Bunjevci

BunjevacBunjevac peopleBunjevacaCroat (Bunjevci)
Bunjevci are a South Slavic ethnic group living mostly in the Bačka region of Serbia (province of Vojvodina) and southern Hungary (Bács-Kiskun county, particularly in the Baja region).wikipedia
213 Related Articles

Bunjevac dialect

BunjevacBunjevac languageBunjevac speech
Bunjevci are mainly Roman Catholic, and speak the Bunjevac dialect of Serbo-Croatian with Ikavian pronunciation and with certain archaic characteristics.
The Bunjevac dialect (bunjevački govor or bunjevački jezik, "Bunjevac language") is a Shtokavian–Western Ikavian dialect used by members of the Bunjevci community.

Bačka

BácskaBackaBatschka
Bunjevci are a South Slavic ethnic group living mostly in the Bačka region of Serbia (province of Vojvodina) and southern Hungary (Bács-Kiskun county, particularly in the Baja region).
According to the Austrian censuses from 1715–20, Serbs, Bunjevci, and Šokci comprised most of the region's population (97.6% of population according to 1715–1720 census data ).

Vojvodina

Autonomous Province of VojvodinaVoivodinaAP Vojvodina
Bunjevci are a South Slavic ethnic group living mostly in the Bačka region of Serbia (province of Vojvodina) and southern Hungary (Bács-Kiskun county, particularly in the Baja region).
On 25 November 1918, the Assembly of Serbs, Bunjevci, and other nations of Vojvodina in Novi Sad proclaimed the unification of Vojvodina (Banat, Bačka and Baranja) with the Kingdom of Serbia (The assembly numbered 757 deputies, of which 578 were Serbs, 84 Bunjevci, 62 Slovaks, 21 Rusyn, 6 Germans, 3 Šokci, 2 Croats and 1 Hungarian).

Serbia

SRBRepublic of SerbiaSerbian
Bunjevci are a South Slavic ethnic group living mostly in the Bačka region of Serbia (province of Vojvodina) and southern Hungary (Bács-Kiskun county, particularly in the Baja region).
Roman Catholics number 356,957 in Serbia, or roughly 6% of the population, mostly in Vojvodina (especially its northern part) which is home to minority ethnic groups such as Hungarians, Croats, Bunjevci, as well as to some Slovaks and Czechs.

South Slavs

South SlavicSouth SlavSlavic
Bunjevci are a South Slavic ethnic group living mostly in the Bačka region of Serbia (province of Vojvodina) and southern Hungary (Bács-Kiskun county, particularly in the Baja region).
The Catholic Bunjevci and Šokci concentrated in northern Serbia and eastern Croatia are divided between a Croat or own identity.

Šokci

ŠokacŠokadijaSokci
According to Petar Skok they also called themselves in Bačka as oò*kac (Šokac), while Hungarians in Szeged also called them as Dalmát (Dalmatians; Dalmatini), which they also used for themselves in Hungary. Croat national identity was adopted by some Bunjevci in the late 19th and early 20th century, especially by the majority of the Bunjevac clergy, notably one of the titular bishops of Kalocsa, Ivan Antunović (1815–1888), supported the notion of calling Bunjevci and Šokci with the name Croats.
According to the Austrian census in Bačka from 1715, Serbs, Bunjevci, and Šokci comprised 97.6% of population.

Ivan Antunović

Croat national identity was adopted by some Bunjevci in the late 19th and early 20th century, especially by the majority of the Bunjevac clergy, notably one of the titular bishops of Kalocsa, Ivan Antunović (1815–1888), supported the notion of calling Bunjevci and Šokci with the name Croats.
Ivan Antunović (Antunovich János; June 19, 1815 – January 3, 1888 ) was a Bunjevac writer, one of the most prominent public persons among the Bunjevci and Šokci people of his time.

Modrić (surname)

ModrichModrići
In 1712/1714 census of Lika and Krbava was recorded only one Bunieuacz (Vid Modrich), however the military government usually used alternative term Valachi Catolici, while Luigi Ferdinando Marsili called them Meerkroaten (Littoral Croats).
According to another consideration, they or some of the surname holders were of Bunjevci origin from Dalmatia and Western Herzegovina.

Krmpote

Krmpoćani
In the 20th century hinterland of Novi Vinodolski, called as Krmpote, the Primorje (Littoral or Coastal) Bunjevci were economically less powerful rural population and hence it had an attribution of "otherness" with negative connotation by urban citizens.
It is related to local population of Bunjevci and etymologically deriving from their tribe named Krmpoćani (Carimpoti; Krnpote and Krmpote) who arrived from temporary village area of Krmpota (Carampotti) near Zemunik (today between Medviđe and Zelengrad), in North Dalmatia (Bukovica) in the beginning of the 17th century.

Croats

CroatianCroatCroatians
Bunjevci who remained in Bosnia and Herzegovina, as well as those in modern Croatia today maintain that designation chiefly as a regional identity, and declare as ethnic Croats.
The minority in Serbia number about 70,000, mostly in Vojvodina, where also vast majority of the Šokci consider themselves Croats, as well as many Bunjevci (the latter, as well as other nationalities, settled the vast, abandoned area after the Ottoman retreat; this Croat subgroup originates from the south, mostly from the region of Bačka).

Serbo-Croatian

Serbo-Croatian languageSerbo-CroatSerbo-Croato-Slovenian
Bunjevci are mainly Roman Catholic, and speak the Bunjevac dialect of Serbo-Croatian with Ikavian pronunciation and with certain archaic characteristics.

Smiljan

Some also arrived during the Cretan War (1645–1669), and after the Ottomans defeat in Lika (1683–1687), some littoral Bunjevci moved to settlements in Lika, like Pazarište, Smiljan, Gospićko field, Široka Kula, valley of Ričice and Hotuče.
After the defeat of the Ottomans in Lika, most of the Bunjevci (Roman Catholic Vlachs who spoke Western Herzegovinian subdialect of Neo-Shtokavian with Ikavian accent) migrated to Lika, including Smiljan between 1683–87.

Novi Sad

Novi Sad, SerbiaÚjvidékCity of Novi Sad
This was confirmed at the Great National Assembly of Serbs, Bunjevci and other Slavs in Novi Sad, which proclaimed unification with the Kingdom of Serbia in November 1918.
It is not certain whether Hungarians or Serbs were the larger ethnic group in the city in 1910, since the various ethnic groups (Bunjevci, Romani, Jews, other South Slavic people, etc.) were classified in census results only according to the language they spoke.

Lika

Lika regionEastern LikaLika plains
They presumably originate from western Herzegovina, whence they migrated to Dalmatia, and from there to Lika and Bačka in the 17th century.

Banat, Bačka and Baranja

Torontalsko-tamiškesecessionProvince of Banat, Bačka and Baranja
This was confirmed at the Great National Assembly of Serbs, Bunjevci and other Slavs in Novi Sad, which proclaimed unification with the Kingdom of Serbia in November 1918. In October 1918, Bunjevci held a national convention in Subotica and decided to secede Banat, Bačka and Baranja from the Kingdom of Hungary and to join Kingdom of Serbia.
The assembly numbered 757 deputies, of whom 578 were Serbs, 84 Bunjevci, 62 Slovaks, 21 Rusyns, 6 Germans, 3 Šokci, 2 Croats, and 1 Hungarian.

Croats of Serbia

CroatsCroatCroats of Vojvodina
The community, however, has been divided around the issue of the ethnic affiliation: in the 2011 census, in terms of ethnicity, 16,706 inhabitants of Vojvodina self-declared as Bunjevci and 47,033 as Croats.
During the 17th century, Roman Catholic Bunjevci from Dalmatia migrated to Vojvodina, where Šokci had already been living.

Donji Tavankut

Subotica

SzabadkaMaria-TheresiopelSubotica, Yugoslavia
The largest concentration of Bunjevci in Serbia (9,235) is in the ethnically mixed city of Subotica, which is their cultural and political center.
In 1687, the region was settled by Catholic Dalmatas (called Bunjevci today).

Jovan Erdeljanović

J. ErdeljanovićErdeljanović, J.
The third was argued by Serbian academic elite, including Aleksa Ivić, Radivoj Simonović, Jovan Erdeljanović among others, but without proper argumentation and ethnological basis, which also included unsubstantiated claims like that they got Ikavian pronunciation because of Franciscan friars influence.

Zvonko Bogdan

Zvonimir "Zvonko" Bogdan (born January 5, 1942) is a Serbian performer of traditional folk songs of Serbia, Croatia, Hungary and Romania, best known for singing about the Bunjevci.

Bácsalmás

Almasch
With the arrival of the Turks, the population disappeared and was at first replaced by Croats (Bunjevci) who came from Bosnia and the Croatian Littoral.

Gaja Alaga

He was born in noble family of Bunjevac Croats in the village of Lemeš (today called Svetozar Miletić) in northwestern Bačka in Kingdom of SHS (today in autonomous province Vojvodina, Serbia).