Brooks Robinson

Brooks Robinson NightRobinson
Brooks Calbert Robinson Jr. (born May 18, 1937) is an American former professional baseball player.wikipedia
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Baltimore Orioles

OriolesBaltimoreMilwaukee Brewers
He played his entire 23-year major league career for the Baltimore Orioles (1955–1977), which still stands as the record for the longest career spent with a single team in major league history.
This era of the club featured several future Hall of Famers who would later be inducted representing the Orioles, such as third baseman Brooks Robinson, outfielder Frank Robinson, starting pitcher Jim Palmer, first baseman Eddie Murray, shortstop Cal Ripken Jr., and manager Earl Weaver.

1983 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

1983year
Robinson was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1983.
elected two, Juan Marichal and Brooks Robinson.

1966 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

1966All-Star Game1966 All-Star Game
In 1966, he was voted the All-Star Game Most Valuable Player, and finished second to teammate Frank Robinson in the American League Most Valuable Player Award voting, as the Orioles went on to win the 1966 World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers.
A triple by Brooks Robinson in the second inning off Sandy Koufax was followed by a wild pitch, giving the American Leaguers a 1–0 lead.

Lamar Porter Athletic Field

Lamar Porter Field
Young Brooks Robinson Jr., delivered the Arkansas Gazette on his bicycle and also operated the scoreboard and sold soft drinks at Lamar Porter Field.
Hall of Fame third baseman Brooks Robinson started his career at Porter Field.

1970 Baltimore Orioles season

Baltimore Orioles1970Baltimore
In the 1970 post-season, Robinson hit for a .583 batting average in the 1970 American League Championship Series against the Minnesota Twins.
They then went on to win their second World Series title over the National League champion Cincinnati Reds in five games, thanks to the glove of third baseman Brooks Robinson.

1966 World Series

1966World Seriesworld champion
In 1966, he was voted the All-Star Game Most Valuable Player, and finished second to teammate Frank Robinson in the American League Most Valuable Player Award voting, as the Orioles went on to win the 1966 World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers.
In the top of the first inning, after Luis Aparicio flied to right, Drysdale walked Russ Snyder, and then Frank Robinson and Brooks Robinson hit back-to-back home runs to give the Orioles an early 3–0 lead.

1974 in baseball

1974741974 season
In his playing career, Robinson was selected for the All-Star team in 15 consecutive years (-74) and played in four World Series.
Brooks Robinson (3B) (AL)

Mickey Mantle

MantleMickeya mysterious man wearing a New York Yankees hat
In the American League MVP voting, he received 18 of the 20 first-place votes, with Mickey Mantle finishing second.
On June 5, he tried to prevent a home run by Brooks Robinson in Baltimore and got his shoe spikes caught in the center field chain link fence as he leaped against the fence for the ball and was coming down.

1970 American League Championship Series

1970ALCS1970 ALCS
In the 1970 post-season, Robinson hit for a .583 batting average in the 1970 American League Championship Series against the Minnesota Twins.
Two singles and Brooks Robinson's sacrifice fly produced one fourth-inning run off Jim Perry, the Twins' 24-game winner, and the Orioles loaded the bases with one out after two more singles.

Cincinnati Reds

RedsCincinnatiCIN
After the 1970 World Series, Cincinnati Reds manager Sparky Anderson quipped, "I'm beginning to see Brooks in my sleep. If I dropped this paper plate, he'd pick it up on one hop and throw me out at first."
By the time the club got to the World Series, however, the Reds pitching staff had run out of gas and the veteran Baltimore Orioles, led by Hall of Fame third baseman and World Series MVP Brooks Robinson, beat the Reds in five games.

1964 Baltimore Orioles season

1964Baltimore1964 Orioles
In 1964, Robinson had his best season offensively, hitting for a .318 batting average with 28 home runs and led the league with 118 runs batted in, winning the American League Most Valuable Player Award.

Triple play

triple playstriple-playall three outs
Robinson, a slow baserunner, also hit into four triple plays during his career, a major league record.
During the 1973 season, Baltimore Orioles third baseman Brooks Robinson started two such 5-4-3 triple plays; one on July 7 against the Oakland Athletics, and one on September 20 against the Detroit Tigers.

1970 World Series

1970World Series1970 MLB World Series
In the 1970 World Series against the Cincinnati Reds, Robinson had a .429 batting average with 2 home runs; however, it was his defensive prowess at third base that stood out, making several impressive plays during the series that robbed the Reds of apparent base hits.
Weaver balanced good pitching with the hitting of 1970 AL MVP Boog Powell (35, 114, .297), Merv Rettenmund (18, 58, .322), as well as future Hall of Famers Frank Robinson (25, 78, .306) and Brooks Robinson (18, 94, .276).

1966 Baltimore Orioles season

Baltimore Orioles1966Orioles
In 1966, he was voted the All-Star Game Most Valuable Player, and finished second to teammate Frank Robinson in the American League Most Valuable Player Award voting, as the Orioles went on to win the 1966 World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers.
Brooks Robinson

Hickok Belt

Hickok Belt Award
His performance won him the World Series MVP Award presented by SPORT, as well as the Hickok Belt as top professional athlete of the year.

Little Rock, Arkansas

Little RockLittle Rock, ARArkansas
Robinson was born in Little Rock, Arkansas, to Brooks Calbert and Ethel Mae (née Denker) Robinson.
Brooks Robinson (born 1937), Hall of Fame 3rd baseman for the Baltimore Orioles. Born in Little Rock and graduated from Little Rock High School in 1955.

Frank Robinson

Robinson
In 1966, he was voted the All-Star Game Most Valuable Player, and finished second to teammate Frank Robinson in the American League Most Valuable Player Award voting, as the Orioles went on to win the 1966 World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers.
Robinson is also a charter member of the Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame (along with Brooks Robinson), and a member of the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame, being inducted into both in 1978.

Carl Yastrzemski

YastrzemskiCarl "Yaz" Yastrzemski
Robinson's 23 seasons with one team set a new major league record, since tied by Carl Yastrzemski.
He is one of two players to win the All-Star Game MVP Award despite playing for the losing team, Brooks Robinson having done so in 1966.

Little Rock Central High School

Central High SchoolLittle Rock CentralLittle Rock High School
After he graduated from Little Rock High School on May 27, 1955, where he was scouted for the Arkansas Razorbacks baseball program in Fayetteville, he played in South America in 1955 and in Cuba in 1957.
Brooks Robinson (1955)—Hall of Fame third baseman for the Baltimore Orioles

Rawlings Gold Glove Award

Gold GloveGold Glove AwardGold Gloves
He won 16 consecutive Gold Glove Awards during his career, tied with pitcher Jim Kaat for the second-most all-time for any player at any position.
Brooks Robinson has the most wins as a third baseman, with 16 Gold Gloves, and is tied for the second-highest total overall with pitcher Jim Kaat, who won his 16 awards consecutively.

1977 Baltimore Orioles season

1977Baltimore OriolesOrioles
At the conclusion of his final season in 1977, his jersey number 5 was retired by the Orioles.

WMAR-TV

WMARABC2stations
In 1982, local television WMAR's on-air news team in Baltimore, Maryland went on strike and picketed the WMAR headquarters for the two months approaching the baseball season.
When color announcer (and long-time popular Baltimore Orioles third baseman) Brooks Robinson refused to cross the picket line at the start of the baseball season, the strike ended.

Assist (baseball)

assistsassistoutfield assist
His totals of 2870 games played at third base, 2697 career putouts, 6205 career assists, 8902 career total chances and 618 double plays were records for third basemen at the time of his retirement.
3) Brooks Robinson: 410 (Baltimore Orioles, 1974)

Mark Belanger

Robinson made his final batting appearance on August 5, 1977 at Anaheim Stadium, pinch hitting for Mark Belanger in the top of the eighth inning.
And with Brooks Robinson winning at third base every year through 1975, the left side of the Orioles' infield was seemingly impenetrable.

List of Major League Baseball players who spent their entire career with one franchise

played his entire careerPlayers who spent their entire career with one franchise
[[List of Major League Baseball players who spent their entire career with one franchise]]
, 177 players have accomplished this feat, of which the New York Yankees have had the most, with 25. Brooks Robinson and Carl Yastrzemski share the distinction of the longest tenure with a single team, 23 seasons with the Baltimore Orioles and Boston Red Sox, respectively.