The Codex Zographensis is one of the oldest manuscripts in the Old Bulgarian language, dated from the late 10th or early 11th century
Cyrillic
Second Bulgarian Empire under Ivan Asen II
Map of the Bulgarian dialects within Bulgaria
Second Bulgarian Empire under Ivan Asen II
Extent of Bulgarian dialects according to the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences shown encompassing the Eastern South Slavic dialects. Subregions are differentiated by pronunciation of man and tooth.
The Church of St Demetrius in Tarnovo, built by Asen and Peter in the beginning of the uprising
Areas of Eastern South Slavic languages.
Second Bulgarian Empire under Ivan Asen II
Bulgarian cursive alphabet
A map of the Bulgarian Empire, showing territorial extent and the campaigns between 1185 and 1197
The Church of the Holy Forty Martyrs where Kaloyan was buried.
A map showing the greatest territorial extension of the Second Bulgarian Empire during the reign of Ivan Asen II (1218–1241)
Emperor Constantine Tikh and his first wife Irene, fresco from the Boyana Church
Bulgaria under Theodore Svetoslav (1300-1322)
The fortress of Baba Vida in Vidin
Second Bulgarian Empire, 1331-71
The defeat of the anti-Ottoman coalition in the battle of Nicopolis in 1396 was the final blow leading to the fall of the Bulgarian Empire.
The Medieval Bulgarian royal charters, such as the Rila Charter of Ivan Shishman issued in 1378, are an important source on medieval Bulgarian society and administrative posts.
Panoramic view of Tarnovo, the capital of the Second Bulgarian Empire
Aerial view of the Shumen fortress, an important stronghold in eastern Bulgaria
A silver vessel from the 14th century Nikopol treasure
Economy of the Second Bulgarian Empire
Coin depicting Ivan Alexander with one of his sons, co-emperor Michael Asen IV (right)
The Patriarchal Cathedral of the Holy Ascension of God in Tarnovo was the seat of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church during the Second Empire. It was part of a larger complex which accommodated the Patriarch.
A depiction of emperor Ivan Alexander, patron of Hesychasm
The Church of the Holy Mother of God in Donja Kamenica
Culture of the Second Bulgarian Empire
The ruins of a noble family's house in Tarnovo
A depiction of Kaloyan and Desislava, ktitors of the Boyana Church
Frescos in the Rock-hewn Churches of Ivanovo
A page of the 14th century Tetraevangelia of Ivan Alexander
A page of the 14th century Bulgarian translation of the Manasses Chronicle
Pontic littoral's city and flags of Second Bulgarian Empire (Bulgarian rulers Shishman) on vexilographic maps by the end of the 13th – 17th centuries

The Second Bulgarian Empire (Middle Bulgarian: Ц(а)рьство бл(ъ)гарское; Modern Bulgarian: Второ българско царство, Vtorо Balgarskо Tsarstvo) was a medieval Bulgarian state that existed between 1185 and 1396.

- Second Bulgarian Empire

Middle Bulgarian (12th to 15th centuries) – a literary norm that evolved from the earlier Old Bulgarian, after major innovations occurred. A language of rich literary activity, it served as the official administration language of the Second Bulgarian Empire.

- Bulgarian language
The Codex Zographensis is one of the oldest manuscripts in the Old Bulgarian language, dated from the late 10th or early 11th century

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Officers from Bulgarian hussar regiment in Russia (1776–1783)

Bulgarians

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Bulgarians (българи, ) are a nation and South Slavic ethnic group native to Bulgaria and Southeastern Europe.

Bulgarians (българи, ) are a nation and South Slavic ethnic group native to Bulgaria and Southeastern Europe.

Officers from Bulgarian hussar regiment in Russia (1776–1783)
Cyrillic alphabet of the medieval Old Bulgarian language
Map of the Bulgarian Exarchate (1870–1913). The Ottomans required a threshold of two thirds of positive votes of the Orthodox population to include a region into this jurisdiction.
Bulgarian peach kompot – non alcoholic clear juice obtained by cooking fruit
Kukeri from the area of Burgas
Girls celebrating Lazaruvane from Gabrа, Sofia Province
Map of A. Scobel, Andrees Allgemeiner Handatlas, 1908
Distribution of the Balkan peoples in 1911, Encyclopædia Britannica
Ethnic groups in the Balkans and Asia Minor by William R. Shepherd, 1911
Distribution of European peoples in 1914 according to L. Ravenstein
Swiss ethnographic map of Europe published in 1918 by Juozas Gabrys
Percentage of Pomaks by first language according to the 1965 Census excluding Bulgarian
Distribution of Bulgarians in Odessa Oblast, Ukraine according to the 2001 census
Distribution of Bulgarians by first language in Zaporizhzhia Oblast, Ukraine according to the 2001 census
Distribution of predominant ethnic groups in Bulgaria according to the 2011 census
Distribution of Bulgarians in Romania according to the 2002 census
Distribution of Bulgarians in Moldova according to the 2004 census
Map of the Bulgarian diaspora in the world (includes people with Bulgarian ancestry or citizenship). 
Bulgaria
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The establishment of a new state molded the various Slav, Bulgar and earlier or later populations into the "Bulgarian people" of the First Bulgarian Empire speaking a South Slavic language.

In 1018 Bulgaria lost its independence and remained a Byzantine subject until 1185, when the Second Bulgarian Empire was created.

Sofia

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Capital and largest city of Bulgaria.

Capital and largest city of Bulgaria.

The first seal of the city from 1878 which calls it Sredets
O: head of river-god Strymon
R: trident 
This coin imitates Macedonian issue from 187 to 168 BC. It was struck by Serdi tribe as their own currency
The eastern gate of Serdica in the "Complex Ancient Serdica"
Dated from the early 4th century, the Church of Saint George is the oldest standing edifice in Sofia
The 13th century lord of Sredets Kaloyan and his wife Desislava, Boyana Church
Sofia in mid-19th-century
The allied bombing of Sofia in World War II in 1944
A view over central Sofia, with the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in the foreground and Vitosha in the distance
Interior of the ancient Saint Sofia Church.
Neoclassical architecture, Poligrafia office center.
Borisova gradina.
A map of the 24 districts of Sofia
The National Assembly building.
The Council of Ministers (left), Presidency (right) and the former Communist Party House.
Ivan Vazov National Theatre
The Museum of Contemporary Art
Interior of the medieval Boyana Church
The Banya Bashi Mosque an example of Ottoman architecture.
Vitosha Boulevard, the main shopping street in the city
Armeets Arena during the ATP Sofia Open
Students of the National Academy of Arts (circa 1952–53). People aged 20–25 years have been the most numerous group in the city since the process of Bulgarian urbanisation
Business Park Sofia
A Siemens Desiro train of the Bulgarian State Railways at the Central Railway Station
Cherni Vrah Boulevard
The Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy of Sofia University

In 1018, the Byzantines ended Bulgarian rule until 1194, when it was reincorporated by the reborn Bulgarian Empire.

Amongst others, the population consisted of Muslims, Bulgarian and Greek speaking Orthodox Christians, Armenians, Georgians, Catholic Ragusans, Jews (Romaniote, Ashkenazi and Sephardi), and Romani people.

Middle Bulgarian

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Middle Bulgarian language was the lingua franca and the most widely spoken language of the Second Bulgarian Empire.

Being descended from Old Bulgarian, Middle Bulgarian eventually developed into modern Bulgarian language by the 16th century.