A report on Burundi and Hutu

A traditional Hutu throwing knife.
Hutu and other Rwandan children in Virunga National Park
Flag of the Kingdom of Burundi (1962–1966).
Independence Square and monument in Bujumbura.
Belligerents of the Second Congo War. Burundi backed the rebels.
View of the capital city Bujumbura in 2006.
Pierre Nkurunziza, President of Burundi in 2005–2020.
Embassy of Burundi in Brussels
Map of Burundi.
Hippos at Kibira National Park in the Northwest of Burundi
A proportional representation of Burundi exports, 2019
Historical development of GDP per capita
Graphical depiction of Burundi's product exports in 28 colour-coded categories in 2009.
Fishermen on Lake Tanganyika.
Bujumbura International Airport terminal in Bujumbura
Bicycles are a popular means of transport in Burundi
Men in colourful dresses and drums
Children in Bujumbura, Burundi
Drums from Gitega.
Football in Burundi.
Carolus Magnus School in Burundi. The school benefits from the campaign "Your Day for Africa" by Aktion Tagwerk.

They mainly live in Rwanda, Burundi and the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, where they form one of the principal ethnic groups alongside the Tutsi and the Great Lakes Twa.

- Hutu

The Twa, Hutu and Tutsi peoples have lived in Burundi for at least 500 years.

- Burundi

9 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Rwanda

5 links

Landlocked country in the Great Rift Valley of Central Africa, where the African Great Lakes region and Southeast Africa converge.

Landlocked country in the Great Rift Valley of Central Africa, where the African Great Lakes region and Southeast Africa converge.

A reconstruction of the ancient King's Palace at Nyanza
Juvénal Habyarimana, president from 1973 to 1994
Human skulls at the Nyamata Genocide Memorial
Rwandan President Paul Kagame
Chamber of Deputies building
Provinces of Rwanda
The Kagera and Ruvubu rivers, part of the upper Nile
Lake and volcano in the Virunga Mountains
Volcanoes National Park is the home of the largest population of Mountain Gorillas in the world.
Giraffe in Akagera National Park
Estimated development of real GDP per capita in Rwanda, since 1950
Coffee beans drying in Maraba. Coffee is one of Rwanda's major cash crops.
Mountain gorillas in Volcanoes National Park
Rural water pump
Rural children
Children in a Rwandan primary school, using laptops supplied by the One Laptop Per Child program
Butaro Hospital at Burera, Northern Province
Historical development of life expectancy in Rwanda
Roman Catholic church in Rwamagana
Traditional Rwandan intore dancers
Rwandan woven agaseke basket
Adrien Niyonshuti, "one of the most famous people in Rwanda", competing in the cross-country mountain biking event at the 2012 Summer Olympics
Topography of Rwanda
Graphical depiction of Rwanda's product exports.
Rwanda produced 2.6 million tons of banana in 2019, its largest cash crop.
Rwanda electricity production by source
A plate of ugali and cabbage.

Located a few degrees south of the Equator, Rwanda is bordered by Uganda, Tanzania, Burundi, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

However, within this group there are three subgroups: the Hutu, Tutsi and Twa.

Reconstruction of the King of Rwanda's palace at Nyanza

Rwandan Revolution

4 links

Reconstruction of the King of Rwanda's palace at Nyanza
A 1916 postage stamp from the Belgian Occupied East African Territories, captured during the East African Campaign in World War I
A royalist pin badge with the slogan "Vive Kigeli V" ("Long live Kigeli V") dating to the period of the Rwandan Revolution
The flag of Rwanda which received independence in 1962
Tutsi refugees fleeing to Uganda with their cattle (January 1964)

The Rwandan Revolution, also known as the Hutu Revolution, Social Revolution, or Wind of Destruction (muyaga), was a period of ethnic violence in Rwanda from 1959 to 1961 between the Hutu and the Tutsi, two of the three ethnic groups in Rwanda.

Belgian forces took control of Rwanda and Burundi during World War I, and the country came under Belgian control in a 1919 League of Nations mandate, named Ruanda-Urundi.

Paul Kagame, a Tutsi and the President of Rwanda

Tutsi

3 links

Ethnic group of the African Great Lakes region.

Ethnic group of the African Great Lakes region.

Paul Kagame, a Tutsi and the President of Rwanda
Ange Kagame, daughter of Paul Kagame.
Flag of the Tutsi-led Rwandan Patriotic Front.
A traditional Tutsi wrist guard (igitembe).
A traditional Tutsi basket.

They are a Bantu-speaking ethnic group and the second largest of three main ethnic groups in Rwanda and Burundi (the other two being the largest Bantu ethnic group Hutu and the Pygmy group of the Twa).

Contemporary United States Central Intelligence Agency map of Burundi showing areas of Hutu rebel activity and refugee concentrations from the Ikiza

Ikiza

2 links

Contemporary United States Central Intelligence Agency map of Burundi showing areas of Hutu rebel activity and refugee concentrations from the Ikiza
Burundi (red) was bordered by Rwanda to the north, Zaire to the west, and Tanzania to the east
Ntare V of Burundi in 1966
Artémon Simbananiye directed the killings of Hutus

The Ikiza (variously translated from Kirundi as the Catastrophe, the Great Calamity, and the Scourge), or the Ubwicanyi (Killings), was a series of mass killings—often characterised as a genocide—which were committed in Burundi in 1972 by the Tutsi-dominated army and government, primarily against educated and elite Hutus who lived in the country.

Ruanda-Urundi

3 links

Colonial territory, once part of German East Africa, which was ruled by Belgium from 1916 to 1962.

Colonial territory, once part of German East Africa, which was ruled by Belgium from 1916 to 1962.

Ruanda-Urundi (dark green) depicted within the Belgian colonial empire (light green), c. 1935
A Belgian Congo stamp overprinted for the Belgian Occupied East African Territories in 1916
Ruanda-Urundi (dark green) depicted within the Belgian colonial empire (light green), c. 1935
The Cathedral of Our Lady of Wisdom at Butare (formally Astrida) in Ruanda. Catholicism expanded rapidly under the Belgian mandate.
Ruandan labour migrants at the Kisanga copper mine in Katanga (Belgian Congo) in c. undefined 1930
Monument in Bujumbura commemorating Burundi's independence on 1 July 1962
In 1929
In 1938

In practice, they developed a Tutsi ruling class to formally control a mostly Hutu population, through the system of chiefs and sub-chiefs under the overall rule of the two Mwami.

It took two more years before the government of the two became wholly separate and two other years until the proclamation of the Republic of Burundi.

Democratic Republic of the Congo

1 links

Country in Central Africa.

Country in Central Africa.

View of Leopoldville Station and Port in 1884
1908 photograph of a married Christian couple.
Force Publique soldiers in the Belgian Congo in 1918. At its peak, the Force Publique had around 19,000 Congolese soldiers, led by 420 Belgian officers.
The leader of ABAKO, Joseph Kasa-Vubu, first democratically elected President of Congo-Léopoldville
Patrice Lumumba, first democratically elected Prime Minister of the Congo-Léopoldville, was murdered by Belgian-supported Katangan separatists in 1961
Mobutu Sese Seko and Richard Nixon in Washington, D.C., 1973.
Mobutu with the Dutch Prince Bernhard in Kinshasa in 1973
Belligerents of the Second Congo War
Refugees in the Congo
People fleeing their villages due to fighting between FARDC and rebel groups, North Kivu, 2012
Government troops near Goma during the M23 rebellion in May 2013
DR Congo's President Félix Tshisekedi with neighbouring Congolese President Denis Sassou Nguesso in 2020; both wear face masks due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
The map of the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Democratic Republic of the Congo map of Köppen climate classification
Ituri Rainforest
Mount Nyiragongo, which last erupted in 2021.
Salonga National Park.
Masisi Territory
Lake Kivu in North Kivu province
Bas-Congo landscape
An Okapi
A male western gorilla
Hippopotami
Joseph Kabila was President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo from January 2001 to January 2019.
President Joseph Kabila with U.S. President Barack Obama in August 2014
FARDC soldiers on patrol in Ituri province
A group of demobilized child soldiers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
A proportional representation of Democratic Republic of the Congo exports, 2019
Change in per capita GDP of Congo, 1950–2018. Figures are inflation-adjusted to 2011 International dollars.
Rough diamonds ≈1 to 1.5 mm in size from DR Congo.
DR Congo's Human Development Index scores, 1970–2010.
Collecting firewood in Basankusu.
Train from Lubumbashi arriving in Kindu on a newly refurbished line.
Map of rail network
Major Bantu languages in the Congo
Kongo youth and adults in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
Amani festival in Goma
Family in Rutshuru, North Kivu, Democratic Republic of the Congo
The population pyramid of the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Our Lady of Peace Cathedral in Bukavu
A classroom in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
Development of life expectancy in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Population fleeing their villages due to fighting between FARDC and rebels groups, Sake North Kivu 30 April 2012
A Hemba male statue
Stade des Martyrs in Kinshasa.
The Sts. Peter and Paul Cathedral, Lubumbashi

The DRC is located in sub-Saharan Africa, bordered to the northwest by the Republic of the Congo, to the north by the Central African Republic, to the northeast by South Sudan, to the east by Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi, and by Tanzania (across Lake Tanganyika), to the south and southeast by Zambia, to the southwest by Angola, and to the west by the South Atlantic Ocean and the Cabinda exclave of Angola.

By 1996, following the Rwandan Civil War and genocide and the ascension of a Tutsi-led government in Rwanda, Rwandan Hutu militia forces (Interahamwe) fled to eastern Zaire and used refugee camps as bases for incursions against Rwanda.

Mutwa with traditional bow and arrow

Great Lakes Twa

1 links

The Great Lakes Twa, also known as Batwa, Abatwa or Ge-Sera, are a Bantu ethnic group native to the African Great Lakes region on the border of Central and East Africa.

The Great Lakes Twa, also known as Batwa, Abatwa or Ge-Sera, are a Bantu ethnic group native to the African Great Lakes region on the border of Central and East Africa.

Mutwa with traditional bow and arrow
Batwa women with traditional pottery
A traditional dance of the Batwa
Pygmy boy in the village Shasha in North Kivu during 2007 conflicts.
The northern Twa. The easternmost group are the Great Lakes Twa.

Current populations of Great Lakes Twa people live in the states of Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda and the eastern portion of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

When the Hutu, a Bantu-speaking people, arrived in the region, they subjugated 'bush people' (hunter-gatherers) they called Abatwa, which are generally assumed to be the ancestors of the Twa today, though it may be that the Twa arrived alongside the Hutu, and either were a distinct people from the original inhabitants, or have mixed ancestry.

President Ndadaye in 1993

Melchior Ndadaye

1 links

President Ndadaye in 1993
Ndadaye speaking at a FRODEBU rally following his electoral victory in 1993
Ndadaye greeting Prime Minister Sylvie Kinigi at Bujumbura airport, 1993
Ndadaye's casket lowered into his grave

Melchior Ndadaye (28 March 1953 – 21 October 1993) was a Burundian intellectual and politician.

He was the first democratically elected and first Hutu president of Burundi after winning the landmark 1993 election.

The Kirundi text on the back of the truck warns cyclists not to hold on to it.

Kirundi

0 links

The Kirundi text on the back of the truck warns cyclists not to hold on to it.

Kirundi, also known as Rundi, is a Bantu language spoken by some 9 million people in Burundi and adjacent parts of Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, as well as in Uganda.

Kirundi is natively spoken by the Hutu, including Bakiga and other related ethnicities, as well as Tutsi, Twa and Hima among others have adopted the language.