CBS

Columbia Broadcasting SystemCBS TelevisionCBS-TVCBS Television NetworkCBS RadioCBS NetworkCBS Inc.Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS)CBS NewsCBS Studios
CBS (an initialism of the network's former name, the Columbia Broadcasting System) is an American English language commercial broadcast television and radio network that is a flagship property of CBS Corporation.wikipedia
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William S. Paley

Jaclyn StableWilliam PaleyBill Paley
It has also been called the "Tiffany Network", alluding to the perceived high quality of CBS programming during the tenure of William S. Paley.
William Samuel Paley (September 28, 1901 – October 26, 1990) was the chief executive who built the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) from a small radio network into one of the foremost radio and television network operations in the United States.

CBS Broadcast Center

CBS ControlCBS StudiosManhattan facility
The company is headquartered at the CBS Building in New York City with major production facilities and operations in New York City (at the CBS Broadcast Center) and Los Angeles (at CBS Television City and the CBS Studio Center).
It is CBS's main East Coast production center, much as CBS Television City in Los Angeles is the West Coast hub.

Westinghouse Electric Corporation

WestinghouseWestinghouse ElectricWestinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company
In 1974, CBS dropped its former full name and became known simply as CBS, Inc. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation acquired the network in 1995, renamed its corporate entity to the current CBS Broadcasting, Inc. in 1997, and eventually adopted the name of the company it had acquired to become CBS Corporation.
The corporation purchased the CBS broadcasting company in 1995 and became the original CBS Corporation in 1997.

CBS Television City

Television CityAmerican Idol studioCBS Studios
The company is headquartered at the CBS Building in New York City with major production facilities and operations in New York City (at the CBS Broadcast Center) and Los Angeles (at CBS Television City and the CBS Studio Center).
Designed by architect William Pereira, it is one of two CBS television studios in southern California — the other is CBS Studio Center, located in the Studio City section of the San Fernando Valley, which houses additional production facilities and the network's Los Angeles local television operations (KCBS and KCAL).

Big Three television networks

Big ThreeBig Three networksBig Three network
Under Paley's guidance, CBS would first become one of the largest radio networks in the United States, and eventually one of the Big Three American broadcast television networks.
The Big Three television networks are the three major traditional commercial broadcast television networks in the United States: the American Broadcasting Company (ABC), CBS (formerly known as the Columbia Broadcasting System) and the National Broadcasting Company (NBC).

Owned-and-operated station

owned-and-operatedO&Oowned and operated
Prior to then, CBS Radio mainly provided news and features content for its portfolio owned-and-operated radio stations in large and mid-sized markets, and affiliated radio stations in various other markets.
For example, WBFS-TV in Miami is owned by the CBS network's parent company CBS Corporation, but airs programming from MyNetworkTV; it is a MyNetworkTV affiliate.

Viacom

StreamrollerViacom New MediaViacom Inc.
CBS Corporation is controlled by Sumner Redstone through National Amusements, which also controls the current Viacom.
In March 2005, the prior Viacom announced plans of looking into splitting the company into two publicly traded companies because of a stagnating stock price and the rivalry between Leslie Moonves and Tom Freston, longtime heads of CBS and MTV Networks respectively.

Arthur Judson

The origins of CBS date back to January 27, 1927, with the creation of the "United Independent Broadcasters" network in Chicago by New York City talent-agent Arthur Judson.
Arthur Leon Judson (February 17, 1881, Dayton, Ohio – January 28, 1975, Rye, New York) was an artists' manager who also managed the New York Philharmonic and Philadelphia Orchestra and founder of CBS.

Flagship (broadcasting)

flagship stationflagshipflagship stations
Columbia Phonographic went on the air on September 18, 1927, with a presentation by the Howard L. Barlow Orchestra from flagship station WOR in Newark, New Jersey, and fifteen affiliates.
Masters Tournament from WRDW-TV, as the CBS affiliate since 1956.

Paramount Pictures

ParamountParamount StudiosParamount Home Entertainment
In the fall of 1928, he entered into talks with Adolph Zukor of Paramount Pictures, who planned to move into radio in response to RCA's forays into motion pictures with the advent of talkies.
Through the teens and twenties, he built the Publix Theatres Corporation, a chain of nearly 2,000 screens, ran two production studios (in Astoria, New York, now the Kaufman Astoria Studios, and Hollywood, California), and became an early investor in radio, taking a 50% interest in the new Columbia Broadcasting System in 1928 (selling it within a few years; this would not be the last time Paramount and CBS crossed paths).

Edward R. Murrow

Ed MurrowEdward MurrowMurrow
A key early hire was Edward R. Murrow in 1935; his first corporate title was Director of Talks.
He first gained prominence during World War II with a series of live radio broadcasts from Europe for the news division of CBS.

Eric Sevareid

For More: See Honors
Murrow began assembling the staff of broadcast journalists – including William L. Shirer, Charles Collingwood, Bill Downs, and Eric Sevareid – who would become known as the "Murrow Boys".
Arnold Eric Sevareid (November 26, 1912 – July 9, 1992) was an American author and CBS news journalist from 1939 to 1977.

NBC

National Broadcasting CompanyNBC-TVNBC Television
Rival NBC paid affiliates for every sponsored show they carried and charged them for every sustaining show they ran.
In 1934, the Mutual Broadcasting System filed a complaint to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), following the government agency's creation, claiming it ran into difficulties trying to establish new radio stations in a market largely controlled by NBC and the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS).

CBS Building

Black RockCBS HeadquartersBroadcasting Building
The company is headquartered at the CBS Building in New York City with major production facilities and operations in New York City (at the CBS Broadcast Center) and Los Angeles (at CBS Television City and the CBS Studio Center).
The building was the result of intricate planning between Eero Saarinen and CBS's then-president, Frank Stanton.

Paul White (journalist)

Paul WhitePaul W. White
In the fall of 1934, CBS launched an independent news division, shaped in its first years by Paley's vice-president, former New York Times columnist Ed Klauber, and news director Paul White.
Paul Welrose White (June 6, 1902 – July 9, 1955) was an American journalist and news director who founded the Columbia Broadcasting System's news division in 1933 and directed it for 13 years.

Murrow Boys

Edward R. Murrow's BoysMurrow's Boys
Murrow began assembling the staff of broadcast journalists – including William L. Shirer, Charles Collingwood, Bill Downs, and Eric Sevareid – who would become known as the "Murrow Boys".
The Murrow Boys, or Murrow's Boys, were the CBS broadcast journalists most closely associated with Edward R. Murrow during his time at the network, most notably in the years before and during World War II.

Commercial broadcasting

commercialcommercial radiocommercial television
CBS (an initialism of the network's former name, the Columbia Broadcasting System) is an American English language commercial broadcast television and radio network that is a flagship property of CBS Corporation.
The best-known commercial broadcasters in the United States today are the ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC television networks and the RTEX radio network, based in the United States.

Network affiliate

affiliatedaffiliatemember
Prior to then, CBS Radio mainly provided news and features content for its portfolio owned-and-operated radio stations in large and mid-sized markets, and affiliated radio stations in various other markets.
One of the most notable and expansive affiliation changes occurred in the United States from September 1994 to September 1996, when television stations in 30 markets changed affiliations (through both direct swaps involving the new and original affiliates, and transactions involving multiple stations) as a result of a May 1994 agreement by New World Communications to switch twelve of its stations to Fox, resulting in various other affiliation transactions including additional groupwide deals (such as those between ABC and the E. W. Scripps Company, and CBS and Westinghouse Broadcasting).

CBS Columbia Square

Columbia StudiosColumbiaColumbia Square
In 1938, NBC and CBS each opened studios in Hollywood to attract the entertainment industry's top talent to their networks – NBC at Radio City on Sunset Boulevard and Vine Street, CBS two blocks away at Columbia Square.
CBS Columbia Square, located at 6121 Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, was the home of CBS's Los Angeles radio and television operations from 1938 until 2007.

The War of the Worlds (radio drama)

The War of the WorldsWar of the Worldsradio adaptation
On October 30, 1938, CBS gained a taste of infamy when The Mercury Theatre on the Air broadcast a radio adaptation of H. G. Wells's The War of the Worlds, performed by Orson Welles.
It was performed and broadcast live as a Halloween episode at 8 p.m. on Sunday, October 30, 1938 over the Columbia Broadcasting System radio network.

John Serry Sr.

John SerrySerry, John Sr.Serry, Sr.
It featured such popular radio broadcasts as Viva América which showcased leading musical talent from both North and South America including John Serry Sr., as accompanied by the CBS Pan American Orchestra under the musical direction of Alfredo Antonini.
He performed on the CBS Radio and Television networks and contributed to Voice of America's cultural diplomacy initiatives during the Golden Age of Radio.

CBS Corporation

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CBS (an initialism of the network's former name, the Columbia Broadcasting System) is an American English language commercial broadcast television and radio network that is a flagship property of CBS Corporation.
CBS, not Viacom, retains control of over-the-air television (CBS, CW) broadcasting, TV production and distribution, publishing, pay-cable, basic cable, and recording formerly owned by the larger company.

Arthur Godfrey

Arthur Godfrey TimeGodfreyThe Arthur Godfrey Show
A notable exception to this was relative newcomer Arthur Godfrey who, as late as 1942, was still doing a local morning show in Washington, D.C. Godfrey, who had been a cemetery-lot salesman and a cab driver, pioneered the style of talking directly to the listener as an individual, with a singular "you" rather than phrases like "Now, folks..."
At the peak of his success in the mid-1950s, Godfrey helmed two CBS-TV weekly series and a daily 90-minute television mid-morning show, but, by the early 1960s, his presence had been reduced to hosting the occasional TV special and his daily network radio show, which ended in 1972.

WCBS (AM)

WCBSWCBS-AMWABC
During Louchheim's brief regime, Columbia paid $410,000 to A.H. Grebe's Atlantic Broadcasting Company for a small Brooklyn station, WABC (no relation to the current WABC), which would become the network's flagship station.
In 1928, General Order 40 moved the station's frequency to 970, and the station became a part-time affiliate of the Columbia Broadcasting System, which was looking for a full-time radio presence in New York City (CBS's first flagship was WOR).

William L. Shirer

Shirer, William L.William ShirerShirer, William L
Murrow began assembling the staff of broadcast journalists – including William L. Shirer, Charles Collingwood, Bill Downs, and Eric Sevareid – who would become known as the "Murrow Boys".
Originally a foreign correspondent for the Chicago Tribune and the International News Service, Shirer was the first reporter hired by Edward R. Murrow for what would become a CBS radio team of journalists known as "Murrow's Boys".