A report on Bulgarians

Officers from Bulgarian hussar regiment in Russia (1776–1783)
Cyrillic alphabet of the medieval Old Bulgarian language
Map of the Bulgarian Exarchate (1870–1913). The Ottomans required a threshold of two thirds of positive votes of the Orthodox population to include a region into this jurisdiction.
Bulgarian peach kompot – non alcoholic clear juice obtained by cooking fruit
Kukeri from the area of Burgas
Girls celebrating Lazaruvane from Gabrа, Sofia Province
Map of A. Scobel, Andrees Allgemeiner Handatlas, 1908
Distribution of the Balkan peoples in 1911, Encyclopædia Britannica
Ethnic groups in the Balkans and Asia Minor by William R. Shepherd, 1911
Distribution of European peoples in 1914 according to L. Ravenstein
Swiss ethnographic map of Europe published in 1918 by Juozas Gabrys
Percentage of Pomaks by first language according to the 1965 Census excluding Bulgarian
Distribution of Bulgarians in Odessa Oblast, Ukraine according to the 2001 census
Distribution of Bulgarians by first language in Zaporizhzhia Oblast, Ukraine according to the 2001 census
Distribution of predominant ethnic groups in Bulgaria according to the 2011 census
Distribution of Bulgarians in Romania according to the 2002 census
Distribution of Bulgarians in Moldova according to the 2004 census
Map of the Bulgarian diaspora in the world (includes people with Bulgarian ancestry or citizenship). 
Bulgaria
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Bulgarians (българи, ) are a nation and South Slavic ethnic group native to Bulgaria and Southeastern Europe.

- Bulgarians
Officers from Bulgarian hussar regiment in Russia (1776–1783)

82 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Bulgaria

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Country in Southeast Europe.

Country in Southeast Europe.

Odrysian golden wreath in the National History Museum
Knyaz Boris I meeting the disciples of Saints Cyril and Methodius.
The walls of Tsarevets fortress in Veliko Tarnovo, the capital of the second empire
The Battle of Nicopolis in 1396 marked the end of medieval Bulgarian statehood.
The Russo-Bulgarian defence of Shipka Pass in 1877
Borders of Bulgaria according to the preliminary Treaty of San Stefano
Tsar Boris III
Georgi Dimitrov, leader of the Bulgarian Communist Party from 1946 to 1949
Topography of Bulgaria
Bulgarian Black Sea Coast
The Pirin mountain range
Lacerta viridis in Ropotamo, one of Bulgaria's 16 biosphere reserves
Independence Square in Sofia: The headquarters of the Presidency (right), the National Assembly (centre) and the Council of Ministers (left).
Mikoyan MiG-29 jet fighters of the Bulgarian Air Force
Historical development of GDP per capita
Economic growth (green) and unemployment (blue) statistics since 2001
Tree map of Bulgarian exports in 2016
The launch of BulgariaSat-1 by SpaceX
Trakia motorway
Population trend since 1960
Population pyramid of Bulgaria in 2017
The Rectorate of Sofia University
Kuker in Lesichovo
Christo's Mastaba in Hyde Park, London
Grigor Dimitrov at the 2015 Italian Open
Alexander Nevsky Cathedral, Sofia

The Thracians, one of the three primary ancestral groups of modern Bulgarians, appeared on the Balkan Peninsula some time before the 12th century BC. The Thracians excelled in metallurgy and gave the Greeks the Orphean and Dionysian cults, but remained tribal and stateless.

First Bulgarian Empire in 850

First Bulgarian Empire

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First Bulgarian Empire in 850
First Bulgarian Empire in 850
Slavic tribes and states in Early Middle Ages
The Bulgar colonies after the fall of Old Great Bulgaria in the 7th century.
Zones of control by Slavic tribes and Bulgars in the late 7th century
Part of the Pliska fortress.
Territorial expansion during the reign of Krum
Bulgaria under Presian
Bulgarian Empire during the reign of Simeon I
Emperor Simeon I: The Morning Star of Slavonic Literature, painting by Alfons Mucha
Bulgaria under the rule of Emperor Samuel
Samuel's Fortress in Ohrid
Above: The Byzantines defeat Samuel at Kleidion; below: the death of Samuel, Manasses Chronicle
Khan Omurtag was the first Bulgarian ruler known to have claimed divine origin, Madrid Skylitzes
The symbol ıYı is associated with the Dulo clan and the First Empire
A replica of a Bulgarian sabre found near the town of Varbitsa
A battle scene of the Byzantine–Bulgarian war of 894–896, Madrid Skylitzes
A pendant of the Preslav treasure
Slavic mythology: Sadko (1876) by Ilya Repin
The Pliska rosette dated from the pagan period has seven fingers representing the Classical planets
Bulgarian soldiers kill Christians during the persecutions, Menologion of Basil II
Baptism of Boris I and his court, painting by Nikolai Pavlovich
A medieval icon of Saint Clement of Ohrid, a high-ranking official of the Bulgarian Church, scholar, writer and enlightener of the Bulgarians and the Slavs
Expansion of Bogomilism in medieval Europe
Culture of the First Bulgarian Empire
The ruins of Pliska, the first capital of Bulgaria
The Madara Rider
Early Christian reliefs
Ceramic icon of Saint Theodore, Preslav ceramics, c. 900.
The Old Bulgarian alphabet
A page with the Alphabet Prayer by Constantine of Preslav

The First Bulgarian Empire (блъгарьско цѣсарьствиѥ; Първо българско царство) was a medieval Bulgar-Slavic and later Bulgarian state that existed in Southeastern Europe between the 7th and 11th centuries AD. It was founded in 680–681 after part of the Bulgars, led by Asparuh, moved south to the northeastern Balkans.

South Slavs

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South Slavs are Slavic peoples who speak South Slavic languages and inhabit a contiguous region of Southeast Europe comprising the eastern Alps and the Balkan Peninsula.

South Slavs are Slavic peoples who speak South Slavic languages and inhabit a contiguous region of Southeast Europe comprising the eastern Alps and the Balkan Peninsula.

Admixture analysis of autosomal SNPs of the Balkan region in a global context on the resolution level of 7 assumed ancestral populations: the African (brown), South/West European (light blue), Asian (yellow), Middle Eastern (orange), South Asian (green), North/East European (dark blue) and beige Caucasus component.
Autosomal analysis presenting the historical contribution of different donor groups in some European populations. Polish sample was selected to represent the Slavic influence, and it is suggesting a strong and early impact in Greece (30-37%), Romania (48-57%), Bulgaria (55-59%), and Hungary (54-84%).

Geographically separated from the West Slavs and East Slavs by Austria, Hungary, Romania, and the Black Sea, the South Slavs today include Bosniaks, Bulgarians, Croats, Macedonians, Montenegrins, Serbs, and Slovenes, respectively the main populations of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, North Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, and Slovenia.

The Codex Zographensis is one of the oldest manuscripts in the Old Bulgarian language, dated from the late 10th or early 11th century

Bulgarian language

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South Slavic language spoken in Southeastern Europe, primarily in Bulgaria.

South Slavic language spoken in Southeastern Europe, primarily in Bulgaria.

The Codex Zographensis is one of the oldest manuscripts in the Old Bulgarian language, dated from the late 10th or early 11th century
Cyrillic
Map of the Bulgarian dialects within Bulgaria
Extent of Bulgarian dialects according to the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences shown encompassing the Eastern South Slavic dialects. Subregions are differentiated by pronunciation of man and tooth.
Areas of Eastern South Slavic languages.
Bulgarian cursive alphabet

It is the language of the Bulgarians.

Map of the Macedonian diaspora in the world

Macedonians (ethnic group)

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Macedonians (Македонци) are a nation and a South Slavic ethnic group native to the region of Macedonia in Southeast Europe.

Macedonians (Македонци) are a nation and a South Slavic ethnic group native to the region of Macedonia in Southeast Europe.

Map of the Macedonian diaspora in the world
Georgi Pulevski is the first known person, who in 1875 put forward the idea on the existence of a separate (Slavic) Macedonian language and ethnicity.
Krste Misirkov is the first person who in 1903 attempted to codify a standard Macedonian language and appealed for eventual recognition of a separate Macedonian nation when the necessary historical circumstances would arise.
Dimitar Vlahov played a crucial role for the adaptation of the Resolution of the Comintern on the Macedonian question that first of all recognized the existence of a separate Macedonian nation in 1934.
Metodija Andonov-Čento was the first president of the Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia after the Second World War.
Kiro Gligorov was the first president of the Republic of Macedonia (now North Macedonia) after the breakup of Yugoslavia in 1991.
Ottoman architecture in Ohrid.
Macedonian girls in traditional folk costumes.
One of the well-known monasteries – St. Panteleimon in Ohrid.
Tavče Gravče, the national dish of Macedonians.
Flag of the Republic of Macedonia (1992–1995) depicting the Vergina Sun
Macedonians in North Macedonia, according to the 2002 census
Concentration of Macedonians in Serbia
Regions where Macedonians live within Albania
Macedonian Muslims in North Macedonia
Austrian ethnographic map of the vilayets of Kosovo, Saloniki, Scutari, Janina and Monastir, ca. 1900.
Ethnographic map of the Balkans from the Serbian author Jovan Cvijic (1918)
Greek map by Georgios Sotiriadis submitted to the Paris Peace Conference (1919)
thumb|Ethnographic map of the Balkans in the New Larned History (1922)

Throughout the Middle Ages and Ottoman rule up until the early 20th century the Slavic-speaking population majority in the region of Macedonia were more commonly referred to (both by themselves and outsiders) as Bulgarians.

Slavs

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Slavs are the largest European ethnolinguistic group.

Slavs are the largest European ethnolinguistic group.

The origin and migration of Slavs in Europe between the 5th and 10th centuries AD:
Terracotta tile from the 6th–7th century AD found in Vinica, North Macedonia depicts a battle scene between the Bulgars and Slavs with the Latin inscription BOLGAR and SCLAVIGI
Slavic tribes from the 7th to 9th centuries AD in Europe
Great Moravia was one of the first major Slavic states, 833–907 AD
Seal from the pan-Slavic Congress held in Prague, 1848
The "Zbruch Idol" preserved at the Kraków Archaeological Museum
First Bulgarian Empire, the Bulgars were a Turkic semi-nomadic warrior tribe that became Slavicized in the 7th century AD
East Slavic languages
Russian
Belarusian
Ukrainian
Rusyn
Slavs in the US and Canada by area:
20–35%
14–20%
11–14%
8–11%
5–8%
3–5%
0–3%
The percentage of ethnic Russians in post-Soviet states according to last censuses
90.0%-100.0%
80.0%-89.9%
65.0%-79.9%
50.0%-64.9%
35.0%-49.9%
20.0%-34.9%
10.0%-19.9%
5.0%-9.9%
2.0%-4.9%
0.0%-1.9%

Present-day Slavs are classified into East Slavs (chiefly Belarusians, Russians, Rusyns, and Ukrainians), West Slavs (chiefly Czechs, Kashubs, Poles, Slovaks, Silesians and Sorbs) and South Slavs (chiefly Bosniaks, Bulgarians, Croats, Macedonians, Montenegrins, Serbs and Slovenes).

Second Bulgarian Empire

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Second Bulgarian Empire under Ivan Asen II
Second Bulgarian Empire under Ivan Asen II
The Church of St Demetrius in Tarnovo, built by Asen and Peter in the beginning of the uprising
Second Bulgarian Empire under Ivan Asen II
A map of the Bulgarian Empire, showing territorial extent and the campaigns between 1185 and 1197
The Church of the Holy Forty Martyrs where Kaloyan was buried.
A map showing the greatest territorial extension of the Second Bulgarian Empire during the reign of Ivan Asen II (1218–1241)
Emperor Constantine Tikh and his first wife Irene, fresco from the Boyana Church
Bulgaria under Theodore Svetoslav (1300-1322)
The fortress of Baba Vida in Vidin
Second Bulgarian Empire, 1331-71
The defeat of the anti-Ottoman coalition in the battle of Nicopolis in 1396 was the final blow leading to the fall of the Bulgarian Empire.
The Medieval Bulgarian royal charters, such as the Rila Charter of Ivan Shishman issued in 1378, are an important source on medieval Bulgarian society and administrative posts.
Panoramic view of Tarnovo, the capital of the Second Bulgarian Empire
Aerial view of the Shumen fortress, an important stronghold in eastern Bulgaria
A silver vessel from the 14th century Nikopol treasure
Economy of the Second Bulgarian Empire
Coin depicting Ivan Alexander with one of his sons, co-emperor Michael Asen IV (right)
The Patriarchal Cathedral of the Holy Ascension of God in Tarnovo was the seat of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church during the Second Empire. It was part of a larger complex which accommodated the Patriarch.
A depiction of emperor Ivan Alexander, patron of Hesychasm
The Church of the Holy Mother of God in Donja Kamenica
Culture of the Second Bulgarian Empire
The ruins of a noble family's house in Tarnovo
A depiction of Kaloyan and Desislava, ktitors of the Boyana Church
Frescos in the Rock-hewn Churches of Ivanovo
A page of the 14th century Tetraevangelia of Ivan Alexander
A page of the 14th century Bulgarian translation of the Manasses Chronicle
Pontic littoral's city and flags of Second Bulgarian Empire (Bulgarian rulers Shishman) on vexilographic maps by the end of the 13th – 17th centuries

The Second Bulgarian Empire (Middle Bulgarian: Ц(а)рьство бл(ъ)гарское; Modern Bulgarian: Второ българско царство, Vtorо Balgarskо Tsarstvo) was a medieval Bulgarian state that existed between 1185 and 1396.

Plovdiv

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Second-largest city in Bulgaria (after Sofia), standing on the banks of the Maritsa river in the historical region of Thrace.

Second-largest city in Bulgaria (after Sofia), standing on the banks of the Maritsa river in the historical region of Thrace.

Ancient settlements with names related to "deva". Pulpudeva denotes Plovdiv in which the latter name is rooted.
Map describing the city as "Philippopolis, que et Poneropolis, Duloupolis, Eumolpiada, item Trimontium, at que Pulpudena"
Plovdiv seen from space
A view of Nebet tepe hill
A view of Plovdiv with the Rhodope Mountains in the background.
Plan of the known parts of the Roman city superimposed on a plan of modern Plovdiv.
Monument of Krum in Plovdiv, who was the first Bulgarian ruler to capture Plovdiv.
The Virgin Mary Church.
Nebet Tepe, drawing from The Graphic – London, 1885
Taat tepe, in Plovdiv, with the governor's palace and Maritsa river in the foreground. Drawing from The Graphic – London, 1885
A preserved medieval street in the Old town
A performance in the Roman Odeon
The Art Gallery of Plovdiv
Plovdiv Central railway station.
Bus in Plovdiv
Trolleybus in Plovdiv
Map of Plovdiv's cycling infrastructure
Green: built
Orange: planned
Plovdiv Airport.
A view from the "singing fountains" in Tsar Simeon's garden.
A view from the City garden.
Hristo Stoichkov
Sign showing Plovdiv's sister cities
The Virgin Mary Eastern Orthodox Church
The Plovdiv Synagogue
A Protestant church
The St Louis Roman Catholic Cathedral
St George Armenian Church
The Dzhumaya Mosque
The Orthodox seminary
Theatre
Roman stadium
Odeon
Forum
The Bishop`s basilica of Phiippopolis
Bishop basilica
Small basilica
Small bacilica
3rd century round tower
Mosaics in Eirene residence
Aqueduct
Nebet tepe
Balabanov house
Lamartine House
Church of St Constantine and Helena
Klianti House
Old town
Street of Old town
Plovdiv Regional Ethnographic Museum
Old town
Old town - Plovdiv
Plovdiv Regional Historical Museum
Hindliyan House
Hisar gate with the ethnographical museum
Mall Plovdiv Plaza
Mall Markovo tepe
Mall Plovdiv
Forum Trakia shopping center
Velodrome
Plovdiv Stadium and sport complex
Rowing base
Lokomotiv Stadium
Hristo Botev Stadium
Plovdiv University sports hall
A panoramic view
Looking down one of the streets in Plovdiv.
Plan of the medieval fortress

The city was subsequently a local Thracian settlement, later being conquered and ruled also by Persians, Ancient Macedonians, Celts, Romans, Byzantines, Goths, Huns, Bulgarians (Thracians, Bulgars, Slavic tribes, etc.), Crusaders, and Ottoman Turks.

The Balkan states
 Political communities that are included in the Balkans 
 Political communities that are often included in the Balkans

Balkans

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Geographic area in southeastern Europe with various geographical and historical definitions.

Geographic area in southeastern Europe with various geographical and historical definitions.

The Balkan states
 Political communities that are included in the Balkans 
 Political communities that are often included in the Balkans
Western Balkan countries – Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, Montenegro, North Macedonia, and Serbia. Croatia (yellow) joined the EU in 2013.
Panorama of the Balkan Mountains (Stara Planina). Its highest peak is Botev at a height of 2,376 m.
Sutjeska National Park contains Perućica, which is the largest primeval forests in the Balkans, and one of the last remaining in Europe.
View toward Rila, the highest mountain of the Balkans and Southeast Europe (2,925 m).
Lake Skadar is the largest lake in the Balkans and Southern Europe.
The Jireček Line
Pula Arena, the only remaining Roman amphitheatre to have four side towers and with all three Roman architectural orders entirely preserved.
Remnants of the Felix Romuliana Imperial Palace, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Apollonia ruins near Fier, Albania.
The Balkans in 850 AD
Modern political history of the Balkans from 1796 onwards.
Hagia Sophia, built in sixth century Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey) as an Eastern Orthodox cathedral, later a mosque, then a museum, and now both a mosque and a museum
Tsarevets, a medieval stronghold in the former capital of the Bulgarian Empire – Veliko Tarnovo.
The 13th-century church of St. John at Kaneo and the Ohrid Lake in North Macedonia. The lake and town were declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1980.
State entities on the former territory of Yugoslavia, 2008
View from Santorini in Greece. Tourism is an important part of the Greek economy.
Dubrovnik in Croatia, a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1979.
View towards Sveti Stefan in Montenegro. Tourism makes up a significant part of the Montenegrin economy.
View towards Piran in Slovenia. Tourism is a rapidly growing sector of the Slovenian economy.
Golden Sands, a popular tourist destination on the Bulgarian coast.
Belgrade is a major industrial city and the capital of Serbia.
The Stari Most in Mostar, a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2005.
Map showing religious denominations
Approximate distribution of religions in Albania
Ethnic map of the Balkans (1880)
Transhumance ways of the Romance-speaking Vlach shepherds in the past

As examples, for Greeks, Constantine XI Palaiologos and Kolokotronis; and for Serbs, Miloš Obilić, Tsar Lazar and Karadjordje; for Albanians, George Kastrioti Skanderbeg; for ethnic Macedonians, Nikola Karev and Goce Delčev; for Bulgarians, Vasil Levski, Georgi Sava Rakovski and Hristo Botev and for Croats, Nikola Šubić Zrinjski.

Bulgars led by Khan Krum pursue the Byzantines at the Battle of Versinikia (813)

Bulgars

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The Bulgars (also Bulghars, Bulgari, Bolgars, Bolghars, Bolgari, Proto-Bulgarians ) were Turkic semi-nomadic warrior tribes that flourished in the Pontic–Caspian steppe and the Volga region during the 7th century.

The Bulgars (also Bulghars, Bulgari, Bolgars, Bolghars, Bolgari, Proto-Bulgarians ) were Turkic semi-nomadic warrior tribes that flourished in the Pontic–Caspian steppe and the Volga region during the 7th century.

Bulgars led by Khan Krum pursue the Byzantines at the Battle of Versinikia (813)
The migration of the Bulgars after the fall of Old Great Bulgaria in the 7th century.
Map of the Bulgar necropolises on the Lower Danube (8–9 century AD.)
The Madara Rider, an example of Bulgar art in Bulgaria, dated to the beginning of the 8th century
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Partial reconstruction of the Great Basilica in the first capital of the Bulgarian Empire, Pliska.
The reconstructed copy of Chatalar Inscription by Khan Omurtag (815-831). It is written in Greek, and top two lines read: "Kanasubigi Omortag, in the land where he was born is archon by God. In the field of Pliska...".
The jug golden medallion, from the Treasure of Nagyszentmiklós, depicts a warrior with his captive. Experts cannot agree if this warrior represents a Khazar, Pannonian Avar, or Bulgar.
Map of the monuments of Sivashovka type

They merged subsequently with established Byzantine populations, as well as with previously settled Slavic tribes, and were eventually Slavicized, thus forming the ancestors of modern Bulgarians.