Buckingham Palace

Buckingham HouseGoring Housethe PalaceA large building in London that is the official residence of the reigning British sovereignBuck HouseBuckinghamBuckingham Palace Act 1832Chuckingham PalacepalaceRoyal household
Buckingham Palace is the London residence and administrative headquarters of the monarch of the United Kingdom.wikipedia
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London

London, EnglandLondon, United KingdomLondon, UK
Buckingham Palace is the London residence and administrative headquarters of the monarch of the United Kingdom.
Other landmarks include Buckingham Palace, the London Eye, Piccadilly Circus, St Paul's Cathedral, Tower Bridge, Trafalgar Square and The Shard.

City of Westminster

WestminsterLondon Borough of WestminsterWestminster, London
Located in the City of Westminster, the palace is often at the centre of state occasions and royal hospitality.
Many sites commonly associated with London are in the borough, including St James's Palace, Buckingham Palace, the Palace of Westminster (Houses of Parliament) and 10 Downing Street.

John Nash (architect)

John NashNashSir John Nash
During the 19th century it was enlarged, principally by architects John Nash and Edward Blore, who constructed three wings around a central courtyard.
Nash's best-known solo designs are the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, Marble Arch, and Buckingham Palace; his best known collaboration with James Burton is Regent Street; and his best-known collaborations with Decimus Burton are Regent's Park and its terraces and Carlton House Terrace.

Edward VII

King Edward VIIPrince of WalesEdward VII of the United Kingdom
King Edward VII oversaw a partial redecoration in a Belle Époque cream and gold colour scheme.
Edward was born at 10:48 in the morning on 9 November 1841 in Buckingham Palace.

Royal Collection

The Royal CollectionRoyal Collection DepartmentBritish Royal Collection
A German bomb destroyed the palace chapel during World War II; the Queen's Gallery was built on the site and opened to the public in 1962 to exhibit works of art from the Royal Collection.
The Queen's Gallery at Buckingham Palace in London was built specially to exhibit pieces from the collection on a rotating basis.

Queen's Gallery

The Queen's GalleryQueen’s Gallery
A German bomb destroyed the palace chapel during World War II; the Queen's Gallery was built on the site and opened to the public in 1962 to exhibit works of art from the Royal Collection.
The Queen's Gallery is a public art gallery at Buckingham Palace, home of the British monarch, in London.

George III of the United Kingdom

George IIIKing George IIIGeorge III of Great Britain
It was acquired by King George III in 1761 as a private residence for Queen Charlotte and became known as The Queen's House.
In 1762, George purchased Buckingham House (on the site now occupied by Buckingham Palace) for use as a family retreat.

Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz

Queen CharlotteCharlottethe Queen
It was acquired by King George III in 1761 as a private residence for Queen Charlotte and became known as The Queen's House.
St James's Palace functioned as the official residence of the royal couple, but the king had recently purchased a nearby property, Buckingham House, located at the western end of St James's Park.

Queen Victoria

VictoriaVictoria of the United KingdomDiamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria
Buckingham Palace became the London residence of the British monarch on the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837.
She became the first sovereign to take up residence at Buckingham Palace and inherited the revenues of the duchies of Lancaster and Cornwall as well as being granted a civil list allowance of £385,000 per year.

Edward Blore

BloreSir Edward Blore
During the 19th century it was enlarged, principally by architects John Nash and Edward Blore, who constructed three wings around a central courtyard. On the death of George IV in 1830, his younger brother King William IV hired Edward Blore to finish the work.
Blore is most notable for his completion of John Nash's design of Buckingham Palace, following Nash's dismissal.

St James's Palace

St. James's PalaceSt James’s PalaceSt James
In 1531, Henry VIII acquired the Hospital of St James, which became St James's Palace, from Eton College, and in 1536 he took the Manor of Ebury from Westminster Abbey.
The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries.

Townhouse (Great Britain)

townhousetown housetownhouses
Originally known as Buckingham House, the building at the core of today's palace was a large townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1703 on a site that had been in private ownership for at least 150 years.

Eia

EburyEbury Manor Manor of Ebury
In the Middle Ages, the site of the future palace formed part of the Manor of Ebury (also called Eia).
It approximated to the western bulk of the SW1 postcode area, specifically, much of Hyde Park (which dates from 1536), the grounds of Buckingham Palace (1703) and Belgravia, a country road known later as Park Lane and most parts of Mayfair, Pimlico, and Knightsbridge.

George IV of the United Kingdom

George IVKing George IVPrince Regent
After his accession to the throne in 1820, King George IV continued the renovation with the idea in mind of a small, comfortable home.
He commissioned John Nash to build the Royal Pavilion in Brighton and remodel Buckingham Palace, and Sir Jeffry Wyatville to rebuild Windsor Castle.

William IV of the United Kingdom

William IVKing William IVDuke of Clarence
On the death of George IV in 1830, his younger brother King William IV hired Edward Blore to finish the work.
William was born in the early hours of the morning on 21 August 1765 at Buckingham House, the third child and son of King George III and Queen Charlotte.

The Mall, London

The MallMallLondon
The large East Front, facing The Mall, is today the "public face" of Buckingham Palace, and contains the balcony from which the royal family acknowledge the crowds on momentous occasions and after the annual Trooping the Colour.
The Mall is a road in the City of Westminster, central London, between Buckingham Palace at its western end and Trafalgar Square via Admiralty Arch to the east.

River Tyburn

TyburnTyburn (stream)Lady Ty
The marshy ground was watered by the river Tyburn, which still flows below the courtyard and south wing of the palace.
Between St James's Park and Buckingham Palace the waters divided to create two distributaries, creating Thorney Island on which Westminster Abbey was built.

Trooping the Colour

Queen's Birthday Paradeofficial birthday flypastTrooping of the Colour
The large East Front, facing The Mall, is today the "public face" of Buckingham Palace, and contains the balcony from which the royal family acknowledge the crowds on momentous occasions and after the annual Trooping the Colour.
The Queen travels down the Mall from Buckingham Palace in a royal procession with a sovereign's escort of Household Cavalry (mounted troops or horse guards).

Palace of Westminster

Houses of ParliamentWestminster HallWestminster
After the destruction of the Palace of Westminster by fire in 1834, William considered converting the palace into the new Houses of Parliament.
Immediately after the fire, King William IV offered the almost-completed Buckingham Palace to Parliament, hoping to dispose of a residence he disliked.

Carlton House

Carlton House, LondonCarlton House PalaceNo 10 Carlton House Terrence
Many smaller reception rooms are furnished in the Chinese regency style with furniture and fittings brought from the Royal Pavilion at Brighton and from Carlton House.
Some consideration was given to rebuilding Carlton House on a far larger scale, but in the end Buckingham House was rebuilt as Buckingham Palace instead.

John Sheffield, 1st Duke of Buckingham and Normanby

John Sheffield, 3rd Earl of MulgraveDuke of BuckinghamJohn Sheffield
Originally known as Buckingham House, the building at the core of today's palace was a large townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1703 on a site that had been in private ownership for at least 150 years.
He died on 24 February 1721 at his house in St. James's Park, on the site of the present Buckingham Palace.

Somerset House

Denmark HouseBrazil HouseLord Protector's house
In 1775, an Act of Parliament settled the property on Queen Charlotte, in exchange for her rights to Somerset House, and 14 of her 15 children were born there.
In due course, the King outlived the Queen and the property (later known as Buckingham Palace) reverted "to the use of His Majesty, his heirs and successors".

Osborne House

OsborneOsbourne HouseDurbar Lawn at Osborne House
Widowed in 1861, the grief-stricken Queen withdrew from public life and left Buckingham Palace to live at Windsor Castle, Balmoral Castle and Osborne House.
The builder was Thomas Cubitt, the London architect and builder whose company built the main facade of Buckingham Palace for the royal couple in 1847.

Sir Charles Herbert Sheffield, 1st Baronet

CharlesCharles Herbert SheffieldSir Charles Herbert Sheffield
Buckingham House was eventually sold by Buckingham's natural son, Sir Charles Sheffield, in 1761 to George III for £21,000.
1706–1774) of Normanby, Lincolnshire, England, was an illegitimate son of John Sheffield, 1st Duke of Buckingham and Normanby and the first of the Sheffield baronets, and the owner of Buckingham Palace (then known as Buckingham House) who sold it to King George III.

Monarchy of the United Kingdom

MonarchBritish monarchQueen of the United Kingdom
Buckingham Palace is the London residence and administrative headquarters of the monarch of the United Kingdom.
The Royal Collection, which includes artworks and the Crown Jewels, is not owned by the sovereign personally and is held in trust, as are the occupied palaces in the United Kingdom such as Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle.