Burgundians

BurgundianBurgundyBurgundBurgundsBourguignonBurgondian villageBurgundiBurgundian languageGermanicJurane Burgundy
The Burgundians (Burgundiōnes, Burgundī; ; Burgendas; ) were a large East Germanic (possibly Vandal) tribe or group of tribes that lived in the area of what is now Poland in the time of the Roman Empire.wikipedia
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Kingdom of the Burgundians

BurgundyBurgundiansBurgundian
They established themselves in Worms, but with Roman cooperation their descendants eventually established the Kingdom of the Burgundians much further south, and within the empire, in the western Alps region where modern Switzerland, France and Italy meet. The original Kingdom of the Burgundians barely intersected the modern Bourgogne and more closely matched the boundaries of the Arpitan or Romand (Franco-Provençal) language area, centred on the Rôno-Arpes (Rhône-Alpes) region of France, Romandy in west Switzerland and Val d'Outa (Val d'Aosta), in north west Italy.
The Kingdom of the Burgundians or First Kingdom of Burgundy was established by Germanic Burgundians in the Rhineland and then in Savoy in the 5th century.

Francia

FrankishFrankish EmpireFrankish Kingdom
This later became a component of the Frankish empire.
Once Clovis defeated his Roman competitor for power in northern Gaul, Syagrius, he turned to the kings of the Franks to the north and east, as well as other post-Roman kingdoms already existing in Gaul: Visigoths, Burgundians, and Alemanni.

Franco-Provençal language

Franco-ProvençalArpitanProvençal
The original Kingdom of the Burgundians barely intersected the modern Bourgogne and more closely matched the boundaries of the Arpitan or Romand (Franco-Provençal) language area, centred on the Rôno-Arpes (Rhône-Alpes) region of France, Romandy in west Switzerland and Val d'Outa (Val d'Aosta), in north west Italy.
By the 5th century, the region was controlled by the Burgundians.

Burgundy

BurgundianBourgogneBurgundy, France
The name of this kingdom survives in the regional appellation, Burgundy, which is a region in modern France, representing only a part of that kingdom. In modern times the only area still referred to as Burgundy is in France, which derives its name from the Duchy of Burgundy.
It takes its name from the Burgundians, an East Germanic people who moved westwards beyond the Rhine during the late Roman period.

History of the Huns

HunnicHunsinvasion of the Huns
Another part of the Burgundians stayed in their previous homeland in the Oder-Vistula basin and formed a contingent in Attila's Hunnic army by 451.
Other scholars have regarded both names as referring to a Germanic tribe, the Burgundi (Burgundians), although this identification was rejected by Maenchen-Helfen (who speculated that one or both names may have approximated an early Turkic ethnonym, such as "Vurugundi").

Bornholm

Bornholm islandBornholm Regional MunicipalityBornholm
Before clear documentary evidence begins, the Burgundians may have originally emigrated from mainland Scandinavia to the Baltic island of Bornholm, and from there to the Vistula basin, in the middle of what is now Poland.
Some scholars believe that the Burgundians are named after Bornholm; the Burgundians were Germanic peoples who moved west when the Western Roman Empire collapsed and occupied and named Burgundy in France.

Duchy of Burgundy

BurgundyBurgundianBurgundians
In modern times the only area still referred to as Burgundy is in France, which derives its name from the Duchy of Burgundy.
The Duchy of Burgundy was a successor of the earlier Kingdom of the Burgundians, which evolved out of territories ruled by the Burgundians, an East Germanic tribe that arrived in Gaul in the 5th century.

Sapaudia

sabaudiaeSavoy proper
The ethnonym Burgundians is commonly used in English to refer to the Burgundi (Burgundionei, Burgundiones or Burgunds) who settled in Sapaudia (Savoy), in the western Alps, during the 5th century.
During the 5th century, the Burgundians settled in the area, forming the Kingdom of the Burgundians, the capital of which was Lugdunum Segusianorum (Lyon).

Goths

GothicgothDeewan Lal Chand
Pliny (IV.28) however mentions them among the Vandalic or Eastern Germanic Germani peoples, including also the Goths.
As a result, in episodes of Gothic and Vandal warfare Germanic tribes (Rugii, Goths, Gepids, Vandals, Burgundians, and others) crossed either the lower Danube or the Black Sea, and led to the Marcomannic Wars, which resulted in widespread destruction and the first invasion of what is now Italy in the Roman Empire period.

Gepids

GepidGepid KingdomGepidae
Around the mid 2nd century AD, there was a significant migration by Germanic tribes of Scandinavian origin (Rugii, Goths, Gepidae, Vandals, Burgundians, and others) towards the south-east, creating turmoil along the entire Roman frontier.
They moved to the south and defeated the Burgundians.

Vandals

VandalVandalicVandal Kingdom
Pliny (IV.28) however mentions them among the Vandalic or Eastern Germanic Germani peoples, including also the Goths. The Burgundians (Burgundiōnes, Burgundī; ; Burgendas; ) were a large East Germanic (possibly Vandal) tribe or group of tribes that lived in the area of what is now Poland in the time of the Roman Empire. The dominant groups were Alans, Vandals (Hasdingi and Silingi), and Danubian Suevi (probably descended from Marcomanni and Quadi).
Tribes within this category who he mentions are the Burgundiones, Varini, Carini (otherwise unknown), and the Gutones.

Romandy

RomandieFrench-speaking SwitzerlandFrench-speaking
The original Kingdom of the Burgundians barely intersected the modern Bourgogne and more closely matched the boundaries of the Arpitan or Romand (Franco-Provençal) language area, centred on the Rôno-Arpes (Rhône-Alpes) region of France, Romandy in west Switzerland and Val d'Outa (Val d'Aosta), in north west Italy.
Historically, the linguistic boundary in the Swiss Plateau would have more or less followed the Aare during the early medieval period, separating Burgundy (where the Burgundians did not impose their Germanic language on the Gallo-Roman population) from Alemannia; in the High Middle Ages, the boundary gradually shifted westward and now more or less corresponds to the western boundary of the Zähringer possessions, which fell under Bernese rule in the late medieval period, and does not follow any obvious topographical features.

Suebi

SueviSuevicSueves
In the late Roman period, as the empire came under pressure from many such "barbarian" peoples, a powerful group of Burgundians and other Vandalic tribes moved westwards towards the Roman frontiers along the Rhine Valley, making them neighbors of the Franks who formed their kingdoms to the north, and the Suebic Alemanni who were settling to their south, also near the Rhine. The dominant groups were Alans, Vandals (Hasdingi and Silingi), and Danubian Suevi (probably descended from Marcomanni and Quadi).
The Vandals were tribes east of the Elbe, including the well-known Silingi, Goths, and Burgundians, an area that Tacitus treated as Suebic.

Rugii

RugiansRugianHolmrygr
Around the mid 2nd century AD, there was a significant migration by Germanic tribes of Scandinavian origin (Rugii, Goths, Gepidae, Vandals, Burgundians, and others) towards the south-east, creating turmoil along the entire Roman frontier.
Around the mid 2nd century AD, there was a significant migration by Germanic tribes of Scandinavian origin (Rugii, Goths, Gepidae, Vandals, Burgundians, and others) towards the south-east, creating turmoil along the entire Roman frontier.

Nibelungenlied

NibelungenDas NibelungenliedRheingold
The destruction of Worms and the Burgundian kingdom by the Huns became the subject of heroic legends that were afterwards incorporated in the Nibelungenlied—on which Wagner based his Ring Cycle—where King Gunther (Gundahar) and Queen Brünhild hold their court at Worms, and Siegfried comes to woo Kriemhild.
The poem is split into two parts: in the first part, Siegfried comes to Worms to acquire the hand of the Burgundian princess Kriemhild from her brother King Gunther.

Sigismund of Burgundy

SigismundSaint SigismundKing Sigismund
The poet and early mythologist Viktor Rydberg (1828–1895), (Our Fathers' Godsaga) asserted from an early medieval source, Vita Sigismundi, that they themselves retained oral traditions about their Scandinavian origin.
Chlodomer marched with his brother Theuderic I, King of Metz, on Burgundy in 524.

Sigurd

SiegfriedSiegfried of XantenSigurðr
The destruction of Worms and the Burgundian kingdom by the Huns became the subject of heroic legends that were afterwards incorporated in the Nibelungenlied—on which Wagner based his Ring Cycle—where King Gunther (Gundahar) and Queen Brünhild hold their court at Worms, and Siegfried comes to woo Kriemhild.
In both the Norse and continental Germanic tradition, Sigurd is portrayed as dying as the result of a quarrel between his wife (Gudrun/Kriemhild) and another woman, Brunhild, whom he has tricked into marrying the Burgundian king Gunnar/Gunther.

Jovinus

In 411, the Burgundian king Gundahar (or Gundicar) set up a puppet emperor, Jovinus, in cooperation with Goar, king of the Alans.
Following the defeat of the usurper known as Constantine III, Jovinus was proclaimed emperor at Mainz in 411, a puppet supported by Gundahar, king of the Burgundians, and Goar, king of the Alans.

Lyon

Lyon, FranceLyonsLyon-Parilly
Though the precise geography is uncertain, Sapaudia corresponds to the modern-day Savoy, and the Burgundians probably lived near Lugdunum, known today as Lyon.
Burgundians fleeing the destruction of Worms by the Huns in 437 were re-settled at Lugdunum.

Brunhild

BrünnhildeBrynhildBrynhildr
The destruction of Worms and the Burgundian kingdom by the Huns became the subject of heroic legends that were afterwards incorporated in the Nibelungenlied—on which Wagner based his Ring Cycle—where King Gunther (Gundahar) and Queen Brünhild hold their court at Worms, and Siegfried comes to woo Kriemhild.
In both traditions, she is instrumental in bringing about the death of the hero Sigurd or Siegfried after he deceives her into marrying the Burgundian king Gunther or Gunnar.

Probus (emperor)

ProbusEmperor ProbusMarcus Aurelius Probus
Zosimus (1.68) reports them being defeated by the emperor Probus in 278 in Gaul.
Meanwhile, his generals defeated the Franks and these operations were directed to clearing Gaul of Germanic invaders (Franks and Burgundians), allowing Probus to adopt the titles of Gothicus Maximus and Germanicus Maximus.

Battle of the Catalaunian Plains

Battle of ChâlonsCatalaunian PlainsBattle of Chalons
As allies of Rome in its last decades, the Burgundians fought alongside Aëtius and a confederation of Visigoths and others in the battle against Attila at the Battle of Châlons (also called "The Battle of the Catalaunian Fields") in 451.
The Burgundians in Sapaudia were more submissive, but likewise awaiting an opening for revolt.

Goar

In 411, the Burgundian king Gundahar (or Gundicar) set up a puppet emperor, Jovinus, in cooperation with Goar, king of the Alans.
Goar next appears in 411, when he and Gundahar, king of the Burgundians, joined in setting up the Gallo-Roman senator Jovinus as Roman Emperor at Mainz (as described by Olympiodorus of Thebes).

Valentinian I

ValentinianValentinian I the GreatValentinian the Great
In 369/370, the Emperor Valentinian I enlisted the aid of the Burgundians in his war against the Alemanni.
Valentinian meanwhile tried to persuade the Burgundians – bitter enemies of the Alamanni – to attack Macrian, a powerful Alamannic chieftain.

Alans

AlanAlanicAlanian
In 411, the Burgundian king Gundahar (or Gundicar) set up a puppet emperor, Jovinus, in cooperation with Goar, king of the Alans. The dominant groups were Alans, Vandals (Hasdingi and Silingi), and Danubian Suevi (probably descended from Marcomanni and Quadi).
Under Goar, they allied with the Burgundians led by Gundaharius, with whom they installed the Emperor Jovinus as usurper.