Burgher (Boer republics)

burghersburgher
In the South African Boer republics of the 19th century, a burgher was a fully enfranchised citizen.wikipedia
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Orange Free State

Free StateOrange Free State RepublicRepublic of the Orange Free State
In the Orange Free State (1854–1902), the constitution restricted burgher rights to white male residents only, though coloured people (those of mixed ancestry) did have some rights regarding property.
All persons of European blood possessing a six months' residential qualification were to be granted full burgher rights.

Paul Kruger

KrugerPresident KrugerPresident Paul Kruger
The uitlanders demanded full burgher rights in the Transvaal, but the local government under President Paul Kruger was unwilling to grant these, surmising that the sheer number of uitlanders might imperil the republic's independence.
Following the influx of thousands of predominantly British settlers with the Witwatersrand Gold Rush of 1886, "uitlanders" (out-landers) provided almost all of the South African Republic's tax revenues but lacked civic representation; Boer burghers retained control of the government.

South African Republic

TransvaalTransvaal RepublicZuid-Afrikaansche Republiek
The South African Republic, or Transvaal (1852–1902), gave burgher rights to white males only and explicitly barred their extension to "persons of colour".
On 9 May 1887, burghers from the territories of Stellaland and Goosen (sometimes referred to as "Goshen") were granted rights to the ZAR franchise.

Uitlander

uitlanders
The Boers referred to these people as uitlanders (out-landers).
The vast Witwatersrand gold fields were discovered in 1886, and within ten years the uitlander population of the Transvaal was thought to be double that of the native Transvaalers, 60,000 uitlanders to 30,000 burghers.

Transvaal Colony

TransvaalWestern TransvaalColony of Transvaal
Following the British victory in the latter and the Treaty of Vereeniging, the Free State and the Transvaal were annexed by Britain as the Orange River Colony and Transvaal Colony.
1) That all burghers of the ZAR and Orange Free State lay down their arms and accept King Edward VII as their sovereign.

Boer Republics

Boer RepublicrepublicBoer
In the South African Boer republics of the 19th century, a burgher was a fully enfranchised citizen.
Burgher (Boer republics)

Orange River Colony

Orange Rivera British colonycolony
Following the British victory in the latter and the Treaty of Vereeniging, the Free State and the Transvaal were annexed by Britain as the Orange River Colony and Transvaal Colony.
A second political party, the Constitutional Party was formed by a group of burghers content with British rule.

Suffrage

right to votevoting rightsfranchise
In the South African Boer republics of the 19th century, a burgher was a fully enfranchised citizen.

Coloureds

colouredColoured peopleColoured person
In the Orange Free State (1854–1902), the constitution restricted burgher rights to white male residents only, though coloured people (those of mixed ancestry) did have some rights regarding property.

Boer Commando

commandoscommandoBoer
Burghers were "citizen-soldiers" who, between the ages of 16 and 60, were obliged to serve without pay in the republic's commandos, providing their own horse and rifle, 30 rounds of ammunition and their own rations for the first ten days.

Boer

Jameson Raid

Dr. Jameson's RaidAftermathfailed raid
The uitlander problem and the associated tensions between the South African Republic and Britain led to the Jameson Raid of 1895–96 and ultimately the Second Boer War of 1899–1902.

Second Boer War

Boer WarAnglo-Boer WarSouth African War
The uitlander problem and the associated tensions between the South African Republic and Britain led to the Jameson Raid of 1895–96 and ultimately the Second Boer War of 1899–1902.

Treaty of Vereeniging

VereenigingTreaty of the Peace of Vereenigingconclusion of peace
Following the British victory in the latter and the Treaty of Vereeniging, the Free State and the Transvaal were annexed by Britain as the Orange River Colony and Transvaal Colony.

History of South Africa

South AfricaSouth African historyBritish rule in South Africa
History of South Africa

Stella Court Treatt

She was the daughter of Alice Maud Jennings and Thomas Charles Hinds, a burgher of the Zuid-Afrikaansche Republiek with a farm near Magaliesburg.

Afrikaners

AfrikanerAfrikaansAfrikaner people
Historically, the terms "burgher" and "Boer" have both been used to describe white Afrikaans speakers as a group; neither is particularly objectionable but Afrikaner has been considered a more appropriate term.

National Convention (South Africa)

National ConventionSouth African National Conventioncreation
The first attempt to establish a union of the colonies of Southern Africa was in 1858, when burghers of the Orange Free State sent a petition to Sir George Grey, the then Governor of the Cape Colony, requesting the formation of a "compact union" including the Free State, the Cape, and Natal (but excluding the Transvaal).

Burgher

burghers
Burgher (Boer republics), an enfranchised citizen of the South African Republic or the Orange Free State

Battle of Naauwpoort

Earlier in the morning of 29 September while it was still dark, Basotho warriors charged on the unsuspecting group, killing five Trekboers (or burghers) while the unhobbled horses escaped.

Battle of Bergendal

BergendalBelfastbattle of Belfast
These burghers' task was to prevent the English from taking the back road to Dullstroom.

Volksraad

The legislature consisted of a "Second Volksraad", with suffrage for all white males above 16 years, which had limited legislative powers in the fields of mining, road construction, copyright and certain commercial affairs, all subject to ratification by the "First Volksraad". This was the highest authority in charge of state policy, with preference being given to fully franchised burghers for appointment to government posts.

William Wilberforce Bird (MP)

William Wilberforce Birdhis fatherWilberforce Bird
Covering in detail the system of government at the Cape, the law courts, the burgher senate, registration of slaves, agriculture, trade and the customs of the population, he was highly critical of the way in which such ceremonies as weddings and funerals were conducted.