A report on Brooklyn and New York University

A dining table from the Dutch village of Brooklyn, c. 1664, in The Brooklyn Museum
Albert Gallatin (1761–1849) by Gilbert Stuart
Village of Brooklyn and environs, 1766
NYU Building in Washington Square, 1850
The Battle of Long Island was fought across Kings County.
The University Heights campus, now home to Bronx Community College
Winter Scene in Brooklyn, c. 1819–20, by Francis Guy (Brooklyn Museum)
Washington Square Park, with its gateway arch, is surrounded largely by NYU buildings and plays an integral role in the university's campus life.
Brooklyn Bridge in 1883, by Currier and Ives
Bobst Library
Currier and Ives print of Brooklyn, 1886
Bern Dibner Library of Science and Technology on the Brooklyn campus
Brooklyn in 1897
NYU Langone Health
Location of Brooklyn (red) within New York City (remainder yellow)
NYU Abu Dhabi
Landmark 19th-century rowhouses on tree-lined Kent Street in Greenpoint Historic District
NYU Shanghai
Park Slope
Washington Square Village, home to NYU faculty and graduate students
150–159 Willow Street, three original red-brick early 19th-century Federal Style houses in Brooklyn Heights
A bus system transports students to and from the far ends of campus.
Imatra Society, consisting of Finnish immigrants, celebrating its summer festival in Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn in 1894.
Jack Dorsey, American billionaire and internet entrepreneur, founder and CEO of Twitter and Square, Inc.; CAS (dropped out)
The Brooklyn Museum on Eastern Parkway
Robert Muller III, American public official; lead director of the Special Counsel investigation, author of the Mueller Report, former Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation; GSAS '67
Brooklyn Botanic Garden
Alan Greenspan, American economist and public official; former long-time Chairman of the Federal Reserve; Stern '48, '50, '77
The Soldiers' and Sailors' Arch at Grand Army Plaza
Carol Bellamy, American politician; former executive director of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF); Law '68
The USS North Carolina, launched at Brooklyn Navy Yard, June 1940
Ma Ying-jeou, Taiwanese politician; Former President of the Republic of China; Law '76
Newer buildings near East River State Park
Jonas Salk, American biologist; creator of the polio vaccine; founder of the Salk Institute; Medicine '39
Kwanzan Cherries in bloom at Brooklyn Botanic Garden.
Martin Scorsese, American filmmaker, director and actor; AFI Life Achievement Award winner, 20-time Academy Award winner, 23-time BAFTA winner, 11-time Golden Globes winner; CAS '64, Steinhardt '68
Astroland in Coney Island.
Spike Lee, American filmmaker, director and producer; two-time Academy Award winner; two-time Emmy Award winner; Tisch '83
Barclays Center in Pacific Park within Prospect Heights, home of the Nets and Liberty.
Ang Lee OBS, Taiwanese film director; three-time Academy Award winner; two-time Golden Lion winner; Tisch '83
Brooklyn Borough Hall
Alan Menken, American composer, songwriter, and record producer; one of only sixteen people to have won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy, and a Tony; Steinhart '71
Brooklyn Tech as seen from Ashland Place in Fort Greene
Suzanne Collins, American television writer and author; Author of The New York Times best-selling series The Underland Chronicles and The Hunger Games trilogy; Tisch '89
The Brooklyn College library, part of the original campus laid out by Randolph Evans, now known as "East Quad"
Alec Baldwin, American actor, writer, comedian and philanthropist; three-time Emmy Award winner; three-time Golden Globe winner; Tisch '94
Brooklyn Law School's 1994 new classical "Fell Hall" tower, by architect Robert A. M. Stern
Lady Gaga, American singer, songwriter, and actress; nine-time Grammy Award winner; thirteen-time MTV Video Music Award winner; Tisch (dropped out)
NYU Tandon Wunsch Building
Angelina Jolie, American actress and humanitarian; three-time Golden Globe Award winner; Special Envoy to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees; Tisch (non-degree seeking)
St. Francis College Administration Building
Mahershala Ali, American actor; two-time Academy Award winner; Golden Globe Award winner; three-time Screen Actors Guild Award winner; Tisch '00
The Central Library at Grand Army Plaza.
Woody Allen, American director, actor and comedian; four-time Academy Award winner; nine-time BAFTA Award winner; Tisch (dropped out)
Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue subway station
Adam Sandler, American actor, director and comedian; five-time MTV Movie & TV Award winner; eight-time People's Choice Award winner; Tisch '88
Atlantic Terminal is a major hub in Brooklyn
Donald Glover, American actor, comedian, screenwriter, and singer; two-time Golden Globe Award winner; five-time Grammy Award winner; Tisch '06
The Marine Parkway Bridge
Anne Hathaway, American actress; Academy Award and Golden Globe Award winner; Gallatin (dropped out)
Williamsburg Bridge, as seen from Wallabout Bay with Greenpoint and Long Island City in background
Tom Ford, American fashion designer and filmmaker; former creative director at Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent; CAS (dropped out)

Since then, the university has added an engineering school in Brooklyn's MetroTech Center and graduate schools throughout Manhattan.

- New York University

NYU-Tandon is one of the 18 schools and colleges that comprise New York University (NYU).

- Brooklyn

5 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Manhattan

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Most densely populated and geographically smallest of the five boroughs of New York City.

Most densely populated and geographically smallest of the five boroughs of New York City.

Peter Minuit, early 1600s
Pieter Schaghen's 1626 letter saying Manhattan was purchased for 60 guilders.
The Castello Plan showing the Dutch city of New Amsterdam in 1660, at the southern tip of Manhattan
Washington's statue in front of Federal Hall on Wall Street, where in 1789 he was sworn in as first U.S. president
Manhattan in 1873. The Brooklyn Bridge was under construction from 1870 until 1883
The "Sanitary & Topographical Map of the City and Island of New York", commonly known as the Viele Map, was created by Egbert Ludovicus Viele in 1865
Manhattan's Little Italy, Lower East Side, circa 1900
Manhattan personified, early 20th century
V-J Day in Times Square in Times Square, 1945
Flooding on Avenue C caused by Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012
Satellite image of Manhattan Island, bounded by the Hudson River to the west, the Harlem River to the north, the East River to the east, and New York Harbor to the south, with rectangular Central Park prominently visible. Roosevelt Island, in the East River, belongs to Manhattan.
Location of Manhattan (red) within New York City (remainder yellow)
Manhattan schist outcropping in Central Park
Liberty Island is an exclave of Manhattan, of New York City, and of New York State, that is surrounded by New Jersey waters
The Empire State Building in the foreground looking southward from the top of Rockefeller Center, with One World Trade Center in the background, at sunset. The Midtown South Community Council acts as a civic caretaker for much of the neighborhood between the skyscrapers of Midtown and Lower Manhattan.
Central Park in autumn
The Estonian House, the main center of Estonian culture amongst Estonian Americans
A. T. Stewart in 1870, 9th Street, Manhattan
Many tall buildings have setbacks on their facade due to the 1916 Zoning Resolution. This is exemplified at Park Avenue and 57th Street in Midtown Manhattan.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018.
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan, seen from Brooklyn
The Flatiron District is the center and birthplace of Silicon Alley
Times Square is the hub of the Broadway theater district and a major cultural venue in Manhattan, it also has one of the highest annual attendance rates of any tourist attraction in the world, estimated at 50 million
The New York Times headquarters, 620 Eighth Avenue
Butler Library at Columbia University, with its notable architectural design
Stuyvesant High School, in Tribeca
New York Public Library Main Branch at 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
The scene at Manhattan's 2015 LGBT Pride March. The annual event rivals the sister São Paulo event as the world's largest pride parade, attracting tens of thousands of participants and millions of sidewalk spectators each June.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Madison Square Garden is home to the Rangers and Knicks, and hosts some Liberty games
The Skating Pond in Central Park, 1862
Manhattan Municipal Building
James Farley Post Office
A slum tour through the Five Points in an 1885 sketch
Tenement houses in 1936
At the time of its construction, London Terrace in Chelsea was the largest apartment building in the world
Grand Central Terminal is a National Historic Landmark.
Ferries departing Battery Park City and helicopters flying above Manhattan
The Staten Island Ferry, seen from the Battery, crosses Upper New York Bay, providing free public transportation between Staten Island and Manhattan.
The Brooklyn Bridge to the right and the Manhattan Bridge towards the left, are two of the three bridges that connect Lower Manhattan with Brooklyn over the East River.
Eighth Avenue, looking northward ("Uptown"), in the rain; most streets and avenues in Manhattan's grid plan incorporate a one-way traffic configuration
Tourists looking westward at sunset to observe the July 12, 2016 Manhattanhenge
Ferry service departing Battery Park City towards New Jersey, see from Paulus Hook

Manhattan has the third-largest population of New York City's five boroughs, after Brooklyn and Queens, and is the smallest borough in terms of land area.

Numerous colleges and universities are located in Manhattan, including Columbia University, New York University, Cornell Tech, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Rockefeller University, which have been ranked among the top 40 in the world.

New York City

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Most populous city in the United States.

Most populous city in the United States.

New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it "New York"
Fort George and the City of New York c. 1731. Royal Navy ships of the line are seen guarding what would become New York Harbor.
Columbia University was founded by royal charter in 1754 under the name of King's College.
The Battle of Long Island, the largest battle of the American Revolution, took place in Brooklyn in 1776.
Broadway follows the Native American Wickquasgeck Trail through Manhattan.
The current 5 boroughs of Greater New York as they appeared in 1814. Bronx was in Westchester County, Queens County included modern Nassau County, Kings County had 6 towns, one of which was Brooklyn, New York City is shown by hatching in southern New York County on the island of Manhattan, and Richmond County on Staten Island.
A construction worker atop the Empire State Building as it was being built in 1930. The Chrysler Building is behind him.
Manhattan's Little Italy, Lower East Side, circa 1900
The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement
United Airlines Flight 175 hits the South Tower of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
The core of the New York City metropolitan area, with Manhattan Island at its center
Lower and Midtown Manhattan, as seen by a SkySat satellite in 2017
Central Park in Winter by Raymond Speers, in Munsey's Magazine, February 1900
Flushing Meadows–Corona Park was used in both the 1939 and 1964 New York World's Fair, with the Unisphere as the centerpiece of the latter and which remains today.
The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island in New York Harbor is a symbol of the United States and its ideals of freedom, democracy, and opportunity.
View of The Pond and Midtown Manhattan from the Gapstow Bridge in Central Park, one of the world's most visited tourist attractions, in 2019
California sea lions play at the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
A map of racial distribution in New York, 2010 U.S. census. Each dot is 25 people:
The landmark Neo-Gothic Roman Catholic St. Patrick's Cathedral, Midtown Manhattan
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents in Brooklyn. Brooklyn has the largest Jewish community in the United States, with approximately 600,000 individuals.
The Islamic Cultural Center of New York in Upper Manhattan was the first mosque built in New York City.
Ganesh Temple in Flushing, Queens, is the oldest Hindu temple in the Western Hemisphere.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018. Pictured is the exchange's building on Wall Street.
The Deutsche Bank Center as viewed from Central Park West
Times Square is the hub of the Broadway theater district and a media center. It also has one of the highest annual attendance rates of any tourist attraction in the world, estimated at 50 million.
The I Love New York logo, designed by Milton Glaser in 1977
Rockefeller Center is home to NBC Studios.
Times Square Studios, home of Good Morning America
Butler Library at Columbia University, described as one of the most beautiful college libraries in the United States
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of both New York University (NYU) and its Greenwich Village neighborhood
New York-Presbyterian Hospital, affiliated with Columbia University and Cornell University, the largest hospital and largest private employer in New York City and one of the world's busiest
The New York Police Department (NYPD) is the largest police force in the United States.
Police officers of New York Police Department (NYPD)
The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) is the largest municipal fire department in the United States.
The Stephen A. Schwarzman Headquarters Building of the New York Public Library, at 5th Avenue and 42nd Street
The fast-paced streets of New York City, January 2020
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, part of Museum Mile, is one of the largest museums in the world.
Smorgasburg opened in 2011 as an open-air food market and is part of the Brooklyn Flea.
As of 2012, the city had about 6,000 hybrid taxis (shown) in service, the largest number of any city in North America.
New York City Hall is the oldest City Hall in the United States that still houses its original governmental functions.
The New York County Courthouse houses the New York Supreme Court and other offices.
Eric Adams, the current and 110th Mayor of New York City
New York City is home to the two busiest train stations in the U.S., including Grand Central Terminal.
The New York City Subway is the world's largest rapid transit system by number of stations.
The Port Authority Bus Terminal, the world's busiest bus station, at 8th Avenue and 42nd Street
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States
The Staten Island Ferry shuttles commuters between Manhattan and Staten Island.
Yellow medallion taxicabs are widely recognized icons of the city.
8th Avenue, looking northward ("uptown"). Most streets and avenues in Manhattan's grid plan incorporate a one-way traffic configuration.
The George Washington Bridge, connecting Upper Manhattan (background) from Fort Lee, New Jersey across the Hudson River, is the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge.
The growing skyline of Long Island City, Queens (background),<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-30/nyc-s-fastest-growing-neighborhood-gets-180-million-investment|title=NYC's Fastest-Growing Neighborhood Gets $180 Million Investment|first=Henry|last=Goldman|date=October 30, 2018|publisher=Bloomberg L.P|access-date=October 30, 2018}}</ref> facing the East River and Manhattan in May 2017
The Grand Concourse in the Bronx, foreground, with Manhattan in the background in February 2018
St. George, Staten Island as seen from the Staten Island Ferry, the world's busiest passenger-only ferry system, shuttling passengers between Manhattan and Staten Island
The Asia gate entrance to the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
The Spanish Harlem Orchestra. New York City is home to nearly 3 million Latino Americans, the largest Hispanic population of any city outside Latin America and Spain.
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan including Wall Street, the world's principal financial center

The five boroughs—Brooklyn (Kings County), Queens (Queens County), Manhattan (New York County), the Bronx (Bronx County), and Staten Island (Richmond County)—were created when local governments were consolidated into a single municipal entity in 1898.

The city has over 120 colleges and universities, including Columbia University, New York University, and the City University of New York system, which is the largest urban public university system in the United States.

New York metropolitan area

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Largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass, at 4669.0 mi2, and one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world.

Largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass, at 4669.0 mi2, and one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world.

Map of the counties in the four divisions of the New York Metropolitan Area
Nocturnal view of the New York City metropolitan area, the world's most brightly illuminated conurbation and largest urban landmass. Long Island extends 120 miles eastward from Manhattan, the central core of the conurbation.
Part of the Palisades Interstate Park, the cliffs of the New Jersey Palisades of Bergen County overlook the Hudson River as well as The Bronx and Upper Manhattan in New York.
Enveloped by the Atlantic Ocean and Long Island Sound, New York City and Long Island alone are home to approximately 11 million residents conjointly.
The Bear Mountain Bridge connecting Westchester and Orange Counties, New York, across the Hudson River, as seen from Bear Mountain
High Point Monument as seen from Lake Marcia at High Point, Sussex County, the highest elevation in New Jersey at 1803 ft above sea level.
The Village of Garden City in Nassau County, Long Island's Town of Hempstead, which with over 770,000 people is the New York metropolitan area's most populous individual municipality outside New York City.
Westhampton, Suffolk County, New York, on the East End of Long Island, December 2008
The Great Falls of the Passaic River in Paterson, Passaic County, New Jersey, dedicated as a National Historical Park in November 2011, incorporates one of the largest waterfalls in the eastern United States.
Downtown Trenton in Mercer County, including the New Jersey State House topped by its golden dome, alongside the Delaware River
Downtown New Brunswick, Middlesex County, New Jersey, an educational and cultural district undergoing gentrification
The Mohonk Mountain House, Ulster County, New York, in the Hudson Valley, was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1986.
Sugarloaf Hill in Putnam County, New York, in the Hudson Valley
A deer in a suburban street (Highland Park, Middlesex County, NJ)
Mohawk Mountain Ski Area, Cornwall, Litchfield County, Connecticut, in the Berkshire Mountains
Dingmans Falls in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, Pike County, northeastern Pennsylvania
Downtown Stamford in Fairfield County, Connecticut
The New Haven Green Historic District in Connecticut was designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1970.
Aerial view of Newark, Essex County, New Jersey's most populous city
Public Library in Yonkers, Westchester County, New York
Barnum Museum in Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Connecticut's most populous city
Paterson, Passaic County, New Jersey, known as the "Silk City", seen here from Garret Mountain Reservation, is a prime destination for a diverse pool of international immigrants.
Peter Minuit is credited with the purchase of the island of Manhattan in 1626.
New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it New York
Little Italy, Lower East Side, Manhattan, circa 1900.
The United Nations Headquarters, established in Midtown Manhattan in 1952
Liberty Enlightening the World, known as the Statue of Liberty, on Liberty Island in New York Harbor, is a globally recognized symbol of both the United States and ideals such as freedom, democracy, and opportunity.
The Unisphere in Flushing Meadows – Corona Park, iconic of Queens, the most ethnically diverse U.S. county and a borough of New York.
The main concourse of Grand Central Terminal, which opened in 1913.
A flooded Avenue C in Manhattan just moments before the explosion at an electrical substation caused by Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012.
Spanish Harlem (El Barrio) in Upper Manhattan
Chinatown, Manhattan (紐約華埠). The New York metropolitan area is home to the largest population of overseas Chinese outside of Asia, over three-quarters of a million in 2013.
Bergen County (버겐 카운티), New Jersey, is home to [[List of U.S. cities with significant Korean-American populations#Top ten municipalities as ranked by Korean-American percentage of overall population in 2010|all of the nation's top ten municipalities by percentage of Korean population]], led by Palisades Park (벼랑 공원) (above), a borough where Koreans comprise the majority (52%) of the population.
India Square, Jersey City, New Jersey, known as Little Bombay, home to the highest concentration of Asian Indians in the Western Hemisphere.
The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree, considered the “worldwide symbol of Christmas”, is an annual staple of the New York metropolitan area during the Holiday season
The New York metropolitan area is home to the largest gay and bisexual community in the United States and one of the world's largest.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on the North Shore of Long Island is an internationally renowned biomedical research facility and home to eight scientists awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
The NY Stock Exchange on Wall St. is the world's largest by total market capitalization of listed companies.
Manhattan's Flatiron District was the cradle of Silicon Alley, now metonymous for the New York metropolitan region's high tech sector, which has since expanded beyond the area.
Butler Library at Columbia University, described as one of the most beautiful college libraries in the United States.
Low Library, the Neoclassical centerpiece of the Columbia University campus
The bronze clock on Harkness Tower at Yale University, a structure reflecting the Collegiate Gothic architectural genre
Watercolor of Cleveland Tower, Princeton University, seen in the noon autumn sun
The George Washington Bridge, connecting Washington Heights in Upper Manhattan across the Hudson River to Fort Lee in Bergen County, New Jersey, is the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge. Interstate 95 and U.S. Route 1/9 cross the river via the bridge, while U.S. Route 46, which lies entirely within New Jersey, ends halfway across the bridge at the state border with New York.
The Walkway over the Hudson, the world's longest pedestrian bridge, connects Ulster and Dutchess counties in New York.
The Long Island Expressway (I-495), viewing eastbound in Corona, Queens
Heavy traffic on the Garden State Parkway in Wall Township, Monmouth County, New Jersey
The AirTrain at JFK International Airport in Jamaica, Queens
Skyline of Six Flags Great Adventure in Jackson Township, Ocean County, New Jersey, the world's largest theme park in 2013. To the far left is Kingda Ka, the world's tallest roller coaster.

The New York metropolitan region's higher education network comprises hundreds of colleges and universities, including New York University and two Ivy League universities: Columbia and Yale.

Kings County, NY (the borough of Brooklyn in NYC)

The Bronx

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Borough of New York City, coextensive with Bronx County, in the U.S. state of New York.

Borough of New York City, coextensive with Bronx County, in the U.S. state of New York.

Map of southern Westchester County in 1867. This, along with the southern part of the former Town of Yonkers, became the Bronx.
Grand Concourse and 161st Street as it appeared around 1900
The Simpson Street elevated station was built in 1904 and opened on November 26, 1904. It was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on September 17, 2004, reference #04001027.
Row houses on a location where there was once burnt rubble. The Bronx has since seen revitalization
The Bronx - All-America City sign
Location of the Bronx (red) within New York City (remainder white)
Aerial view of the Bronx from the east at night
The New York Times 1896 map of parks and transit in the newly annexed Bronx. Marble Hill is in pink, cut off by water from the rest of Manhattan in orange. Van Cortlandt, Pelham Bay and Crotona Parks are light green, as is Bronx Park (now home to the New York Botanical Garden and Bronx Zoo), Woodlawn Cemetery medium green, sports facilities dark green, the not-yet-built Jerome Park Reservoir light blue, St. John's College (now Fordham University) violet, and the city limits of the newly expanded New York red.
Northern tip of Hunter Island in Pelham Bay Park
The neighborhood of Co-op City is the largest cooperative housing development in the world.
A sunken boat off the shore of City Island
Grand Concourse at East 165th Street
Poverty concentrations within the Bronx, by Census Tract
The Bronx Zoo is the largest zoo in New York City, and among the largest in the country.
The Bronx's P.L.A.Y.E.R.S. Club Steppers performing at the 2007 Fort Greene Park Summer Literary Festival in Brooklyn. (Note the T-shirts' inscription "I ♥ BX" [Bronx], echoing the ubiquitous slogan "I ♥ NY" [I Love New York] ).
New Yankee Stadium at 161st and River Avenue
The Hub on Third Avenue
Renovated Prow Building, part of the original Bronx Terminal Market
An aerial view of the Bronx, Harlem River, Harlem, Hudson River and George Washington Bridge
Morris Heights, a Bronx neighborhood of over 45,000
Street scene on Fordham Road, a major street in the Bronx
The Bronx High School of Science
Fordham University's Keating Hall
Bronx–Whitestone Bridge
An aerial view of the Throgs Neck Bridge
Middletown Road subway station on the
NYC Transit bus operating on the Bx40 route in University Heights

The whole territory east of the Bronx River was annexed to the city in 1895, three years before New York's consolidation with Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island.

Three campuses of the City University of New York are in the Bronx: Hostos Community College, Bronx Community College (occupying the former University Heights Campus of New York University) and Herbert H. Lehman College (formerly the uptown campus of Hunter College), which offers both undergraduate and graduate degrees.

New York University Tandon School of Engineering

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NYU Tandon School of Engineering
Polytechnic Institute at 99 Livingston
Wunsch Hall, the oldest building on campus, stands in contrast to the more modern buildings of MetroTech Center, including the adjacent Dibner Library
Polytechnic Institute Electrostatic Laboratory 1903–1904
Jacobs administrative building of NYU Tandon School of Engineering
Wunsch Building
370 Jay St Building
Biomatrix Research Center
Rogers Hall, main academic building and Othmer dormitory building on the background
Bern Dibner Library matches the modern architectural style of Downtown Brooklyn
Starbucks cafe, right by the entrance to Rogers Hall
Ephraim Katzir, alumnus, fourth President of Israel
Norman Lamm, alumnus, third President of Yeshiva University

The New York University Tandon School of Engineering (commonly referred to as Tandon) is the engineering and applied sciences school of New York University.

The school's main campus is in Brooklyn's MetroTech Center, an urban academic-industrial research park.