Buddhism in Sri Lanka

BuddhistSri LankaSri Lankan BuddhismBuddhismBuddhistsSri LankanSri Lankan BuddhistBuddha SasanaBuddhists in Sri LankaSri Lankan Buddhists
Theravada Buddhism is the official religion of the majority of Sri Lanka practiced by 70% of Sri Lanka's population.wikipedia
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Sri Lanka

CeylonCeyloneseDemocratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka
Theravada Buddhism is the official religion of the majority of Sri Lanka practiced by 70% of Sri Lanka's population.
It has a rich cultural heritage, and the first known Buddhist writings of Sri Lanka, the Pāli Canon, date back to the Fourth Buddhist council in 29 BC.

Buddhism

BuddhistBuddhistsBuddhadharma
Theravada Buddhism is the official religion of the majority of Sri Lanka practiced by 70% of Sri Lanka's population.
Theravada Buddhism has a widespread following in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia such as Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Thailand.

Milinda Panha

MilindapanhaMilinda PañhaMilindapañha
See also the Milinda Panha.
The Milinda Pañha is not regarded as canonical by Thai or Sri Lankan Buddhism, however, despite the surviving Theravāda text being in Sinhalese script.

Vijayabahu I of Polonnaruwa

Vijayabahu IKing Vijayabahu IVijayabahu
In 1070, Vijayabahu I of Polonnaruwa conquered the island and set about repairing the monasteries.
During his reign, he re-established Buddhism in Sri Lanka and repaired much of the damage caused to infrastructure during the wars.

Aluvihare Rock Temple

Alu ViharayaAluviharaAluvihara Rock Cave Temple
The compilation of the Atthakatha (commentaries) along with the Nikāyas and other Pitakas were committed to writing for the first time in the Aluvihare Rock Temple during the first century BCE.
There was also a South Indian invasion at the same time and the Buddhist monks of that era realized that these problems would be a danger to the existence of Buddha Sasana in the country.

Theravada

Theravada BuddhismTheravādaTheravada Buddhist
Theravada Buddhism is the official religion of the majority of Sri Lanka practiced by 70% of Sri Lanka's population.

Mahinda (Buddhist monk)

MahindaMahendraMahinda Thera
According to traditional Sri Lankan chronicles such as the Dipavamsa, Buddhism was introduced into Sri Lanka in the third century BCE after the Third Buddhist council by Arhanthà Mahinda thero, son of Emperor Ashoka, during the reign of Devanampiya Tissa of Anuradhapura.

Weliwita Sri Saranankara Thero

Asarana Sarana Saranankara Maha TheraWelivita Sri Saranankara TheroWeliwita Saranamkara
In the mid 18th century the higher ordination of Buddhist monks known as upasampada, which was defunct at the time, was revived with the help of Thai Buddhist monks on the initiatives taken by Weliwita Sri Saranankara Thero during the reign of king Kirthi Sri Rajasinghe.
He was the pioneer in the revival of Buddhism in Sri Lanka, after the decline of the religion in the 17th and 18th centuries.

Henry Steel Olcott

Buddhist Theosophical SocietyHenry OlcottColonel Henry Steel Olcott
In 1880 Henry Steel Olcott arrived in Sri Lanka with Madame Blavatsky of the Theosophical Society; he had been inspired when he read about the Panadura debate and after learning about Buddhism converted to the religion.
Olcott was a major revivalist of Buddhism in Sri Lanka and he is still honored in Sri Lanka for these efforts.

Migettuwatte Gunananda Thera

Panadura debatePanadurawadayaGunananda
In the 19th century, a national Buddhist movement began as a response to Christian proselytizing, and was empowered by the results of the Panadura debate between Christian priests and Buddhist monks such as Migettuwatte Gunananda Thera and Hikkaduwe Sri Sumangala Thera which was widely seen as a victory for the Buddhists.
As a result of the debates, Buddhism in Sri Lanka saw a revival.

Walisinghe Harischandra

Revivalist Buddhist scholars include Sir D. B. Jayatilaka, F. R. Senanayake, Walisinghe Harischandra and W. A. de Silva.
Brahmachari Walisinghe Harischandra (Sinhala:බ්‍රහ්මචාරී වලිසිංහ හරිශ්චන්ද්‍ර; 9 July 1876 - 13 September 1913 ) was a social reformer, historian, author and revivalist of Sri Lankan Buddhism He was a follower of Anagarika Dharmapala, who gave leadership to the Buddhist revivalist movement, after the lead given by Colonel Henry Steel Olcott.

Bhikkhunī

bhikkhuniBuddhist nunnuns
A few years after the arrival of Mahinda, Bhikkhuni Sanghamitta, who is also believed to be the daughter of Emperor Ashoka came to Sri Lanka.
These women are known as dasa sil mata in Sri Lankan Buddhism, thilashin in Burmese Buddhism, Maechi in Thai Buddhism, guruma in Nepal and Laos and siladharas at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery in England.

Thai people

ThaiSiameseThais
Since the rule of King Ramkhamhaeng of Sukhothai and again since the "orthodox reformation" of King Mongkut in the 19th century, it is modeled on the "original" Sri Lankan Theravada Buddhism.

Siam Nikaya

Siyam NikayaBuddhist monastic establishmentSiam

Amarapura Nikaya

AmarapuraAmarapura Maha Sangha SabhaAmarapura Nikāya

Sinhalese people

SinhaleseSinhalaCingalese
Buddhism in Sri Lanka is predominantly practised by the Sinhalese, however the 2012 Sri Lanka Census revealed a Buddhist population of 22,254 including eleven monks, amongst the Sri Lankan Tamil population, accounting to roughly 1% of all Sri Lankan Tamils in Sri Lanka.

State religion

Established Churchofficial religionestablished
Theravada Buddhism is the official religion of the majority of Sri Lanka practiced by 70% of Sri Lanka's population.

Common Era

CEBCEC.E.
The island has been a center of Buddhist scholarship and learning since the introduction of Buddhism in the third century BCE producing eminent scholars such as Buddhaghosa and preserving the vast Pāli Canon.

Buddhaghosa

BuddhagosaBuddhaghoṣaBuddhaghosha
The island has been a center of Buddhist scholarship and learning since the introduction of Buddhism in the third century BCE producing eminent scholars such as Buddhaghosa and preserving the vast Pāli Canon.

Dīpavaṃsa

DipavamsaDipavaṃsaDîpavamsa
According to traditional Sri Lankan chronicles such as the Dipavamsa, Buddhism was introduced into Sri Lanka in the third century BCE after the Third Buddhist council by Arhanthà Mahinda thero, son of Emperor Ashoka, during the reign of Devanampiya Tissa of Anuradhapura.

Third Buddhist council

Third Councils
According to traditional Sri Lankan chronicles such as the Dipavamsa, Buddhism was introduced into Sri Lanka in the third century BCE after the Third Buddhist council by Arhanthà Mahinda thero, son of Emperor Ashoka, during the reign of Devanampiya Tissa of Anuradhapura.

Ashoka

AsokaAshoka the GreatEmperor Ashoka
According to traditional Sri Lankan chronicles such as the Dipavamsa, Buddhism was introduced into Sri Lanka in the third century BCE after the Third Buddhist council by Arhanthà Mahinda thero, son of Emperor Ashoka, during the reign of Devanampiya Tissa of Anuradhapura.