Bulletin board system

BBSbulletin board systemsBBSesbulletin boardBBSsbulletin boardsbulletin board system (BBS)electronic bulletin boardBulletin Board Servicebulletin-board system
A Bulletin Board System or BBS (once called Computer Bulletin Board Service, CBBS ) is a computer server running software that allows users to connect to the system using a terminal program.wikipedia
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BBS door

door gamesBBS door gamedropfile
Many BBSes also offer online games in which users can compete with each other.
A door in a bulletin board system (BBS) is an interface between the BBS software and an external application.

PTT Bulletin Board System

Professional Technology TemplePtt
Today, BBSing survives largely as a nostalgic hobby in most parts of the world, but it is still an extremely popular form of communication for Taiwanese youth (see PTT Bulletin Board System).
PTT Bulletin Board System (PTT, telnet://ptt.cc) is the largest terminal-based bulletin board system (BBS) based in Taiwan.

Social networking service

social networkingSocial network servicesocial networking site
Bulletin board systems were in many ways a precursor to the modern form of the World Wide Web, social networks, and other aspects of the Internet.
Efforts to support social networks via computer-mediated communication were made in many early online services, including Usenet, ARPANET, LISTSERV, and bulletin board services (BBS).

Community Memory

Community Memory Project
A precursor to the public bulletin board system was Community Memory, started in August 1973 in Berkeley, California.
Community Memory (CM) was the first public computerized bulletin board system.

Internet Relay Chat

IRCIRC clientIRC channel
Most surviving BBSes are accessible over Telnet and typically offer free email accounts, FTP services, IRC and all the protocols commonly used on the Internet.
IRC was created by Jarkko Oikarinen in August 1988 to replace a program called MUT (MultiUser Talk) on a BBS called OuluBox at the University of Oulu in Finland, where he was working at the Department of Information Processing Science.

ANSI art

ANSIANSI graphicsANSI Art Scene
Most of the information was displayed using ordinary ASCII text or ANSI art, but a number of systems attempted character-based graphical user interfaces which began to be practical at 2400 bit/s.
ANSI art is a computer art form that was widely used at one time on BBSes.

Ward Christensen

The first public dial-up BBS was developed by Ward Christensen and Randy Suess.
Ward Christensen (born 1945 in West Bend, Wisconsin, United States) is the co-founder of the CBBS bulletin board, the first bulletin board system (BBS) ever brought online.

Pennywhistle modem

PennyWhistle
The poor quality of the original modem connecting the terminals to the mainframe prompted a user to invent the Pennywhistle modem, whose design was highly influential in the mid-1970s.
As part of the effort that would lead to the Community Memory bulletin board system, Lee Felsenstein had found an Omnitech modem ("or something like that").

Boardwatch

Boardwatch Magazine
Towards the early 1990s, the BBS industry became so popular that it spawned three monthly magazines, Boardwatch, BBS Magazine, and in Asia and Australia, Chips 'n Bits Magazine which devoted extensive coverage of the software and technology innovations and people behind them, and listings to US and worldwide BBSes.
Founded in 1987, it began as a publication for the online Bulletin Board Systems of the 1980s and 1990s and ultimately evolved into a trade magazine for the Internet service provider (ISP) industry in the late 1990s.

Bulletin board

bulletin boardsnotice boardcorkboard
Christensen patterned the system after the cork board his local computer club used to post information like "need a ride".
Bulletin boards can also be entirely in the digital domain and placed on computer networks so people can leave and erase messages for other people to read and see, as in a bulletin board system.

FirstClass

The latter initially appeared, unsurprisingly, on the Macintosh platform, where TeleFinder and FirstClass became very popular.
FirstClass is a client–server groupware, email, online conferencing, voice and fax services, and bulletin-board system for Windows, macOS, and Linux.

Event Horizons BBS

These systems charged for access, typically a flat monthly fee, compared to the per-hour fees charged by Event Horizons BBS and most online services.
Event Horizons BBS was a popular and perhaps the most financially successful Bulletin Board System (BBS).

The Bread Board System

TBBS
A complete Dynamic web page implementation was accomplished using TBBS with a TDBS add-on presenting a complete menu system individually customized for each user.
The Bread Board System (TBBS) is a multiline MS-DOS based commercial bulletin board system software package written in 1983 by Philip L. Becker.

ExecPC BBS

Some of the larger commercial BBSes, such as MaxMegabyte and ExecPC BBS, evolved into Internet Service Providers.
It quickly grew to be one of the world's largest bulletin board systems in the 1980s and throughout the 1990s, competing with the likes of Compuserve and Prodigy.

Jason Scott

Jason Scott Sadofsky
The owner of textfiles.com, Jason Scott, also produced BBS: The Documentary, a DVD film that chronicles the history of the BBS and features interviews with well-known people (mostly from the United States) from the heyday BBS era.
He is the creator, owner and maintainer of textfiles.com, a web site which archives files from historic bulletin board systems.

Textfiles.com

The website textfiles.com serves as an archive that documents the history of the BBS.
textfiles.com is a website dedicated to preserving the digital documents that contain the history of the bulletin board system (BBS) world and various subcultures, and thus providing "a glimpse into the history of writers and artists bound by the 128 characters that the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) allowed them".

Remote Imaging Protocol

RIPRIPscripRIPTerm
One example was the Remote Imaging Protocol, essentially a picture description system, which remained relatively obscure.
It was originally created by Jeff Reeder, Jim Bergman, and Mark Hayton of TeleGrafix Communications in Huntington Beach, California to enhance bulletin board systems and other applications.

Skypix

Skypix featured on Amiga a complete markup language.
Skypix is the name of a markup language used to encode graphics content such as changeable fonts, mouse-controlled actions, animations and sound to bulletin board system.

CompuServe

CompuServe Information ServiceTapCISOzWin
InfoWorld estimated that there were 60,000 BBSes serving 17 million users in the United States alone in 1994, a collective market much larger than major online services such as CompuServe.
NavCIS included features for offline work, similar to offline readers used with Bulletin board systems, allowing users to connect to the service and exchange new mail and forum content in a largely automated fashion.

BBS: The Documentary

BBS DocumentaryBBS:_The_Documentarydocumentary
The owner of textfiles.com, Jason Scott, also produced BBS: The Documentary, a DVD film that chronicles the history of the BBS and features interviews with well-known people (mostly from the United States) from the heyday BBS era.
BBS: The Documentary (commonly referred to as BBS Documentary) is a 3-disc, 8-episode documentary about the subculture born from the creation of the bulletin board system (BBS) filmed by computer historian Jason Scott of textfiles.com.

Command-line interface

command linecommand-linecommand line interface
Through the late 1980s and early 1990s, there was considerable experimentation with ways to improve the BBS experience from its command-line interface roots.
Some of these PCs were running Bulletin Board System software.

PCBoard

Clark Development CorporationPCBClark Development
Many successful commercial BBS programs were developed for DOS, such as PCBoard BBS, RemoteAccess BBS, and Wildcat! BBS.
PCBoard (PCB) was a bulletin board system (BBS) application first introduced for DOS in 1983 by Clark Development Company.

TeleFinder

The latter initially appeared, unsurprisingly, on the Macintosh platform, where TeleFinder and FirstClass became very popular.
TeleFinder is a Macintosh-based bulletin-board system written by Spider Island Software, based on a client–server model whose client end provides a Mac-like GUI.

List of BBS software

Opus-CBCSBBS SoftwareOpus
A Bulletin Board System or BBS (once called Computer Bulletin Board Service, CBBS ) is a computer server running software that allows users to connect to the system using a terminal program.

WWIV

WWIV BBS
Some popular freeware BBS programs for DOS included Telegard BBS and Renegade BBS, which both had early origins from leaked WWIV BBS source code.
WWIV was a popular brand of bulletin board system software from the late 1980s through the mid-1990s.