Brown bear

Ursus arctosbearbrownBruinbrown bearsbearsU. arctoswild bearBruinsUrsos arctos
The brown bear (Ursus arctos) is a bear species that is found across much of northern Eurasia and North America.wikipedia
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Polar bear

polar bearsUrsus maritimuspolar
It is one of the largest living terrestrial members of the order Carnivora, rivalled in size only by its closest relative, the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), which is much less variable in size and slightly larger on average.
Although it is the sister species of the brown bear, it has evolved to occupy a narrower ecological niche, with many body characteristics adapted for cold temperatures, for moving across snow, ice and open water, and for hunting seals, which make up most of its diet.

Bear

Ursidaebearsursine
The brown bear (Ursus arctos) is a bear species that is found across much of northern Eurasia and North America.
The IUCN lists six bear species as vulnerable or endangered, and even least concern species, such as the brown bear, are at risk of extirpation in certain countries.

American black bear

black bearblack bearsUrsus americanus
, this and the American black bear are the only bear species not classified as threatened by the IUCN.
Along with the brown bear, it is one of only two of the eight modern bear species not considered by the IUCN to be globally threatened with extinction.

Eurasian brown bear

European brown bearbrown bearbear
The Marsican brown bear of central Italy is one of several currently isolated populations of the Eurasian brown bear, and believed to have a population of just 40 to 50 bears.
The Eurasian brown bear (Ursus arctos arctos) is one of the most common subspecies of the brown bear, and is found in much of Eurasia.

Atlas bear

Populations that were hunted to extinction in the 19th and 20th centuries are the Atlas bear of North Africa, and the Californian, Ungavan and Mexican populations of the grizzly bear of North America, and many of the populations in southern parts of Eurasia are highly endangered.
The names Atlas bear and African bear (Ursus arctos crowtheri) have been applied to an extinct population or populations of the brown bear in North Africa.

Himalayan brown bear

Ursus arctos isabellinusDzu-TehHimalayan
One of the smaller-bodied forms, the Himalayan brown bear, is critically endangered, occupying only 2% of its former range and threatened by uncontrolled poaching for its body parts.
The Himalayan brown bear (Ursus arctos isabellinus), also known as the Himalayan red bear, isabelline bear or Dzu-Teh, is a subspecies of the brown bear and is known from northern Afghanistan, northern Pakistan, northern India, west China and Nepal.

Cave bear

Ursus spelaeuscave bearsbear
A genetic analysis indicated that the brown bear lineage diverged from the cave bear species complex approximately 1.2–1.4 million years ago, but did not clarify if ''U.
This reflects the views of experts that cave bears may have spent more time in caves than the brown bear, which uses caves only for hibernation.

California grizzly bear

California grizzlygrislyMonarch
Populations that were hunted to extinction in the 19th and 20th centuries are the Atlas bear of North Africa, and the Californian, Ungavan and Mexican populations of the grizzly bear of North America, and many of the populations in southern parts of Eurasia are highly endangered.
The California grizzly bear (Ursus arctos californicus) is an extinct subspecies or population of the grizzly bear, the very large North American brown bear.

Asian black bear

Asiatic black bearblack bearAsiatic black bears
The projections of the skull are well developed when compared to those of Asian black bears (Ursus thibetanus): the latter have sagittal crests not exceeding more than 19–20% of the total length of the skull, while the former have sagittal crests comprising up to 40–41% of the skull's length.
Asiatic black bears are similar in general appearance to brown bears, but are more lightly built and are more slender limbed.

Sloth bear

sloth bearsMelursusIndian sloth bear
Another extant ursine bear, the sloth bear (Melursus ursinus), has a proportionately longer skull than the brown bear and can match the skull length of even large brown bear subtypes, presumably as an aid for foraging heavily on insect colonies for which a long muzzle is helpful as an evolved feature in several unrelated mammalian groups.
It is lankier than brown and Asian black bears.

Romania

ROURomanianRomânia
The brown bear's principal range includes parts of Russia, Central Asia, China, Canada, the United States, Hokkaido, Scandinavia, and the Carpathian region, especially Romania, Anatolia and the Caucasus. In Europe, there are 14,000 brown bears in ten fragmented populations, from Spain (estimated at only 20–25 animals in the Pyrenees in 2010, in a range shared between France, Spain and Andorra, and some 210 animals in Asturias, Cantabria, Galicia and León, in the Picos de Europa and adjacent areas in 2013 in the west, to Russia in the east, and from Sweden and Finland in the north to Romania (4000–5000), Bulgaria (900–1200), Slovakia (with about 600–800 animals), Slovenia (500–700 animals) and Greece (with about 200 animals) in the south.
The fauna of Romania consists of 33,792 species of animals, 33,085 invertebrate and 707 vertebrate, with almost 400 unique species of mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians, including about 50% of Europe's (excluding Russia) brown bears and 20% of its wolves.

Ursus etruscus

Etruscan bear
Brown bears are thought to have evolved from Ursus etruscus in Asia.
Ursus etruscus appears to have evolved from Ursus minimus and gave rise to the modern brown bear, Ursus arctos, and the extinct cave bear, Ursus spelaeus.

Mexican grizzly bear

MexicanMexican silver grizzlyMexican death bears
Populations that were hunted to extinction in the 19th and 20th centuries are the Atlas bear of North Africa, and the Californian, Ungavan and Mexican populations of the grizzly bear of North America, and many of the populations in southern parts of Eurasia are highly endangered.
Like all brown bears, Mexican grizzlies were omnivores.

Spectacled bear

Andean bearTremarctos ornatusspectacled bears
The teeth of brown bears reflect their dietary plasticity and are broadly similar to other bears, excluding the two most herbivorous living bears, the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and the spectacled bear (Tremarctos ornatus), which have blunt, small premolars (ideal for grinding down fibrous plants) compared to the jagged premolars of ursid bears that at least seasonally often rely on flesh as a food source.
A single spectacled bear population on the border of Peru and Ecuador inhabited as great a range of habitat types as the world's brown bears (Ursus arctos) now occupy.

Grizzly bear

grizzly bearsgrizzlyGrizzlies
In North America, the populations of brown bears are often called "grizzly bears".
The grizzly bear (Ursus arctos ssp., or Ursus arctos horribilis), also known as the "North American brown bear" or simply grizzly, is a large population or subspecies of the brown bear inhabiting North America.

Finland

FinnishFINRepublic of Finland
In Europe, there are 14,000 brown bears in ten fragmented populations, from Spain (estimated at only 20–25 animals in the Pyrenees in 2010, in a range shared between France, Spain and Andorra, and some 210 animals in Asturias, Cantabria, Galicia and León, in the Picos de Europa and adjacent areas in 2013 in the west, to Russia in the east, and from Sweden and Finland in the north to Romania (4000–5000), Bulgaria (900–1200), Slovakia (with about 600–800 animals), Slovenia (500–700 animals) and Greece (with about 200 animals) in the south. Northern Europe is home to a large bear population, with an estimated 2,500 (range 2,350–2,900) in Sweden, about 1,600 in Finland, about 700 in Estonia and 70 in Norway.
Large and widely recognized wildlife mammals found in Finland are the brown bear (the national animal), gray wolf, wolverine, and elk.

Carpathian Mountains

CarpathiansCarpathianSłonne Mountain
The brown bear's principal range includes parts of Russia, Central Asia, China, Canada, the United States, Hokkaido, Scandinavia, and the Carpathian region, especially Romania, Anatolia and the Caucasus.
The Carpathians provide habitat for the largest European populations of brown bears, wolves, chamois, and lynxes, with the highest concentration in Romania, as well as over one third of all European plant species.

Paraspecies

paraphyletic speciation
savini'' persisted as a paraspecies for the brown bear before perishing.
The evolution of the polar bear from the brown bear is a well-documented example of a living species that gave rise to another living species.

Pyrenees

PyrénéesPyreneanPyrenees Mountains
In Europe, there are 14,000 brown bears in ten fragmented populations, from Spain (estimated at only 20–25 animals in the Pyrenees in 2010, in a range shared between France, Spain and Andorra, and some 210 animals in Asturias, Cantabria, Galicia and León, in the Picos de Europa and adjacent areas in 2013 in the west, to Russia in the east, and from Sweden and Finland in the north to Romania (4000–5000), Bulgaria (900–1200), Slovakia (with about 600–800 animals), Slovenia (500–700 animals) and Greece (with about 200 animals) in the south.
The Pyrenean ibex mysteriously became extinct in January 2000; the native Pyrenean brown bear was hunted to near-extinction in the 1990s, but it was re-introduced in 1996 when three bears were brought from Slovenia.

Slovenia

SloveneSlovenianRepublic of Slovenia
In Europe, there are 14,000 brown bears in ten fragmented populations, from Spain (estimated at only 20–25 animals in the Pyrenees in 2010, in a range shared between France, Spain and Andorra, and some 210 animals in Asturias, Cantabria, Galicia and León, in the Picos de Europa and adjacent areas in 2013 in the west, to Russia in the east, and from Sweden and Finland in the north to Romania (4000–5000), Bulgaria (900–1200), Slovakia (with about 600–800 animals), Slovenia (500–700 animals) and Greece (with about 200 animals) in the south.
According to recent estimates, Slovenia has c. 40–60 wolves and about 450 brown bears.

Greece

GreekHellenic RepublicGreeks
In Europe, there are 14,000 brown bears in ten fragmented populations, from Spain (estimated at only 20–25 animals in the Pyrenees in 2010, in a range shared between France, Spain and Andorra, and some 210 animals in Asturias, Cantabria, Galicia and León, in the Picos de Europa and adjacent areas in 2013 in the west, to Russia in the east, and from Sweden and Finland in the north to Romania (4000–5000), Bulgaria (900–1200), Slovakia (with about 600–800 animals), Slovenia (500–700 animals) and Greece (with about 200 animals) in the south.
Rare marine species such as the pinniped seals and the loggerhead sea turtle live in the seas surrounding mainland Greece, while its dense forests are home to the endangered brown bear, the Eurasian lynx, the roe deer and the wild goat.

Caucasus

CaucasianCaucasiathe Caucasus
The brown bear's principal range includes parts of Russia, Central Asia, China, Canada, the United States, Hokkaido, Scandinavia, and the Carpathian region, especially Romania, Anatolia and the Caucasus.
Its wildlife includes Persian leopards, brown bears, wolves, bison, marals, golden eagles and hooded crows.

Brown

dark brownlight brownBrown/Black
This name originated in the fable, History of Reynard the Fox, translated by William Caxton, from Middle Dutch bruun or bruyn, meaning brown (the color).

Syrian brown bear

Caucasian bearSyrian bearUrsus arctos syriacus
The Syrian brown bear (Ursus arctos syriacus) is very rare and it has been extirpated from more than half of its historic range.
The Syrian brown bear (Ursus arctos syriacus or Ursus arctos arctos) is a relatively small subspecies of brown bear native to the Middle East.

Norway

NorwegianKingdom of NorwayNOR
Northern Europe is home to a large bear population, with an estimated 2,500 (range 2,350–2,900) in Sweden, about 1,600 in Finland, about 700 in Estonia and 70 in Norway.
The largest predator on land is the polar bear, while the brown bear is the largest predator on the Norwegian mainland.