Broadway theatre

BroadwayBroadway musicalBroadway theaterBroadway musicalsBroadway showBroadway showsBroadway productionBroadway stageBroadway playBroadway debut
Broadway theatre, also known simply as Broadway, refers to the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres, each with 500 or more seats, located in the Theater District and Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.wikipedia
12,531 Related Articles

West End theatre

West EndLondonLondon's West End
Broadway, together with London's West End, represent the highest commercial level of live theater in the English-speaking world.
Along with New York City's Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in the English-speaking world.

Theater District, Manhattan

Theater DistrictBroadway Theater DistrictBroadway
Broadway theatre, also known simply as Broadway, refers to the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres, each with 500 or more seats, located in the Theater District and Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.
New York City's Theater District (sometimes spelled Theatre District, and officially zoned as the "Theater Subdistrict" ) is an area in Midtown Manhattan where most Broadway theaters are located, as well as many other theaters, movie theaters, restaurants, hotels, and other places of entertainment.

The Broadway League

League of American Theatres and ProducersBroadway LeagueBroadway on Broadway
According to The Broadway League, for the 2018–2019 season (which ended May 26, 2019) total attendance was 14,768,254 and Broadway shows had US$1,829,312,140 in grosses, with attendance up 9.5%, grosses up 10.3%, and playing weeks up 9.3%.
The Broadway League, formerly the League of American Theatres and Producers and League of New York Theatres and Producers, is the national trade association for the Broadway theatre industry based in New York, New York.

Broadway (Manhattan)

BroadwayGreat White WayCanyon of Heroes
Broadway theatre, also known simply as Broadway, refers to the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres, each with 500 or more seats, located in the Theater District and Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.
Broadway in Manhattan is known widely as the heart of the American commercial theatrical industry, and is used as a metonym for it, as well as in the names of alternative theatrical ventures such as Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway.

Musical theatre

musicalmusicalsmusical comedy
The majority of Broadway shows are musicals.
They may be presented in large venues, such as big-budget Broadway or West End productions in New York City or London.

Tourism in New York City

tourismtouristsNew York City Tourism
The Theater District is a popular tourist attraction in New York City.
Major destinations include the Empire State Building, Ellis Island, the Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island, Broadway theatre productions, Central Park, Times Square, Coney Island, the Financial District, museums, and sports stadiums.

Richard Rodgers

RodgersA Ship Without a SailR. Rodgers
Historian Martin Shefter argues that "'Broadway musicals', culminating in the productions of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, became enormously influential forms of American popular culture" and contributed to making New York City the cultural capital of the Western Hemisphere.
Rodgers was influenced by composers such as Victor Herbert and Jerome Kern, as well as by the operettas his parents took him to see on Broadway when he was a child.

Winter Garden Theatre

Winter Garden TheaterWinter GardenWinter Garden Theatre (1850)
Booth played the role for a famous 100 consecutive performances at the Winter Garden Theatre in 1865 (with the run ending just a few months before Booth's brother John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln), and would later revive the role at his own Booth's Theatre (which was managed for a time by his brother Junius Brutus Booth, Jr.).
The Winter Garden Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 1634 Broadway between 50th and 51st Streets in midtown Manhattan.

Times Square

Time SquareLongacre SquareNew York Times Square
Theatres did not arrive in the Times Square area until the early 1900s, and the Broadway theatres did not consolidate there until a large number of theatres were built around the square in the 1920s and 1930s.
One of the world's busiest pedestrian areas, it is also the hub of the Broadway Theater District and a major center of the world's entertainment industry.

Palmo's Opera House

Burton's TheatreChambers Street Theatre
In 1844, Palmo's Opera House opened and presented opera for only four seasons before bankruptcy led to its rebranding as a venue for plays under the name Burton's Theatre.
It was one of the earliest opera houses in New York before it was converted into one of the earliest Broadway theatres.

Fay Templeton

They starred high quality singers (Lillian Russell, Vivienne Segal, and Fay Templeton), instead of the women of questionable repute who had starred in earlier musical forms.
Her parents were actors/vaudevillians and she followed in their footsteps, making her Broadway debut in 1900.

Culture of the United States

American cultureAmerican popular cultureAmerican
Historian Martin Shefter argues that "'Broadway musicals', culminating in the productions of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, became enormously influential forms of American popular culture" and contributed to making New York City the cultural capital of the Western Hemisphere.
Broadway is one of the largest theater communities in the world and is the epicenter of American commercial theater.

The Black Crook

Black Crook
The first theatre piece that conforms to the modern conception of a musical, adding dance and original music that helped to tell the story, is considered to be The Black Crook, which premiered in New York on September 12, 1866.
It opened on September 12, 1866 at the 3,200-seat Niblo's Garden on Broadway, in New York City, and ran for a record-breaking 474 performances.

Oscar Hammerstein II

Oscar HammersteinHammersteinHammerstein II
Historian Martin Shefter argues that "'Broadway musicals', culminating in the productions of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, became enormously influential forms of American popular culture" and contributed to making New York City the cultural capital of the Western Hemisphere.
It opened on Broadway in 1920.

Off-Broadway

Off BroadwayOff-Broadway theatreoff
However, smaller vaudeville and variety houses proliferated, and Off-Broadway was well established by the end of the 19th century.
These theatres are smaller than Broadway theatres, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway theatres, which seat fewer than 100.

In Dahomey

Walker and Williams in Dahomey
A Trip to Coontown (1898) was the first musical comedy entirely produced and performed by African Americans in a Broadway theatre (largely inspired by the routines of the minstrel shows), followed by the ragtime-tinged Clorindy: The Origin of the Cakewalk (1898), and the highly successful In Dahomey (1902).
In Dahomey: A Negro Musical Comedy is a landmark 1903 American musical comedy described by theatre historian Gerald Bordman as "the first full-length musical written and played by blacks to be performed at a major Broadway house."

Irene (musical)

IreneIrene'' (musical)stage musical of the same name
This would not be surpassed until Irene in 1919.
The musical opened on Broadway in 1919 and ran for 675 performances, at the time the record for the longest-running musical in Broadway history, which it maintained for nearly two decades.

Victor Herbert

HerbertA Victor Herbert Showcasetitle character
Victor Herbert, whose work included some intimate musical plays with modern settings as well as his string of famous operettas (The Fortune Teller (1898), Babes in Toyland (1903), Mlle. Modiste (1905), The Red Mill (1906), and Naughty Marietta (1910)).
Although Herbert enjoyed important careers as a cello soloist and conductor, he is best known for composing many successful operettas that premiered on Broadway from the 1890s to World War I. He was also prominent among the tin pan alley composers and was later a founder of the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP).

Florodora

Florodora girlFlorodora girlsFlorodora Company
A few very successful British musicals continued to achieve great success in New York, including Florodora in 1900–01.
After its long run in London, it became one of the first successful Broadway musicals of the 20th century.

P. G. Wodehouse

P.G. WodehouseWodehousePG Wodehouse
In the early years of the 20th century, translations of popular late-19th century continental operettas were joined by the "Princess Theatre" shows of the 1910s by writers such as P. G. Wodehouse, Guy Bolton, and Harry B. Smith.
He wrote a series of Broadway musical comedies during and after the First World War, together with Guy Bolton and Jerome Kern, that played an important part in the development of the American musical.

42nd Street (Manhattan)

42nd StreetWest 42nd Street42nd
In 1836, Mayor Cornelius Lawrence opened 42nd Street and invited Manhattanites to "enjoy the pure clean air."
Lloyd Bacon and Busby Berkeley's 1933 film musical 42nd Street, starring 30s heartthrobs Dick Powell and Ruby Keeler, displays the bawdy and colorful mixture of Broadway denizens and lowlifes in Manhattan during the Depression.

A Trip to Chinatown

hit Broadway musical of the same name
Charles H. Hoyt's A Trip to Chinatown (1891) became Broadway's long-run champion, holding the stage for 657 performances.
After almost a year of touring, the musical opened at Broadway’s Madison Square Theater on November 9, 1891, and ran for 657 performances, or just short of two years.

Shubert family

Shubert brothersShubertsShubert
By the 1920s, the Shubert Brothers had risen to take over the majority of the theatres from the Erlanger syndicate.
The Shubert family was responsible for the establishment of the Broadway district, in New York City, as the hub of the theatre industry in the United States.

Florenz Ziegfeld Jr.

Florenz ZiegfeldFlorenz Ziegfeld, Jr.Flo Ziegfeld
Florenz Ziegfeld produced annual spectacular song-and-dance revues on Broadway featuring extravagant sets and elaborate costumes, but there was little to tie the various numbers together.
Florenz Edward Ziegfeld Jr. (March 21, 1867 – July 22, 1932), popularly known as Flo Ziegfeld, was an American Broadway impresario, notable for his series of theatrical revues, the Ziegfeld Follies (1907–1931), inspired by the Folies Bergère of Paris.

Culture of New York City

culturalNew York City Department of Cultural AffairsNew York Theater
Historian Martin Shefter argues that "'Broadway musicals', culminating in the productions of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, became enormously influential forms of American popular culture" and contributed to making New York City the cultural capital of the Western Hemisphere.
Today the 39 largest theatres (with more than 500 seats) in New York are collectively known as "Broadway" after the major thoroughfare through the Theater District, and are mostly located in the Times Square vicinity.