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Moses

MosaicMosheMusa
In the biblical narrative, the burning bush is the location at which Moses was appointed by Yahweh (God) to lead the Israelites out of Egypt and into Canaan.
After killing an Egyptian slavemaster (because the slavemaster was smiting a Hebrew), Moses fled across the Red Sea to Midian, where he encountered The Angel of the Lord, speaking to him from within a burning bush on Mount Horeb (which he regarded as the Mountain of God).

I Am that I Am

I am who I ama sacred name of GodEheieh
The text derives Yahweh from the Hebrew word hayah in the phrase ehyeh ašer ehyeh, meaning "he who is he", or "I am that I am".
Its context is the encounter of the burning bush (Exodus 3:14): Moses asks what he is to say to the Israelites when they ask what God has sent him to them, and Yahweh replies, "I am who I am," adding, "Say this to the people of Israel, 'I am has sent me to you.'" ’Ehyeh is the first person form of hayah, "to be", and owing to the peculiarities of Hebrew grammar means both "I am", "I was", and "I will be".

Book of Exodus

ExodusEx.Shemot
The burning bush is an object described by the Book of Exodus as being located on Mount Horeb. It is possible that the reference to a burning bush is based on a mistaken interpretation of Sinai ( Sînāy), a mountain described in Exodus 19:18 as being on fire.
There he marries Zipporah, the daughter of Midianite priest Jethro, and encounters God in a burning bush.

Mount Horeb

HorebRock of Horeb
The burning bush is an object described by the Book of Exodus as being located on Mount Horeb.
The name Horeb first occurs at, with the story of Moses and the burning bush.

Elohist

EElohist (E)
Some Old Testament scholars regard the account of the burning bush as being spliced together from the Yahwist and Elohist texts, with the Angel of Yahweh and the removal of sandals being part of the Yahwist version, and the Elohist's parallels to these being God and the turning away of Moses's face, respectively.
In the E source God's name is always presented as "Elohim" or "El" until the revelation of God's name to Moses, after which God is referred to as "YHWH".

Staff of Moses

his staffthe staff of MosesRod of God
Among other things, his staff was transmuted into a snake, Moses's hand was temporarily made leprous, and water was transmuted into blood, In the text, Yahweh instructs Moses to take "this staff" in his hands, in order to perform miracles with it, as if it is a staff given to him, rather than his own; some textual scholars propose that this latter instruction is the Elohist's version of the more detailed earlier description, where Moses uses his own staff, which they attribute to the Yahwist.
The staff is first mentioned in the Book of Exodus (chapter 4, verse 2), when God appears to Moses in the burning bush.

Biblical Mount Sinai

Mount SinaiSinaiMt. Sinai
It is possible that the reference to a burning bush is based on a mistaken interpretation of Sinai ( Sînāy), a mountain described in Exodus 19:18 as being on fire.
In the 6th century, Saint Catherine's Monastery was constructed at the base of this mountain at a site which is claimed to be the site of the biblical burning bush.

God

supreme beingLordCreator
In the biblical narrative, the burning bush is the location at which Moses was appointed by Yahweh (God) to lead the Israelites out of Egypt and into Canaan.
The burning bush that was not consumed by the flames is described in Book of Exodus as a symbolic representation of God when he appeared to Moses.

Rubus ulmifolius subsp. sanctus

Rubus sanctusRubus ulmifolius'' subsp. ''sanctus
The bush growing at the spot (a bramble, scientific name Rubus sanctus), was later transplanted several yards away to a courtyard of the monastery, and its original spot was covered by a chapel dedicated to the Annunciation, with a silver star marking where the roots of the bush had come out of the ground.
An instance of it can be found at the Chapel of the Burning Bush on Mount Sinai, where it is revered as the original burning bush of the Bible.

Dictamnus

Dictamnus albusburning-bushdittany
Alexander and Zhenia Fleisher relate the Biblical story of the burning bush to the plant Dictamnus.
The name "burning bush" derives from the volatile oils produced by the plant, which can catch fire readily in hot weather, leading to comparisons with the burning bush of the Bible, including the suggestion that this is the plant involved there.

Saint Catherine's Monastery

Orthodox Church of Mount SinaiSaint Catherine AreaSinai
However, in the 4th century, under the Byzantine Empire, the monastery built there was abandoned in favour of the newer belief that Mount Saint Catherine was the Biblical Mount Sinai; a new monastery – Saint Catherine's Monastery – was built at its foot, and the alleged site of the biblical burning bush was identified.
The monastery was built by order of Emperor Justinian I (reigned 527–565), enclosing the Chapel of the Burning Bush (also known as "Saint Helen's Chapel") ordered to be built by Empress Consort Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, at the site where Moses is supposed to have seen the burning bush.

Israelites

IsraeliteIsraelchildren of Israel
In the biblical narrative, the burning bush is the location at which Moses was appointed by Yahweh (God) to lead the Israelites out of Egypt and into Canaan.
When he is eighty years old, Moses is tending a herd of sheep in solitude on Mount Sinai when he sees a desert shrub that is burning but is not consumed.

Eastern Orthodox Church

OrthodoxEastern OrthodoxEastern Orthodoxy
In Eastern Orthodoxy a tradition exists, originating in the Orthodox Fathers of the Church and its Ecumenical Synods (or Councils), that the flame Moses saw was in fact God's Uncreated Energies/Glory, manifested as light, thus explaining why the bush was not consumed.
In Orthodox theology, the Mother of God is the fulfillment of the Old Testament archetypes revealed in the Ark of the Covenant (because she carried the New Covenant in the person of Christ) and the burning bush that appeared before Moses (symbolizing the Mother of God's carrying of God without being consumed).

Church of Scotland

KirkScottish ChurchPresbyterian
The motto of the Church of Scotland is Nec tamen consumebatur, Latin for "Yet it was not consumed", an allusion to the biblical description of the burning bush, and a stylised depiction of the burning bush is used as the Church's symbol. Usage dates from the 1690s.
The motto of the Church of Scotland is nec tamen consumebatur (Latin)—'Yet it was not consumed', an allusion to Exodus 3:2 and the Burning Bush.

Presbyterian Church in Ireland

PresbyterianPresbyterian ChurchIrish Presbyterian
The Burning Bush is also used as the basis of the symbol of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland, which uses the Latin motto Ardens sed virens, meaning "Burning but flourishing", and is based on the biblical description of the burning bush. The same logo is used from the separated Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster.
It is usually seen alongside the Burning Bush, the church's symbol.

Reformed Church of France

ProtestantReformed ChurchFrench Reformed
The current symbol of the Reformed Church of France is a burning bush with the Huguenot cross.
The official logo of the former reformed churches was the "burning bush".

Theophany

theophaniesepiphanytheophanic
* Theophany
In Midian, while Moses was keeping the flock of his father in law Jethro, the angel of the Lord appeared to Moses in a bush that burned but was not consumed . Yahweh called to Moses out of the midst of the bush, and told him that he had heard the affliction of his people in Egypt, and gave Moses orders to speak to Pharaoh and to lead the Israelites out of Egypt.

Benny Shanon

Shannon, BennyShanon, Benny
Professor Benny Shanon 's controversial hypothesis speculates that the key event of the Old Testament might refer to a psychedelic experience with DMT.
Moses' vision of the burning bush

Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand

Presbyterian ChurchPresbyterianPresbyterianism
The burning bush is also the symbol of the Presbyterian Church in Canada, Presbyterian Church in Australia crest, Presbyterian Church of Eastern Australia with the motto in English since its foundation in 1846: 'And the Bush was not consumed', Presbyterian Church in New Zealand, Presbyterian Church in Taiwan, Presbyterian Church in Singapore, Presbyterian Church of Brazil, the Presbyterian Church in Malaysia, the Free Reformed Churches of North America, and the Christian Reformed Churches in the Netherlands.

Jewish Theological Seminary of America

Jewish Theological SeminaryJTSThe Jewish Theological Seminary
The logo of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America is also an image of the Burning Bush with the phrase "and the bush was not consumed" in both English and in Hebrew.

Yahweh

GodYahGod of Israel
In the biblical narrative, the burning bush is the location at which Moses was appointed by Yahweh (God) to lead the Israelites out of Egypt and into Canaan.

Egypt

🇪🇬EgyptianEGY
In the biblical narrative, the burning bush is the location at which Moses was appointed by Yahweh (God) to lead the Israelites out of Egypt and into Canaan.

Canaan

Canaaniteland of CanaanCanaanites
In the biblical narrative, the burning bush is the location at which Moses was appointed by Yahweh (God) to lead the Israelites out of Egypt and into Canaan.

Bramble

bramblesbramble fruitbramble fruits
The Hebrew word in the narrative that is translated into English as bush is seneh ( səneh), which refers in particular to brambles; seneh is a biblical dis legomenon, only appearing in two places, both of which describe the burning bush.

Hapax legomenon

hapax legomenahapaxappear only once
The Hebrew word in the narrative that is translated into English as bush is seneh ( səneh), which refers in particular to brambles; seneh is a biblical dis legomenon, only appearing in two places, both of which describe the burning bush.