building, Fulton Center, Grand Central Terminal, Harlem and Spanish Harlem, the High Line, Koreatown, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Little Italy, Madison Square Garden, Museum Mile on Fifth Avenue, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the New York Stock Exchange on Wall Street, New York University and the Washington Square Arch in Greenwich Village, Penn Station, Port Authority Bus Terminal, Rockefeller Center (including Radio City Music Hall), South Street Seaport, Stonewall Inn, The Battery, Times Square, Trump Tower, World Trade Center, including the National September 11 Museum and One World Trade Center.

Greenwich Village

Greenwich Village, New YorkGreenwich Village Historic DistrictGreenwich Village, Manhattan
Broadway marks the boundary between Greenwich Village to the west and the East Village to the east, passing Astor Place.
Broadly, Greenwich Village is bounded by 14th Street to the north, Broadway to the east, Houston Street to the south, and the Hudson River to the west.

Tribeca

Lower West SideTribeca, ManhattanTribeca, New York
West of Broadway, as far as Canal Street, was the city's fashionable residential area until circa 1825; landfill has more than tripled the area, and the Hudson River shore now lies far to the west, beyond Tribeca and Battery Park City.
The "triangle", or more accurately, a trapezoid, is bounded by Canal Street, West Street, Broadway, and Chambers Street.

Verdi Square

Needle Park
In 2001, a one-block section of Broadway between 72nd Street and 73rd Street at Verdi Square was reconfigured.
Verdi Square is a small triangle of land enclosed by a railing, located on Manhattan's Upper West Side, between 72nd Street and 73rd Street on the south and north, and Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue on the west and east.

72nd Street station (IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line)

72nd Street72nd72nd Street (IRT)
Its easternmost lanes, which formerly hosted northbound traffic, were turned into a public park when a new subway entrance for the 72nd Street station was built in the exact location of these lanes.
72nd Street is an express station on the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line of the New York City Subway, located at the intersection of Broadway, 72nd Street and Amsterdam Avenue (including Verdi Square and Sherman Square) on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.

42nd Street (Manhattan)

42nd StreetWest 42nd Street42nd
Since 2009, vehicular traffic has been banned at Times Square between 47th and 42nd Streets, and at Herald Square between 35th and 33rd Streets as part of a pilot program; the right-of-way is intact and reserved for cyclists and pedestrians.
The street is known for its theaters, especially near the intersection with Broadway at Times Square, and as such is also the name of the region of the theater district (and, at times, the red-light district) near that intersection.

Tenth Avenue (Manhattan)

Amsterdam AvenueTenth Avenue10th Avenue
Northbound traffic on Broadway is now channeled onto Amsterdam Avenue to 73rd Street, makes a left turn on the three-lane 73rd Street, and then a right turn on Broadway shortly afterward.
On the north side of Highbridge Park, unconnected to Amsterdam Avenue on the south side, Tenth Avenue then runs for slightly less than a mile from the northern terminus of the Harlem River Drive at Dyckman Street, to the intersection of West 218th Street where it merges into Broadway.

Midtown Manhattan

MidtownEast MidtownMidtown East
Because Broadway preceded the grid that the Commissioners' Plan of 1811 imposed on the island, Broadway crosses midtown Manhattan diagonally, intersecting with both the east-west streets and north-south avenues.
Midtown is home to some of the city's most iconic buildings, including the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, the Hudson Yards Redevelopment Project, the headquarters of the United Nations, Grand Central Terminal, and Rockefeller Center, as well as Broadway and Times Square.

Herald Square

Greeley SquareNew York Herald BuildingHerald
Since 2009, vehicular traffic has been banned at Times Square between 47th and 42nd Streets, and at Herald Square between 35th and 33rd Streets as part of a pilot program; the right-of-way is intact and reserved for cyclists and pedestrians. Broadway became one-way from Columbus Circle south to Herald Square (34th Street) on March 10, 1957, in conjunction with Sixth Avenue becoming one-way from Herald Square north to 59th Street and Seventh Avenue becoming one-way from 59th Street south to Times Square (where it crosses Broadway).
Herald Square is formed by the intersection of Broadway, Sixth Avenue (officially named Avenue of the Americas), and 34th Street in the borough of Manhattan in New York City.

Grace Church (Manhattan)

Grace ChurchGrace Episcopal ChurchGrace Church, New York
A bend in front of Grace Church allegedly avoids an earlier tavern; from 10th Street it begins its long diagonal course across Manhattan, headed almost due north.
The church is located at 800-804 Broadway, at the corner of East 10th Street, where Broadway bends to the south-southeast, bringing it in alignment with the avenues in Manhattan's grid.