Busicom

Busicom Corp.
Busicom was a Japanese company that owned the rights to Intel's first microprocessor, the Intel 4004, which they created in partnership with Intel in 1970.wikipedia
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Intel 4004

40044004 (MCS-4) projectfirst commercially available microprocessor (Intel 4004)
Busicom was a Japanese company that owned the rights to Intel's first microprocessor, the Intel 4004, which they created in partnership with Intel in 1970.
The first commercial sale of the fully operational 4004 occurred in March 1971 to Busicom Corp. of Japan for which it was originally designed and built as a custom chip.

Microprocessor

microprocessorsprocessorchip
Busicom was a Japanese company that owned the rights to Intel's first microprocessor, the Intel 4004, which they created in partnership with Intel in 1970.
Building on an earlier Busicom design from 1969, Intel introduced the first commercial microprocessor, the 4-bit Intel 4004, in 1971, followed by its 8-bit microprocessor 8008 in 1972.

Calculator

pocket calculatorcalculatorselectronic calculator
Busicom asked Intel to design a set of integrated circuits for a new line of programmable electronic calculators in 1969.
Pocket-sized devices became available in the 1970s, especially after the Intel 4004, the first microprocessor, was developed by Intel for the Japanese calculator company Busicom.

Integrated circuit

integrated circuitsmicrochipchip
Busicom asked Intel to design a set of integrated circuits for a new line of programmable electronic calculators in 1969.
The 4004 was designed by Busicom's Masatoshi Shima and Intel's Ted Hoff in 1969, but it was Faggin's improved design in 1970 that made it a reality.

Intel

Intel CorporationIntel Corp. Intel Corporation
Busicom was a Japanese company that owned the rights to Intel's first microprocessor, the Intel 4004, which they created in partnership with Intel in 1970. Busicom asked Intel to design a set of integrated circuits for a new line of programmable electronic calculators in 1969.
Originally developed for the Japanese company Busicom to replace a number of ASICs in a calculator already produced by Busicom, the Intel 4004 was introduced to the mass market on November 15, 1971, though the microprocessor did not become the core of Intel's business until the mid-1980s.

Tadashi Sasaki (engineer)

Tadashi SasakiSasaki Tadashi
People who were influential in convincing Busicom to switch to using microprocessors were Tadashi Sasaki and Robert Noyce.
Tadashi Sasaki was a Japanese engineer who was influential in founding Busicom, driving the deployment of the Intel 4004 microprocessor, and later driving Sharp into the LCD calculator market.

Odhner Arithmometer

BrunsvigaOdhner's ArithmometerOdhner type
Originally, they made Odhner type mechanical calculators and then moved on to electronic calculators always using state of the art designs.
In Russia Felix and in Japan Tiger and Busicom which, incidentally, was made famous because Intel created the first microprocessor, the Intel 4004, while designing one of their electronic calculators in 1970.

Japan

🇯🇵JPNJapanese
Busicom was a Japanese company that owned the rights to Intel's first microprocessor, the Intel 4004, which they created in partnership with Intel in 1970.

Light-emitting diode

LEDLEDslight emitting diodes
Their entry based calculators, the Busicom LE-120A (Handy-LE) and LE-120S (Handy), were the first to fit in a pocket and also the first calculators to use an LED display.

Read-only memory

ROMROMsread-only
In order to limit production cost, Busicom wanted to design a calculator engine that would be based on a few integrated circuits (ICs), containing some ROMs and shift registers and that could be adapted to a broad range of calculators by just changing the ROM IC chips.

Shift register

shift registersCirculating Memory
In order to limit production cost, Busicom wanted to design a calculator engine that would be based on a few integrated circuits (ICs), containing some ROMs and shift registers and that could be adapted to a broad range of calculators by just changing the ROM IC chips.

Random-access memory

RAMmemoryrandom access memory
Busicom's engineers came up with a design that required 12 ICs and asked Intel, a company founded one year earlier in 1968 for the purpose of making solid state random-access memory (RAM), to finalize and manufacture their calculator engine.

Robert Noyce

Robert N. NoyceNoyce, RobertRobert H. Noyce
People who were influential in convincing Busicom to switch to using microprocessors were Tadashi Sasaki and Robert Noyce.

Marcian Hoff

Ted HoffMarcian E. Hoff, Jr.Marcian Edward Hoff Jr.
Intel's Ted Hoff was assigned to studying Busicom's design, and came up with a much more elegant, 4 ICs architecture centered on what was to become the 4004 microprocessor surrounded by a mixture of 3 different ICs containing ROM, shift registers, input/output ports and RAM—Intel's first product (1969) was the 3101 Schottky TTL bipolar 64-bit SRAM.

Schottky barrier

SchottkySchottky contactSchottky (rectifying) contact
Intel's Ted Hoff was assigned to studying Busicom's design, and came up with a much more elegant, 4 ICs architecture centered on what was to become the 4004 microprocessor surrounded by a mixture of 3 different ICs containing ROM, shift registers, input/output ports and RAM—Intel's first product (1969) was the 3101 Schottky TTL bipolar 64-bit SRAM.

Transistor–transistor logic

TTLtransistor-transistor logicTTL logic
Intel's Ted Hoff was assigned to studying Busicom's design, and came up with a much more elegant, 4 ICs architecture centered on what was to become the 4004 microprocessor surrounded by a mixture of 3 different ICs containing ROM, shift registers, input/output ports and RAM—Intel's first product (1969) was the 3101 Schottky TTL bipolar 64-bit SRAM.

Bipolar junction transistor

bipolar transistorbipolarbipolar transistors
Intel's Ted Hoff was assigned to studying Busicom's design, and came up with a much more elegant, 4 ICs architecture centered on what was to become the 4004 microprocessor surrounded by a mixture of 3 different ICs containing ROM, shift registers, input/output ports and RAM—Intel's first product (1969) was the 3101 Schottky TTL bipolar 64-bit SRAM.

Static random-access memory

SRAMstatic RAMstatic random access memory
Intel's Ted Hoff was assigned to studying Busicom's design, and came up with a much more elegant, 4 ICs architecture centered on what was to become the 4004 microprocessor surrounded by a mixture of 3 different ICs containing ROM, shift registers, input/output ports and RAM—Intel's first product (1969) was the 3101 Schottky TTL bipolar 64-bit SRAM.

Federico Faggin

Faggin, FedericoFaggin, Federico
Busicom's management agreed to Hoff's new approach and the chips' implementation was led by Federico Faggin who had previously developed the Silicon Gate Technology at Fairchild Semiconductor.

Chipset

chipsetschip setchip
A few months later, on November 15, 1971, Intel announced the immediate availability of the first microprocessor chipset family, the MCS-4 micro computer set (all from the Busicom design) with an advertisement in Electronic News.

Bristol

Bristol, EnglandCity of BristolCity and County of Bristol
Broughtons of Bristol is a company selling and maintaining a broad line of business machines.

IEEE Spectrum

SpectrumIEEE Spectrum Magazine
Chip Hall of Fame: Intel 4004 Microprocessor (IEEE Spectrum website)

List of Intel microprocessors

IntelIntel processorsIntel microprocessor
Originally designed to be used in Busicom calculator

History of computing hardware (1960s–present)

compared to the computers of todaycomputers manufactured after 1960dawn of the personal computer era
It was developed for a Japanese calculator company called Busicom as an alternative to hardwired circuitry, but computers were developed around it, with much of their processing abilities provided by one small microprocessor chip.

History of science and technology in Japan

The first truly pocket-sized electronic calculator was the Busicom LE-120A "HANDY", the first single-chip calculator to be built, released in February 1971.