Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs

BNDDBureau of Narcotics
The Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (BNDD) was a bureau within the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) and a predecessor agency of the modern Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).wikipedia
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Drug Enforcement Administration

DEAUnited States Drug Enforcement AdministrationU.S. Drug Enforcement Administration
The Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (BNDD) was a bureau within the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) and a predecessor agency of the modern Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).
As a result, the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (BNDD), the Office of Drug Abuse Law Enforcement (ODALE); approximately 600 Special Agents of the Bureau of Customs, Customs Agency Service, and other federal offices merged to create the DEA.

Bureau of Drug Abuse Control

It was formed as a subsidiary of the United States Department of Justice, combining the Bureau of Narcotics (from the United States Department of the Treasury) and Bureau of Drug Abuse Control (from the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare's Food and Drug Administration) into one agency.
The Bureau of Drug Abuse Control was formed as a part of the United States Food and Drug Administration in February 1966 and existed until 1968 when it was merged with the Federal Bureau of Narcotics to form the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs.

Federal Bureau of Narcotics

Bureau of NarcoticsFederal Narcotics BureauFBN
It was formed as a subsidiary of the United States Department of Justice, combining the Bureau of Narcotics (from the United States Department of the Treasury) and Bureau of Drug Abuse Control (from the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare's Food and Drug Administration) into one agency.
Anslinger retired in 1962 and was succeeded by Henry Giordano, who was the commissioner of the FBN until it was merged in 1968 with the Bureau of Drug Abuse Control, an agency of the Food and Drug Administration, to form the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, an agency of the United States Department of Justice.

United States v. Russell

In late 1969, Joe Shapiro, an agent for the federal Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (later to become part of the Drug Enforcement Administration), was assigned to locate an illegal methamphetamine ("meth") production lab believed to be on Whidbey Island in Washington.

United States Department of Justice

Department of JusticeU.S. Department of JusticeJustice Department
The Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (BNDD) was a bureau within the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) and a predecessor agency of the modern Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). It was formed as a subsidiary of the United States Department of Justice, combining the Bureau of Narcotics (from the United States Department of the Treasury) and Bureau of Drug Abuse Control (from the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare's Food and Drug Administration) into one agency.

United States Department of the Treasury

Treasury DepartmentU.S. Treasury DepartmentU.S. Treasury
It was formed as a subsidiary of the United States Department of Justice, combining the Bureau of Narcotics (from the United States Department of the Treasury) and Bureau of Drug Abuse Control (from the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare's Food and Drug Administration) into one agency.

United States Department of Health and Human Services

Department of Health and Human ServicesU.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesHealth and Human Services
It was formed as a subsidiary of the United States Department of Justice, combining the Bureau of Narcotics (from the United States Department of the Treasury) and Bureau of Drug Abuse Control (from the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare's Food and Drug Administration) into one agency.

Food and Drug Administration

FDAU.S. Food and Drug AdministrationUnited States Food and Drug Administration
It was formed as a subsidiary of the United States Department of Justice, combining the Bureau of Narcotics (from the United States Department of the Treasury) and Bureau of Drug Abuse Control (from the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare's Food and Drug Administration) into one agency.

Richard Helms

Richard McGarrah HelmsDick HelmsHelms, Richard
In January 1971 the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) director, Richard Helms, approved a program of "covert recruitment and security clearance support to BNDD", on request of the BNDD director, John Ingersoll.

Police corruption

corruptioncorruptdirty cop
Ingersoll suspected widespread corruption among BNDD agents, and in December 1970 requested the CIA's assistance in rooting it out.

Central Intelligence Agency

CIAC.I.A.Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
In January 1971 the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) director, Richard Helms, approved a program of "covert recruitment and security clearance support to BNDD", on request of the BNDD director, John Ingersoll. What was also suspected and has been confirmed is the CIA was actually running covert operations via BNDD.

Covert operation

covert operationscovertcovert action
What was also suspected and has been confirmed is the CIA was actually running covert operations via BNDD.

Controlled Substances Act

Schedule ISchedule IISchedule III
With the help of White House Counsel head, John Dean; the Executive Director of the Shafer Commission, Michael Sonnenreich; and the Director of the BNDD, John Ingersoll creating and writing the legislation, Mitchell was able to present Nixon with the bill.

Project MINARET

MINARETUSSID 18
Intercepted messages were disseminated to the FBI, CIA, Secret Service, Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (BNDD), and the Department of Defense.

War on drugs

drug interdictioncounter-narcoticsdrug war
In 1973, the Drug Enforcement Administration was created to replace the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs.

Medical cannabis in the United States

medical marijuanamedical cannabismedical use of cannabis
The classification of cannabis as a Schedule I drug was first challenged by the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) in a 1972 petition to the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (which was merged with other agencies to form the DEA in 1973).

Diversion Investigator

The DI position was originally known as a "Compliance Investigator" and was created to address the regulatory responsibilities of the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (BNDD) following the enactment of the CSA in 1970.

Stony Man

Stony Man Mountain
Kissinger first worked for the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the predecessor to the DEA.

Michael Sonnenreich

Michael R. Sonnenreich
Then, Sonnenreich had transferred to the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (BNDD: division of the Department of Justice) as Deputy Chief Counsel from 1969-1971, and was later appointed by President Nixon to be the Executive Director of the National Commission on Marijuana and Drug Abuse / Shafer Commission from 1971-1973.

Elvis & Nixon

Elvis and Nixon
Presley opposes the drug culture, the hippie movement, SDS, and the Black Panther Party; he wants Nixon to swear him in as an undercover agent in the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs.

The Anderson Tapes

film
These include a private detective hired to eavesdrop on Anderson's girlfriend who is also the mistress of a wealthy man; the BNDD (a precursor to the DEA), who are checking over a released drug dealer; the FBI, investigating Black activists and the interstate smuggling of antiques; and the IRS, which is after the mob boss who is financing the operation.