A report on Buenos Aires and Montevideo

Our Lady of Buen Aire in front of the National Migration Department
Cerro de Montevideo as seen from the city, in 1865.
Juan de Garay founding Buenos Aires in 1580. The initial settlement, founded by Pedro de Mendoza, had been abandoned since 1542.
17th century map of the Río de la Plata basin
Aldus verthoont hem de stadt Buenos Ayrros geleegen in Rio de la Plata, painting by a Dutch sailor who anchored at the port around 1628.
"Monte Video from the Anchorage outside the Harbour" by Emeric Essex Vidal (1820). The earliest securely dated picture of the city.
Emeric Essex Vidal, General view of Buenos Ayres from the Plaza de Toros, 1820. In this area now lies the Plaza San Martín.
Map of Montevideo during the Guerra Grande (1843–1851).
Impression of the Buenos Aires Cathedral by Carlos Pellegrini, 1829.
Plaza Independencia around 1900.
View of the Avenida de Mayo in 1915
A street in Montevideo's Ciudad Vieja.
Construction of the Obelisk of Buenos Aires on the 9 de Julio Avenue, 1936.
Map of Uruguay showing Montevideo on the Atlantic Ocean, between Argentina and Brazil
9 de Julio Avenue, 1986.
Sunset in Montevideo.
Catalinas Norte is an important business complex composed of nineteen commercial office buildings and occupied by numerous leading Argentine companies, foreign subsidiaries, and diplomatic offices. It is located in the Retiro and San Nicolás neighborhoods.
Map of the barrios of Montevideo
Satellite view of the Greater Buenos Aires area, and the Río de la Plata.
Palacio Salvo
Buenos Aires Botanical Garden
Pocitos is the most populous Montevideo neighborhood.
Heavy rain and thunderstorm in Plaza San Martin. Thunderstorms are usual during the summer.
The Legislative Palace.
The Buenos Aires City Hall in the right corner of the entrance to the Avenida de Mayo
World Trade Center Montevideo
Metropolitan Police of Buenos Aires City
Telecommunication Tower.
The Immigrants' Hotel, constructed in 1906, received and assisted the thousands of immigrants arriving to the city. The hotel is now a National Museum.
Plaza de la Constitución in winter
Villa 31, a villa miseria in Buenos Aires
Solís Theatre
The Metropolitan Cathedral is the main Catholic church in the city.
Monumento La Carreta
The Buenos Aires Stock Exchange, the main stock exchange and financial center of Argentina.
Obelisk of Montevideo in the Parque Batlle
Headquarters of the National Bank of Argentina, the national bank and the largest in the country's banking sector.
The Botanic Gardens of Parque Prado
Buenos Aires Bus, the city's tourist bus service. The official estimate is that the bus carries between 700 and 800 passengers per day, and has carried half a million passengers since its opening.
Parque Rodó.
Monument to the Carta Magna and Four Regions of Argentina in the neighborhood of Palermo
Fortaleza del Cerro
The Centro Cultural Kirchner (Kirchner Cultural Center), located at the former Central Post Office, is the largest of Latin America.
Punta Brava lighthouse.
Homage to Buenos Aires, a mural located at the Carlos Gardel station of the Buenos Aires Underground. It represents a typical scene from the city and several of its icons, such as singer Carlos Gardel, the Obelisco, the port, tango dancing and the Abasto market.
Fishermen in Punta Carretas.
Buenos Aires Museum of Modern Art.
Playa de los Pocitos
MALBA
Central Cemetery.
The interior of El Ateneo Grand Splendid, a celebrated bookstore located in the barrio of Recoleta.
Palacio Municipal, headquarters of the Intendencia.
Tango dancers during the World tango dance tournament.
Solis Theatre in Montevideo
The Buenos Aires Philharmonic.
Painter shop in Montevideo
Gaumont Cinema opened in 1912.
The poet Delmira Agustini.
A screening at Parque Centenario, as part of the 2011 edition of BAFICI
The writer Eduardo Galeano.
A fashion show at the Planetarium in 2013, as part of BAFWEEK.
Fountain in the entry of the Cabildo
View of Bolívar Street facing the Cabildo and Diagonal Norte, on Buenos Aires' historical center. The city's characteristic convergence of diverse architectural styles can be seen, including Spanish Colonial, Beaux-Arts and modernist architecture.
Uruguayan officials conversing at a meeting at the Palacio Taranco, 6 November 2010
Teatro Colón.
Museo Historico Nacional de Montevideo
Colegio Nacional de Buenos Aires, a public high school in Buenos Aires, and it is one of the most prestigious in Argentina and Latin America.
Museo Torres García
University of Buenos Aires' Law School in Recoleta
Museo Naval de Montevideo
July 9 Avenue
Montevideo Carnival: drummers
Aeroparque Jorge Newbery
"Zonal queens"
A Mitre Line Trenes Argentinos train in Retiro railway station
Estadio Centenario
Map of the Greater Buenos Aires Commuter Rail Network
Rugby in Montevideo
EcoBici.
Cathedral Interior
200 Series rolling stock at San José de Flores station, Buenos Aires Underground.
Punta Carretas Church
Buenos Aires Underground map
Montevideo's beach on the River Plate
Metrobus, Paseo del Bajo.
Hotel Casino Carrasco
Buquebus high-speed ferries connect Buenos Aires to Uruguay
Libertador Avenue
Campo Argentino de Polo, home of the Argentine Open Polo Championship, the most important global event of this discipline
TV reporter in Montevideo
La Bombonera during a night game of Copa Libertadores between Boca Juniors v. Colo Colo.
Estación Central General Artigas.
Luna Park
View of the new railway station
Carrasco International Airport.
Buquebus high-speed ferries connect Montevideo to Argentina
Port of Montevideo
Kindergarten kids at a public school in Montevideo
A laundress girl in a school play in Montevideo

Between 1680 and 1683, Portugal founded the city of Colonia do Sacramento in the region across the bay from Buenos Aires.

- Montevideo

In 1806 the British successfully invaded Buenos Aires, but an army from Montevideo led by Santiago de Liniers defeated them.

- Buenos Aires

20 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Uruguay

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Country in South America.

Country in South America.

Monument to the Charrúa, the indigenous people of Uruguay
The Portuguese established Colonia do Sacramento in 1680.
The oath of the Thirty-Three Orientals in 1825 prior to the beginning of the Cisplatine War, in which Uruguay gained independence from the Empire of Brazil
Manuel Oribe served as President of Uruguay and led the Blancos in the Civil War.
The victory of the Ejército Grande at the Battle of Caseros resulted in the overthrow of Juan Manuel de Rosas.
Uruguayan troops in trenches at the Battle of Tuyutí in 1866, during the War of the Triple Alliance
Palacio Salvo, built in Montevideo from 1925 to 1928, was once the tallest building in Latin America.
Former Uruguayan president Jorge Batlle with former U.S. president George H. W. Bush in 2003
2011 bicentennial celebrations at the Palacio Legislativo in Montevideo
A satellite image of Uruguay
Cerro Batoví in Tacuarembó Department
Lake at Iporá Resort in Tacuarembó
Köppen–Geiger climate classification map for Uruguay
Palacio Legislativo, Montevideo
Palacio Piria, seat of the supreme court
A map of the departments of Uruguay
Tabaré Vázquez (former two-term President 2005–2010, 2015–2020) with then-President of Brazil Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva in 2007
From right to left: Then-president José Mujica with his wife Lucía Topolansky and the former presidents of Uruguay Luis Alberto Lacalle, Jorge Batlle and Tabaré Vázquez in 2011
Current Uruguay's president Luis Lacalle Pou at a press conference, Apr. 22, 2022.
Uruguayan Army T-54 Main battle tank
GDP per capita development since 1900
A proportional representation of Uruguay exports, 2019
World Trade Center Montevideo
Vineyard in Uruguay
Punta del Este is one of the main tourist destinations in the Southern Cone.
The historic colonial city of Colonia del Sacramento
Port of Montevideo
Carrasco International Airport, Montevideo
Punta del Este International Airport
Population pyramid in 2020
The Church of Saint Charles Borromeo in San Carlos is one of the oldest churches in Uruguay.
Faculty of medicine of the University of the Republic, founded in 1849
A "livable sculpture", Carlos Páez Vilaró's Casapueblo was his home, hotel and museum.
Tango dancers in Montevideo
Murga singers at carnival
José Enrique Rodó
Centenario Stadium
Uruguay supporters at the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia

Uruguay covers an area of approximately 181,034 km2 and has a population of an estimated 3.51 million, of whom 2 million live in the metropolitan area of its capital and largest city, Montevideo.

Its natural harbor soon developed into a commercial area competing with Río de la Plata's capital, Buenos Aires.

Above: William Beresford surrenders to Santiago de Liniers (1806)

British invasions of the River Plate

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The British invasions of the River Plate were two unsuccessful British attempts to seize control of areas in the Spanish colony of the Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata that were located around the Río de la Plata in South America – in present-day Argentina and Uruguay.

The British invasions of the River Plate were two unsuccessful British attempts to seize control of areas in the Spanish colony of the Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata that were located around the Río de la Plata in South America – in present-day Argentina and Uruguay.

Above: William Beresford surrenders to Santiago de Liniers (1806)
River Plate, 1806
Portrait of Don Santiago de Liniers. Naval Museum of Madrid.
Sir William Beresford, commander of the British troops.
Lieutenant-General John Whitelocke, commander of the British forces in the second invasion.

A detachment from the British army occupied Buenos Aires for 46 days in 1806 before being expelled.

To deter Portuguese expansion, the Spanish founded Montevideo in 1726, and Colonia was finally ceded to Spain under the Treaty of San Ildefonso in 1777, one year after the creation of the Spanish Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata, the forerunner of modern Argentina.

Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata

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The last to be organized and also the shortest-lived of the Viceroyalties of the Spanish Empire in the Americas.

The last to be organized and also the shortest-lived of the Viceroyalties of the Spanish Empire in the Americas.

Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata and de jure extension (light green)
Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata and de jure extension (light green)
Spanish and Portuguese empires in 1790.
Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata and de jure extension (light green)
Viceroyalty of the Río de La Plata administrative divisions

Buenos Aires, located on the western shore of the Río de la Plata estuary flowing into the Atlantic Ocean, opposite the Portuguese outpost of Colonia del Sacramento, was chosen as the capital.

It resulted in encouraging widespread contraband activities in the eastern region, especially in Asunción, Buenos Aires and Montevideo.

Río de la Plata

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Estuary formed by the confluence of the Uruguay River and the Paraná River at Punta Gorda.

Estuary formed by the confluence of the Uruguay River and the Paraná River at Punta Gorda.

Río de la Plata in Argentina
Satellite image of the Paraná and Uruguay rivers emptying into the Río de la Plata. Due to the relatively calm surface of the estuary and the angle of the Sun relative to the satellite, the current of the river flowing out into the Atlantic is visible.
Discovery of the Río de la Plata by Juan Díaz de Solís. He would be attacked and killed by Charrúas later.
The city of Buenos Aires sits along the southern coast of the Río de la Plata.
The naval battle during the Argentine-Brazilian War, 1827

The name Río de la Plata is also used to refer to the populations along the estuary, especially the main port cities of Buenos Aires and Montevideo, where Ríoplatense Spanish is spoken and tango culture developed.

An updated Köppen–Geiger climate map

Köppen climate classification

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One of the most widely used climate classification systems.

One of the most widely used climate classification systems.

An updated Köppen–Geiger climate map
Tropical climate distribution
Dry climate distribution
Temperate climate distribution
Continental climate distribution
The snowy city of Sapporo
Polar climate distribution
North America
Europe
Russia
Central Asia
East Asia
South America
Africa
Western Asia
South Asia
Southeast Asia
Melanesia/Oceania
Australia
New Zealand
Tropical climate distribution

Buenos Aires, Argentina (Cfa)

Montevideo, Uruguay (Cfa)

Asunción

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Capital and the largest city of Paraguay in South America.

Capital and the largest city of Paraguay in South America.

Cabildo of Asunción in 1854
View of the city of Asunción during the Paraguayan War.
Six districts of the city of Asunción
Neighborhoods of Asunción
Universidad Americana
Main access roads
Asunción's Línea 23 bus.
Silvio Pettirossi International Airport
Traditional buildings in Calle Palma
The National Pantheon of Heroes is one of the most significant buildings in Asunción
The Estadio Defensores del Chaco is the largest stadium in Paraguay
Asunción's Downtown in 1872
A tram in the city centre in 1986. The tram system closed in the late 1990s.
Asunción at night
Downtown Asunción. Being one of the oldest national capitals in the Americas, the Loma San Jerónimo neighborhood is the city's most traditional one.<ref>{{cite web|title=Barrio Loma San Jerónimo, Asunción|url=https://www.bienvenidoaparaguay.com/showdata.php?xmlcity=9&xmldestino=108|website=bienvenidoaparaguay.com.py|publisher=Bienvenido a Paraguay|language=es|date=2022-03-22|access-date=2022-03-22|archive-date=17 December 2021|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211217052915/https://www.bienvenidoaparaguay.com/showdata.php?xmlcity=9&xmldestino=108|url-status=live}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|title=Biografías de Asunción - Loma San Jerónimo|url=https://www.asuncion.gov.py/campanas/biografias-de-asuncion/biografias-de-asuncion-loma-san-jeronimo|website=asuncion.gov.py|publisher=Municipalidad de Asunción|language=es|date=2020-08-13|access-date=2022-03-22|archive-date=20 December 2020|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211217052915/https://www.asuncion.gov.py/campanas/biografias-de-asuncion/biografias-de-asuncion-loma-san-jeronimo|url-status=live}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|title=Loma San Jeronimo|url=https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g294080-d4454310-Reviews-Loma_San_Jeronimo-Asuncion.html|website=tripadvisor.com|publisher=Tripadvisor|language=en|date=2022-03-22|access-date=2022-03-22|archive-date=22 March 2022|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211217052915/https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g294080-d4454310-Reviews-Loma_San_Jeronimo-Asuncion.html|url-status=live}}</ref>
A picture of Microcentro de Asunción (Old town Asunción), featuring the port of the city, one of the most important in Paraguay.<ref>{{cite web|title=Puerto ASU|url=https://www.mopc.gov.py/index.php/noticias/tag/puerto%20de%20asunci%C3%B3n|website=mopc.gov.py|publisher=Gobierno Nacional (Paraguay)|language=es|date=2022-03-22|access-date=2022-03-22|archive-date=17 December 2021|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211217052915/https://www.mopc.gov.py/index.php/noticias/tag/puerto%20de%20asunci%C3%B3n|url-status=live}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|title=Puerto de Asunción, una conexión con nuestra historia|url=https://www.mopc.gov.py/index.php/noticias/el-puerto-de-asuncion-una-conexion-con-nuestra-historia|website=mopc.gov.py|publisher=Gobierno Nacional (Paraguay)|language=es|date=2021-12-07|access-date=2022-03-22|archive-date=17 December 2021|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211217052915/https://www.mopc.gov.py/index.php/noticias/el-puerto-de-asuncion-una-conexion-con-nuestra-historia|url-status=live}}</ref>
Asunción, seen from the International Space Station
Costanera Avenue, Asunción
Democracy Square, Asunción, Paraguay

From Asunción, Spanish colonial expeditions departed to found other cities, including the second foundation of Buenos Aires, that of other important cities such as Villarrica, Corrientes, Santa Fe, Córdoba, Santa Cruz de la Sierra and 65 more.

🇺🇾 Montevideo, Uruguay

The rule of Joseph Bonaparte as King of Spain was resisted by Spaniards, and cast doubts on the legitimacy of the Spanish viceroys.

May Revolution

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The rule of Joseph Bonaparte as King of Spain was resisted by Spaniards, and cast doubts on the legitimacy of the Spanish viceroys.
The US Declaration of Independence inspired similar movements in the Spanish colonies in South America.
William Carr Beresford surrenders to Santiago de Liniers during the British invasions of the Río de la Plata.
The coronation of Infanta Carlota Joaquina was considered an alternative to revolution.
Santiago de Liniers ruled as viceroy between 1807 and 1809.
Baltasar Hidalgo de Cisneros, the last viceroy to rule in Buenos Aires.
Map of Cádiz during the French siege.
Secret meeting of the revolutionaries at the house of Nicolás Rodríguez Peña.
Juan José Castelli asks Baltasar Hidalgo de Cisneros for an open cabildo.
Invitation to the open cabildo of May 22
An open cabildo discussed the legitimacy of the viceroy and the new local government that replaced him.
The proposal of Cornelio Saavedra got the majority of votes.
The people gathered in front of the Buenos Aires Cabildo
Members of the Primera Junta
The Primera Junta ruled after the revolution.
Mariano Moreno was an influential member of the Primera Junta.
Bartolomé Mitre wrote one of the first historical interpretations of the May Revolution.
The revolutionaries of the May Revolution declared loyalty to Ferdinand VII of Spain.
The May Pyramid, commemorative monument at Plaza de Mayo

The May Revolution (Revolución de Mayo) was a week-long series of events that took place from May 18 to 25, 1810, in Buenos Aires, capital of the Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata.

Buenos Aires and Montevideo were captured and recaptured during the British invasions.

Portrait of Liniers, Museo Naval de Madrid

Santiago de Liniers, 1st Count of Buenos Aires

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French officer in the Spanish military service, and a viceroy of the Spanish colonies of the Viceroyalty of the River Plate.

French officer in the Spanish military service, and a viceroy of the Spanish colonies of the Viceroyalty of the River Plate.

Portrait of Liniers, Museo Naval de Madrid
William Carr Beresford surrenders to Santiago de Liniers during the British invasions of the River Plate, painting by Charles Fouqueray.
Liniers house in Buenos Aires
Execution of Santiago de Liniers.
Museum at the former house of Liniers, at Alta Gracia, Córdoba.

Needing new markets, Britain invaded Buenos Aires and Montevideo, two Spanish colonies in South America (Spain was allied to France in the war).

Punta del Este

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City and seaside resort on the Atlantic Coast in the Maldonado Department of southeastern Uruguay.

City and seaside resort on the Atlantic Coast in the Maldonado Department of southeastern Uruguay.

Chiverta Ave. from Playa Brava (Rough Sea Beach) to Playa Mansa (back). Gorriti Island.
Playa El Emir.
Manantiales Beach at the sunset
The fingers of Punta del Este.
Lighthouse of Punta del Este
Sea lions on Isla de Lobos (Isle of Wolves)
Capitán de Corbeta Carlos A. Curbelo International Airport.
The 2014 Punta del Este ePrix was the first race of the Formula E history in the Americas.

The city is located on the intersection of Route 10 with Route 39, southeast of the department capital Maldonado and about 140 km east of Montevideo.

Punta del Este can be reached from Buenos Aires by ferryboat to Montevideo (the capital city), 140 km from Punta del Este, and then by car or bus.

Latin America

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Cultural region of the Americas comprising multiple nation-states where Romance languages—languages that derived from Latin, i.e., Spanish, Portuguese, and French–are predominantly spoken.

Cultural region of the Americas comprising multiple nation-states where Romance languages—languages that derived from Latin, i.e., Spanish, Portuguese, and French–are predominantly spoken.

Presencia de América Latina (Presence of Latin America, 1964–65) is a 300. sqm mural at the hall of the Arts House of the University of Concepción, Chile. It is also known as Latin America's Integration.
The four common subregions in Latin America
Mayan UNESCO World Heritage Site of Chichén Itzá
A view of UNESCO World Heritage Site of Machu Picchu, a pre-Columbian Inca site in Peru.
Surviving section of the Inca road system in Northwestern Argentina, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The road system linked the Andean empire
Cristóbal de Olid leads Spanish soldiers with Tlaxcalan allies against Indigenous warriors during the European colonization of the Americas.
Map of Brazil showing Indigenous men cutting brazilwood and Portuguese ships
Areas claimed by the Spanish and Portuguese empires in 1790.
Potosí, the "cerro rico" that produced massive amounts of silver from a single site. The first image published in Europe. Pedro Cieza de León, 1553.
Sugar processing by skilled black slave laborers. Sugar cane must be processed immediately once cut in order to capture the most sugar juice, so engenhos needed to be constructed near fields.
Monument to Christopher Columbus, Buenos Aires before its 2013 removal and replaced by the statue of Juana Azurduy, a mestiza fighter for independence.
Development of Spanish American Independence
Ferdinand VII of Spain in whose name Spanish American juntas ruled during his exile 1808–1814; when restored to power in 1814, he reinstated autocratic rule, renewing independence movements
Constitution of 1812
Dom Pedro I, emperor of Brazil
Linguistic map of Latin America. Spanish in green, Portuguese in orange, and French in blue.
Argentine caudillo Juan Manuel de Rosas
Mexican strongman Antonio López de Santa Anna
Emperor Pedro II of Brazil
American occupation of Mexico City
The Execution of Emperor Maximilian, Édouard Manet 1868. The execution ended monarchic rule in Mexico, and Mexican liberals triumphed
A poster used in Japan to attract immigrants to Brazil. It reads: "Let’s go to South America with families."
The Zimmermann Telegram as it was sent from Washington to Ambassador Heinrich von Eckardt (German ambassador to Mexico)
U.S. President Roosevelt and Mexican President Manuel Avila Camacho, Monterrey, Mexico 1943. Roosevelt sought strong ties between the U.S. and Latin America in the World War II era
Agrarian reform poster, Guatemala 1952
Fidel Castro and his men in the Sierra Maestra, 2 December 1956
Cuba-Russia friendship poster, with Castro and Nikita Khrushchev
Che Guevara Cuban revolutionary poster
Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet and U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger
The name Augusto Sandino, Nicaraguan nationalist hero for his struggle against the United States, was taken by leftist guerrillas as the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN).
Exhumation of corpses in the aftermath of the Guatemalan genocide
Pope Paul VI and Salvadoran cleric Oscar Romero (now St Oscar Romero)
Calls for justice in the wake of the Guatemalan genocide
Roll-on/roll-off
ships, such as this one pictured here at Miraflores locks, are among the largest ships to pass through the Panama Canal. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade.
Comandanta Ramona of the Zapatista Army of National Liberation, Mexico
UNASUR summit in the Palacio de la Moneda, Santiago de Chile
Honduran demonstrator holding a banner with a "don't turn left" sign, 2009.
Eighteenth-century Mexican Casta painting showing 16 castas hierarchically arranged. Ignacio Maria Barreda, 1777. Real Academia Española de la Lengua, Madrid.
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The Las Lajas Sanctuary in the southern Colombia, Department of Nariño.
World map indicating literacy rate by country in 2015 (2015 CIA World Factbook). Grey = no data.
2012 map of countries by homicide rate. As of 2015, the Latin American countries with the highest rates were El Salvador (108.64 per 100,000 people), Honduras (63.75) and Venezuela (57.15). The countries with the lowest rates were Chile (3.59), Cuba (4.72) and Argentina (6.53).
Sumidero Canyon, located in Chiapas, Mexico.
Glaucous macaw (behind hyacinth macaw) and other macaws. Macaws are long-tailed, often colorful New World parrots.
Sugarcane plantation in São Paulo. In 2018, Brazil was the world's largest producer, with 746 million tons. Latin America produces more than half of the world's sugarcane.
Soybean plantation in Mato Grosso. In 2020, Brazil was the world's largest producer, with 130 million tons. Latin America produces half of the world's soybeans.
Coffee in Minas Gerais. In 2018, Brazil was the world's largest producer, with 3.5 million tons. Latin America produces half of the world's coffee.
Oranges in São Paulo. In 2018, Brazil was the world's largest producer, with 17 million tons. Latin America produces 30% of the world's oranges.
Truck of a meat company in Brazil. Latin America produces 25% of the world's beef and chicken meat.
Chile is a first world producer of copper.
Cerro Rico, Potosi, Bolivia, still a major silver mine
Amethyst mine in Ametista do Sul. Latin America is a major producer of gems such as amethyst, topaz, emeralds, aquamarine and tourmaline
Iron mine in Minas Gerais. Brazil is the world's second largest iron ore exporter.
Braskem, the largest Brazilian chemical industry
EMS, the largest Brazilian pharmaceutical industry
Panama Canal expansion project; New Agua Clara locks (Atlantic side)
Rodovia dos Bandeirantes, Brazil
Ruta 9 / 14, in Zarate, Argentina
General Rafael Urdaneta Bridge
Mexico City International Airport
Port of Itajaí, Santa Catarina, Brazil
Itaipu Dam in Paraná.
Wind power in Parnaíba.
Angra Nuclear Power Plant in Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro
Pirapora Solar Complex, the largest in Brazil and Latin America with a capacity of 321 MW.
Native New World crops exchanged globally: maize, tomato, potato, vanilla, rubber, cocoa, tobacco
Rafael Correa, Evo Morales, Néstor Kirchner, Cristina Fernández, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, Nicanor Duarte, and Hugo Chávez at the signing of the founding charter of the Bank of the South
Aerial view of Cancún. Mexico is the most visited country in Latin America and 6th in the world.
Roman Catholic Easter procession in Comayagua, Honduras
Nicaraguan women wearing the Mestizaje costume, which is a traditional costume worn to dance the Mestizaje dance. The costume demonstrates the Spanish influence upon Nicaraguan clothing.
Diego Rivera's mural depicting Mexico's history at the National Palace in Mexico City
Mural by Santiago Martinez Delgado at the Colombian Congress
The Guadalajara International Film Festival is considered the most prestigious film festival in Latin America.
In 2015, Alejandro González Iñárritu became the second Mexican director in a row to win both the Academy Award for Best Director and the Directors Guild of America Award for Best Director. He won his second Oscar in 2016 for The Revenant.
President Cristina Fernández with the film director Juan José Campanella and the cast of The Secret in Their Eyes (2009) with the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film
Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz in 1772 by Andrés de Islas
Argentine Jorge Luis Borges in L'Hôtel, Paris in 1969
Chilean poet Gabriela Mistral, first Latin American to win a Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1945
García Márquez signing a copy of One Hundred Years of Solitude
Salsa dancing in Cali, Colombia
Traditional Mexican dance Jarabe Tapatío
Brazilian singer Carmen Miranda helped popularize samba internationally.
A couple dances tango.
Simón Bolívar, Liberator of Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Peru and Panama
José de San Martín, Liberator of Argentina, Chile and Peru.
Bernardo O'Higgins, hero of Chilean independence
Father Miguel Hidalgo, father of Mexican independence, with the banner of Our Lady of Guadalupe
Vicente Guerrero, insurgent hero of Mexican independence, who joined with Iturbide
Agustín de Iturbide, former royal military officer who brought about Mexican independence and was crowned emperor

An example of the new consciousness was the dismantling of the Christopher Columbus monument in Buenos Aires, one of many in the hemisphere, mandated by leftist President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner.

The Cisplatine War erupted in 1814 and ended in 1828, resulting in occupation and further secession of Provincia Oriental which in 1830 became the modern Republic of Uruguay with a central government in Montevideo.