Our Lady of Buen Aire in front of the National Migration Department
Juan de Garay founding Buenos Aires in 1580. The initial settlement, founded by Pedro de Mendoza, had been abandoned since 1542.
Governor Juan Manuel de Rosas (1841 oil portrait by Cayetano Descalzi) ruled until 1852 with an iron fist and kept the fragile Confederation under the tutelage of Buenos Aires Province.
Aldus verthoont hem de stadt Buenos Ayrros geleegen in Rio de la Plata, painting by a Dutch sailor who anchored at the port around 1628.
Period illustration of the 1882 placement of La Plata's foundation stone.
Emeric Essex Vidal, General view of Buenos Ayres from the Plaza de Toros, 1820. In this area now lies the Plaza San Martín.
Provincial Government House in La Plata
Impression of the Buenos Aires Cathedral by Carlos Pellegrini, 1829.
Provincial Legislature in La Plata
View of the Avenida de Mayo in 1915
Federal courts in La Plata
Construction of the Obelisk of Buenos Aires on the 9 de Julio Avenue, 1936.
Köppen climate map of Buenos Aires
9 de Julio Avenue, 1986.
Boundaries of the 135 partidos of Buenos Aires Province
Catalinas Norte is an important business complex composed of nineteen commercial office buildings and occupied by numerous leading Argentine companies, foreign subsidiaries, and diplomatic offices. It is located in the Retiro and San Nicolás neighborhoods.
Downtown Mar del Plata
Satellite view of the Greater Buenos Aires area, and the Río de la Plata.
View of Bahía Blanca
Buenos Aires Botanical Garden
Downtown La Plata
Heavy rain and thunderstorm in Plaza San Martin. Thunderstorms are usual during the summer.
Curutchet House, World Heritage Site in La Plata
The Buenos Aires City Hall in the right corner of the entrance to the Avenida de Mayo
Libertadores de América and Presidente Perón stadiums in Avellaneda.
Metropolitan Police of Buenos Aires City
Port of Bahía Blanca
The Immigrants' Hotel, constructed in 1906, received and assisted the thousands of immigrants arriving to the city. The hotel is now a National Museum.
Soybean fields near Junín
Villa 31, a villa miseria in Buenos Aires
Ministro Pistarini International Airport
The Metropolitan Cathedral is the main Catholic church in the city.
CNR CKD8 locomotive at Bahía Blanca Sud railway station
The Buenos Aires Stock Exchange, the main stock exchange and financial center of Argentina.
Headquarters of the National Bank of Argentina, the national bank and the largest in the country's banking sector.
Buenos Aires Bus, the city's tourist bus service. The official estimate is that the bus carries between 700 and 800 passengers per day, and has carried half a million passengers since its opening.
Monument to the Carta Magna and Four Regions of Argentina in the neighborhood of Palermo
The Centro Cultural Kirchner (Kirchner Cultural Center), located at the former Central Post Office, is the largest of Latin America.
Homage to Buenos Aires, a mural located at the Carlos Gardel station of the Buenos Aires Underground. It represents a typical scene from the city and several of its icons, such as singer Carlos Gardel, the Obelisco, the port, tango dancing and the Abasto market.
Buenos Aires Museum of Modern Art.
MALBA
The interior of El Ateneo Grand Splendid, a celebrated bookstore located in the barrio of Recoleta.
Tango dancers during the World tango dance tournament.
The Buenos Aires Philharmonic.
Gaumont Cinema opened in 1912.
A screening at Parque Centenario, as part of the 2011 edition of BAFICI
A fashion show at the Planetarium in 2013, as part of BAFWEEK.
View of Bolívar Street facing the Cabildo and Diagonal Norte, on Buenos Aires' historical center. The city's characteristic convergence of diverse architectural styles can be seen, including Spanish Colonial, Beaux-Arts and modernist architecture.
Teatro Colón.
Colegio Nacional de Buenos Aires, a public high school in Buenos Aires, and it is one of the most prestigious in Argentina and Latin America.
University of Buenos Aires' Law School in Recoleta
July 9 Avenue
Aeroparque Jorge Newbery
A Mitre Line Trenes Argentinos train in Retiro railway station
Map of the Greater Buenos Aires Commuter Rail Network
EcoBici.
200 Series rolling stock at San José de Flores station, Buenos Aires Underground.
Buenos Aires Underground map
Metrobus, Paseo del Bajo.
Buquebus high-speed ferries connect Buenos Aires to Uruguay
Campo Argentino de Polo, home of the Argentine Open Polo Championship, the most important global event of this discipline
La Bombonera during a night game of Copa Libertadores between Boca Juniors v. Colo Colo.
Luna Park

It takes its name from the city of Buenos Aires, the capital of the country, which used to be part of the province and the province's capital until it was federalized in 1880.

- Buenos Aires Province

The city of Buenos Aires is neither part of Buenos Aires Province nor the Province's capital; rather, it is an autonomous district.

- Buenos Aires

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Provinces of Argentina.

Provinces of Argentina

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Provinces of Argentina.
The Provinces of Argentina, their respective flags, their provincial capitals, and their largest cities.

Argentina is subdivided into twenty-three provinces (provincias singular provincia) and the autonomous city (ciudad autónoma) of Buenos Aires, which is the federal capital of the nation (Capital Federal) as decided by the Argentine Congress.

After seceding for a decade, Buenos Aires Province accepted the 1853 Constitution of Argentina in 1861, and its capital city was made a federal territory in 1880.

Juan Bautista Alberdi, the legal scholar who drafted the 1853 Constitution.

Constitution of Argentina

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Basic governing document of Argentina, and the primary source of existing law in Argentina.

Basic governing document of Argentina, and the primary source of existing law in Argentina.

Juan Bautista Alberdi, the legal scholar who drafted the 1853 Constitution.
"Nos los Representantes del Pueblo de la Nación Argentina …"
Congress building in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Consequently, the Province of Buenos Aires left the Argentine Confederation until 1859.

It also made Buenos Aires City an autonomous entity with its own authorities.

Combat of June 20: Barrancas Bridge's defence by the National Guard of Buenos Ayres.

Federalization of Buenos Aires

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Process of assigning federal status to a territory with the purpose of making that territory the national capital.

Process of assigning federal status to a territory with the purpose of making that territory the national capital.

Combat of June 20: Barrancas Bridge's defence by the National Guard of Buenos Ayres.
Battle of Los Corrales (June 21): Attack by national troops, near Corrales (Mataderos), defended by the National Guard of Buenos Ayres.

Federalization of Buenos Aires politically separated the city from the Buenos Aires Province to put it under direct control of the national government.

Governor Dardo Rocha (1838–1921), founder of La Plata.

La Plata

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Governor Dardo Rocha (1838–1921), founder of La Plata.
Cathedral of La Plata
Panoramic view of La Plata.
Railway station, La Plata.
Climogram
Casa de Gobierno de la Provincia de Buenos Aires.
Banco Provincia headquarters in La Plata.
Evolution of the population of La Plata from 1960 to 2001.
Presidencia de la UNLP.
Number 19 School Gral. José de San Martín.
The city from the air.
View of the City of La Plata and Plaza Moreno from the cathedral.
View of the Plaza Moreno and the cathedral.
Plaza Dardo Rocha from the air.
Courthouse.
Juzgados Federales de La Plata (ex Hotel Provincial).
Jacaranda foliage and blossom
Map of the Autódromo Roberto José Mouras track
Pasaje Dardo Rocha Building, named in honor of the city's founder.
Former building of the Teatro Argentino (burnt and demolished in 1977).
La Plata Museum of Natural History.
Doll winner 2008, "Arde Troya".
Curutchet House, World Heritage Site in La Plata
The city and vicinity at 8:19 PM locally on July 4, 2022, taken from the International Space Station.
The city and vicinity at 8:19 PM locally on July 4, 2022, taken from the International Space Station.

La Plata is the capital city of Buenos Aires Province, Argentina.

La Plata was planned and developed to serve as the provincial capital after the city of Buenos Aires was federalized in 1880.

Political division of the province and its capital La Plata (red dot)

Partidos of Buenos Aires

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Second-level administrative subdivision only in the.

Second-level administrative subdivision only in the.

Political division of the province and its capital La Plata (red dot)

The subdivision in partidos in Buenos Aires Province is distinct from all other provinces of Argentina, which call their second-level subdivisions departamento and are further subdivided into distinct municipalities.

By the end of 18th century the town council (cabildo) of Buenos Aires established the first partidos in the countryside: San Isidro del Pago de la Costa (San Isidro) in 1779 and San Vicente, Quilmes, Magdalena, La Matanza, Cañada de Morón (Morón), Las Conchas (Tigre) and San Pedro in 1784.

Republican Proposal

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Centre-right

Centre-right

Macri was re-elected Mayor of Buenos Aires together with María Eugenia Vidal as Vice-Chief of the city.
President Macri and Vicepresident Gabriela Michetti, in their Inauguration Ceremony in Argentine Parliament, on 10 December 2015

PRO has governed the Buenos Aires since 2007 and formed Cambiemos with the Radical Civic Union and the Civic Coalition ARI with which they won the 2015 general election.

For the 2009 legislative elections, De Narváez and Felipe Solá were the main candidates for national deputies for the Buenos Aires Province and defeated Nestor Kirchner.

Immigration to Argentina

Immigration to Argentina

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Immigration to Argentina began in several millennia BC with the arrival of cultures from Asia to the Americas through Beringia, according to the most accepted theories, and were slowly populating the Americas.

Immigration to Argentina began in several millennia BC with the arrival of cultures from Asia to the Americas through Beringia, according to the most accepted theories, and were slowly populating the Americas.

Immigration to Argentina
Immigrants' Hotel, Buenos Aires. Built in 1906, it could accommodate up to 4,000.
Copy of a colonization contract in the history museum of San José, Entre Ríos
European-born Argentines by provinces and territories (1914 Argentine Census).
A large immigration was experienced all over the country (except for the Northwest), which consisted overwhelmingly by Europeans in a 9/10 ratio. However, Neuquén and Corrientes had a small European population but a large South American immigration (particularly the former), mainly from Chile and Brazil, respectively. The Chaco region (North) had a moderate influx from Bolivia and Paraguay as well.
A statue honoring the immigrants, in Rosario

Spanish colonization between the 16th and 18th century, mostly male, largely assimilated with the natives through a process called miscegenation. Although, not all of the current territory was effectively colonized by the Spaniards. The Chaco region, Eastern Patagonia, the current province of La Pampa, the south zone of Córdoba, and the major part of the current provinces of Buenos Aires, San Luis, and Mendoza were maintained under indigenous dominance—Guaycurúes and Wichís from the Chaco region; Huarpes in the Cuyana and north Neuquino; Ranqueles in the east of Cuyo and north from the Pampean region; Tehuelches and Mapuches in the Pampean and Patagonian regions, and Selknam and Yámanas in de Tierra del Fuego archipelago—which were taken over by the Mapuches; first to the east of Cordillera de los Andes, mixing interracially with the Pehuenches in the middle of the 18th century and continuing until 1830 with the indigenous Pampas and north from Patagonia, which were conquered by the Argentine State after its independence.

Most immigrants arrived through the port of Buenos Aires and stayed in the capital or within Buenos Aires Province, as it still happens today.

María Eugenia Vidal

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Argentine politician who served as Governor of the Buenos Aires Province, being the first woman in the office, and the first non-Peronist since 1987.

Argentine politician who served as Governor of the Buenos Aires Province, being the first woman in the office, and the first non-Peronist since 1987.

Vidal and Basavilbaso visiting housing works

A member of Republican Proposal (PRO), she previously served as Social Development minister of the City of Buenos Aires, and in 2011 she was elected deputy mayor of the city under Mauricio Macri.

Vidal was fielded in the Republican Proposal (PRO) party list as a candidate for a seat in the Argentine Chamber of Deputies for Buenos Aires Province in 2005, though unsuccessfully; she was later elected to the Buenos Aires City Legislature.

Greater Buenos Aires

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Map of Greater Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires, city, and vicinities, Landsat 8 satellite image.
Greater Buenos Aires Metropolitan Rail Network.
Berazategui
Ciudad Evita (La Matanza Partido)
Florencio Varela
General San Martín
Monte Grande (Esteban Echeverría Partido)
Olivos (Vicente López Partido)
Quilmes
Tigre
Pan-American Expressway, north of Buenos Aires

Greater Buenos Aires (Gran Buenos Aires, GBA), also known as the Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area (Área Metropolitana de Buenos Aires, AMBA), refers to the urban agglomeration comprising the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires and the adjacent 24 partidos (districts) in the Province of Buenos Aires.

Del Parque station built in 1857, later closed in 1883.

Rail transport in Argentina

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The Argentine railway network consisted of a 47000 km network at the end of the Second World War and was, in its time, one of the most extensive and prosperous in the world.

The Argentine railway network consisted of a 47000 km network at the end of the Second World War and was, in its time, one of the most extensive and prosperous in the world.

Del Parque station built in 1857, later closed in 1883.
Advertisement for the Central Argentine Railway (1913).
Interior of Retiro railway station, then the central terminal of the Central Argentine Railway (1915).
Steam locomotive in Puerto Deseado, Santa Cruz Province (c.1920).
During the privatisation period, rail infrastructure deteriorated drastically.
The Once rail disaster left 49 dead and prompted calls for re-nationalisation.
Florencio Randazzo overseeing construction near Chascomús.
A Mitre Line electric rolling stock.
Map of the Buenos Aires Commuter Rail Network.
Constitución, second busiest rail station in the country.
A San Martín Line CSR SDD7 diesel-electric locomotive.
A tram running in Buenos Aires (c.1947).
Anchorena station on the Tren de la Costa light rail line.
An electric commuter rail train crossing a bridge over the Matanza River.
The new Roca Line EMUs are like those used on other lines, but using overhead lines instead of third rail.
La Plata railway station
Passengers boarding a Siemens–Duewag U2 in Mendoza.
A Materfer CMM 400-2 DMU crossing one of the Neuquén-Cipolletti bridges.
Rosario once had a 192 km network of trams.
Buenos Aires commuter rail network with the Red de Expresos Regionales tunnels completed.
Long distance CNR CKD8 passenger train on the General Roca Railway.
Argentina rail passenger services (interactive map)
Staff checking tickets in a pullman class carriage on a long distance train.
Retiro railway station in Buenos Aires.
Historic Tramway in Caballito, Buenos Aires.
Tren de las Sierras.
The Old Patagonian Express crossing the Río Chico.
"Polvorilla" viaduct used by the Tren a las Nubes.
A Nuevo Central Argentino freight train on the General Mitre Railway.
The 1970 accident in Benavídez is the worst in Argentina's history.
Flores railway station, location of the 2011 rail accident.
Exterior of Del Parque station (c.1857-84)
Railway strike on the Buenos Aires Northern Railway, the first British railway in Argentina (c.1904)
Buenos Aires and Pacific Railway train in Palermo (c.1930)
Comodoro Rivadavia Railway train in Patagonia (c.1940)
A Ferrocarriles Patagónicos Ganz DMU in Chubut province (1945)
Belgrano
Mitre
Roca
Sarmiento
San Martín
Urquiza
Argentine locomotive "La Justicialista" being inaugurated (1952)
Railway workers on the San Martín Line (1969)
Fiat Materfer 7131 units were emblematic of the 1960s
Ferrocarriles Argentinos rolling stock outside Retiro Mitre station (1968)
Ferrocarriles Argentinos poster from the 1970s
Ferrocarriles Argentinos train on the Urquiza Railway (1990)
An Emepa Alerce DMU
Commuter rail rolling stock
A Materfer CMM 400-2 on the Tren del Valle
EMD locomotives are widely used for freight
CNR CKD8 long distance rolling stock
A CSR SDD7 train on the San Martín Line
A Belgrano Sur Line CNR DMU
A Tecnotren railbus

Its expansion accelerated greatly due to the need for the transport of agricultural products and cattle in Buenos Aires Province.

Buenos Aires City's commuter rail provides 1800 trains carrying 1.4 million passengers each business day in the city of Buenos Aires, its suburbs in Greater Buenos Aires and several far-reaching satellite towns.