A report on Burgenland

Unterwart Landscape ( East Styrian Hills )
Districts of Burgenland
The Ostrogothic Kingdom in Pannonia
Habsburg mortgages in Burgenland between the 15th and 17th centuries
The Kingdom of Hungary as divided into 3 parts
Protocoll of Venice from Oct.13.1921
A memorial in Krensdorf to soldiers who died in the two World Wars
Burgenland under Soviet administration, 1945-1955
Burgenland is part of Centrope, a project establishing a multinational region in four Central European states: Slovakia, Austria, Hungary and the Czech Republic.

Easternmost and least populous state of Austria.

- Burgenland

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Overall

Styria

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State (Bundesland) in the southeast of Austria.

State (Bundesland) in the southeast of Austria.

Grüner See with the Hochschwab mountain in the background
Graz, the capital of Styria
Historical view of the border between Styria and Carinthia, 1830
View over the vineyards of Western Styria
StyriaLänd Bezirke
An enshrined crucifix amidst cornfields near Mureck in rural Styria, attesting to enduring Catholic faith and popular piety ("Volksfrömmigkeit")

Styria is bordered to the south by Slovenia, and clockwise, from the southwest, by the Austrian states of Carinthia, Salzburg, Upper Austria, Lower Austria, and Burgenland.

Austria

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Landlocked country in the southern part of Central Europe, situated at Eastern Alps.

Landlocked country in the southern part of Central Europe, situated at Eastern Alps.

Venus of Willendorf, 28,000 to 25,000 BC, at the Museum of Natural History Vienna
The Battle of Vienna in 1683 broke the advance of the Ottoman Empire into Europe.
The Congress of Vienna met in 1814–15. The objective of the Congress was to settle the many issues arising from the French Revolutionary Wars, the Napoleonic Wars, and the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire.
Map of the German Confederation (1815–1836) with its 39 member states
An ethno-linguistic map of Austria-Hungary, 1910
Archduke Franz Ferdinand, whose assassination sparked World War I, one of the most disastrous conflicts in human history
German-speaking provinces claimed by German-Austria in 1918: The border of the subsequent Second Republic of Austria is outlined in red.
Adolf Hitler speaking at Heldenplatz, Vienna, 1938
Austria in 1941 when it was known as the "Ostmark"
The liberation of Mauthausen concentration camp, 1945
The United Nations Office in Vienna is one of the four major UN office sites worldwide.
Austria joined the European Union in 1995 and signed the Lisbon Treaty in 2007.
The Austrian Parliament Building in Vienna
The Leopoldine Wing of Hofburg Imperial Palace in Vienna, home to the offices of the Austrian president
The Federal Chancellery on Ballhausplatz
The European Parliament: Austria is one of the 27 EU members.
A topographic map of Austria showing cities with over 100,000 inhabitants
Köppen-Geiger climate classification map for Austria
A proportional representation of Austria exports, 2019
Austria is part of a monetary union, the eurozone (dark blue), and of the EU single market.
The Kölnbrein Dam in Carinthia
Children in Austria, near Au, Vorarlberg
Bilingual sign of Oberwart (in Hungarian Felsőőr) in Burgenland
The birthplaces of foreign-born naturalised residents of Austria
The Basilica of Mariazell is Austria's most popular pilgrimage site.
Stiftsgymnasium Melk is the oldest Austrian school.
The University of Vienna
The campus of the Vienna University of Economics and Business
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756–1791)
The Vienna State Opera
Arnold Schwarzenegger is a well-known Austrian and American actor.
Karl Popper
Wiener Schnitzel, a traditional Austrian dish
Innsbruck hosted the 1964 and 1976 Winter Olympics, as well as the 2012 Winter Youth Olympics, the first in history.
Ski racer Franz Klammer won a gold medal at the 1976 Winter Olympics in Innsbruck.
The campus of JKU University of Linz

The Austrian federal states of Carinthia and Styria are home to a significant indigenous Slovene-speaking minority while in the easternmost state, Burgenland (formerly part of the Hungarian portion of Austria-Hungary), there are significant Hungarian- and Croatian-speaking minorities.

Eisenstadt

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Kleinhöflein im Burgenland at the foot of the Leitha Mountains
Calvary
The Old Town Hall
Paul I in 1655
Joseph Weigl in 1829
Joseph Haydn in 1791
Robert Musil around 1900

Eisenstadt (Kismarton; Željezni grad; Željezno; Železno, Austro-Bavarian: Eisnstod) is a city in Austria, the state capital of Burgenland.

Oberwart

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Roman Catholic Parish Church in Oberwart

Oberwart (Felsőőr; Gornja Borta) is a town in Burgenland in southeast Austria on the banks of the Pinka River, and the capital of the district of the same name.

Voitsberg District district border sign

Districts of Austria

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Second-level division of the executive arm of the Austrian government.

Second-level division of the executive arm of the Austrian government.

Voitsberg District district border sign

In Burgenland, Carinthia, Salzburg, Styria, Upper Austria, and Tyrol, the term used is political district (politischer Bezirk).

Kobersdorf Synagoge

Siebengemeinden

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The Siebengemeinden (שֶבַע קְהִלּוֹת; Seven Communities, Hét hitközség ) were seven Jewish communities located in Eisenstadt and its surrounding area.

The Siebengemeinden (שֶבַע קְהִלּוֹת; Seven Communities, Hét hitközség ) were seven Jewish communities located in Eisenstadt and its surrounding area.

Kobersdorf Synagoge

The Siebengemeinden (now in Austrian Burgenland, which formerly belonged to Hungary) were composed of communities in Eisenstadt, Mattersdorf (now Mattersburg), Kobersdorf, Lackenbach, Frauenkirchen, Kittsee, and Deutschkreutz (Tzeilem).

Neusiedl am See District

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Bezirk Neusiedl am See (Nezsideri járás; Kotar Niuzal) is a district of the state of Burgenland in Austria.

Oberpullendorf District

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Bezirk Oberpullendorf (Kotar Gornja Pulja) is a district of the state of Burgenland in Austria.

Austria-Hungary

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Constitutional monarchy and great power in Central Europe between 1867 and 1918.

Constitutional monarchy and great power in Central Europe between 1867 and 1918.

Silver coin: 5 corona, 1908 - The bust of Franz Joseph I facing right surrounded by the legend "Franciscus Iosephus I, Dei gratia, imperator Austriae, rex Bohemiae, Galiciae, Illyriae et cetera et apostolicus rex Hungariae"
Emperor Franz Joseph I in 1905
Electoral districts of Austria and Hungary in the 1880s. On the map opposition districts are marked in different shades of red, ruling party districts are in different shades of green, independent districts are in white.
Austrian Parliament building
Hungarian Parliament building
Emperor Franz Joseph I visiting Prague and opening the new Emperor Francis I Bridge in 1901
Kraków, a historical Polish city in the Austro-Hungarian Empire where in 1870 authorities allowed the use of the Polish language in the Jagiellonian University
Coronation of Francis Joseph I and Elisabeth Amalie at Matthias Church, Buda, 8 June 1867
Map of the counties of the Lands of the Crown of St. Stephen (Hungary proper and Croatia-Slavonia)
Circuits (Kreise) of Bosnia and Herzegovina: Banja Luka, Bihać, Mostar, Sarajevo, Travnik, Tuzla
Demonstration for universal right to vote in Prague, Bohemia, 1905
Bosnian Muslim resistance during the battle of Sarajevo in 1878 against the Austro-Hungarian occupation
Recruits from Bosnia-Herzegovina, including Muslim Bosniaks (31%), were drafted into special units of the Austro-Hungarian Army as early as 1879 and were commended for their bravery in service of the Austrian emperor, being awarded more medals than any other unit. The jaunty military march Die Bosniaken Kommen was composed in their honor by Eduard Wagnes.
Traditional clothing in Hungary, late 19th century
Traditional costumes of Tyrol
Parade in Prague, Kingdom of Bohemia, 1900
Romantic style Great Synagogue in Pécs, built by Neolog community in 1869
Religions in Austria–Hungary, from the 1881 edition of Andrees Allgemeiner Handatlas. Catholics (both Roman and Uniate) are blue, Protestants purple, Eastern Orthodox yellow, and Muslims green.
Funeral in Galicia by Teodor Axentowicz, 1882
Ethno-linguistic map of Austria–Hungary, 1910
Meyers Konversations-Lexikon ethnographic map of Austria–Hungary, 1885
Literacy in Austria–Hungary (census 1880)
Literacy in Hungary by counties in 1910 (excluding Croatia)
Physical map of Austria–Hungary in 1914
Orthodox Jews from Galicia in Leopoldstadt, Vienna, 1915
A 20-crown banknote of the Dual Monarchy, using all official and recognized languages (the reverse side was Hungarian)
Black Friday, 9 May 1873, Vienna Stock Exchange. The Panic of 1873 and Long Depression followed.
A stentor reading the day's news in the Telefonhírmondó of Budapest
Detailed railway map of Austrian and Hungarian railways from 1911
The start of construction of the underground in Budapest (1894–1896)
The SS Kaiser Franz Joseph I (12,567 t) of the Austro-Americana company was the largest passenger ship ever built in Austria. Because of its control over the coast of much of the Balkans, Austria–Hungary had access to several seaports.
Dubrovnik, Kingdom of Dalmatia
This picture of the arrest of a suspect in Sarajevo is usually associated with the capture of Gavrilo Princip, although some believe it depicts Ferdinand Behr, a bystander.
Crowds on the streets in the aftermath of the Anti-Serb riots in Sarajevo, 29 June 1914
MÁVAG armoured train in 1914
Franz Josef I and Wilhelm II
with military commanders during World War I
Siege of Przemyśl in 1915
Italian troops in Trento on 3 November 1918, after the Battle of Vittorio Veneto. Italy's victory marked the end of the war on the Italian Front and secured the dissolution of Austria–Hungary.
War memorial in Păuleni-Ciuc, Romania
The revolt of ethnic Czech units in Austria in May 1918 was brutally suppressed. It was considered a mutiny by the code of military justice.
The Treaty of Trianon: Kingdom of Hungary lost 72% of its land and 3.3 million people of Hungarian ethnicity.
Czechoslovak declaration of independence rally in Prague on Wenceslas Square, 28 October 1918

Austria (except Burgenland)

Győr-Moson-Sopron County

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District of Győr-Moson-Sopron County
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Győr, the capital of the county
Fire tower in Sopron
Eszterháza, the Hungarian Versailles
Kisalföld
Pannonhalma Archabbey
Széchenyi Mansion in Nagycenk
Gyülevizy-Pejacsevich Mansion in Zsira
Khuen-Héderváry Mansion in Hédervár

Győr-Moson-Sopron (Győr-Moson-Sopron megye, ; Komitat Raab-Wieselburg-Ödenburg; Rábsko-mošonsko-šopronská župa) is an administrative county (comitatus or megye) in north-western Hungary, on the border with Slovakia (Bratislava Region, Nitra Region and Trnava Region) and Austria (Burgenland).