CIO-PAC

C.I.O Political Action CommitteeCIO PAC
The first-ever "political action committee" in the United States of America was the Congress of Industrial Organizations - Political Action Committee or CIO-PAC (1943-1955).wikipedia
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Lee Pressman

Pressman
In his 1993 memoir, John Abt, general counsel for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America under Sidney Hillman, claimed the leaders of the Communist Party of the USA had inspired the idea of the CIO-PAC: In 1943, Gene Dennis came to me and Lee Pressman to first raise the idea of a political action committee to organize labor support for Roosevelt in the approaching 1944 election.
In July 1943, the CIO formed a political action committee, the "CIO-PAC," chaired by Sidney Hillman, and supported by Pressman and John Abt as co-counsels.

Congress of Industrial Organizations

CIOCommittee for Industrial OrganizationCommittee for Industrial Organizations
The first-ever "political action committee" in the United States of America was the Congress of Industrial Organizations - Political Action Committee or CIO-PAC (1943-1955). The 10,000 members of the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Employees Union (PRTEU), a labor union unaffiliated with either the American Federation of Labor or the Congress of Industrial Organizations, led a sick-out strike, now known as the Philadelphia transit strike of 1944, for six days.
In July 1943, the CIO formed the first-ever political action committee in the United States, the CIO-PAC, to help elected Roosevelt.

Sidney Hillman

HillmanHillman, SidneySidney Hillman Foundation
In his 1993 memoir, John Abt, general counsel for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America under Sidney Hillman, claimed the leaders of the Communist Party of the USA had inspired the idea of the CIO-PAC: In 1943, Gene Dennis came to me and Lee Pressman to first raise the idea of a political action committee to organize labor support for Roosevelt in the approaching 1944 election.
In July 1943, Philip Murray of the CIO led formation of the CIO-PAC, of which Hillan was the first head.

Calvin Benham Baldwin

C. B. BaldwinC.B. "Beanie" BaldwinCalvin Benham "Beanie" Baldwin
Calvin Benham Baldwin left government at that time to go work for the CIO-PAC.
In 1943, Baldwin left government to work with the Congress of Industrial Organizations's Political Action Committee (CIO-PAC).

Philip Murray

In November 1946, prior to passage of the Smith-Connally Act, the CIO's second president, Philip Murray appointed John Brophy (a UMW leader, by then head of the CIO's director of Industrial Union Councils), Nathan Cowan (CIO legislative director), and J. Raymond Walsh (CIO research director) to report on CIO political operations.
In July 1943, Murray had established a permanent political action committee (PAC) within the CIO–the CIO-PAC–the first-ever PAC in the United States.

John Brophy (labor)

John Brophy
In November 1946, prior to passage of the Smith-Connally Act, the CIO's second president, Philip Murray appointed John Brophy (a UMW leader, by then head of the CIO's director of Industrial Union Councils), Nathan Cowan (CIO legislative director), and J. Raymond Walsh (CIO research director) to report on CIO political operations.
In November-December 1942, he led a team whose report led to formation of the CIO-PAC in July 1943.

David J. McDonald

David McDonald
McDonald was appointed to the executive council of the CIO-PAC, controlling its policies, endorsements and donations alongside Jacob Potofsky of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, Emil Rieve of the Transport Workers Union of America and Emil Mazey of the United Auto Workers.

Political action committee

Super PACPACpolitical action committees
The first-ever "political action committee" in the United States of America was the Congress of Industrial Organizations - Political Action Committee or CIO-PAC (1943-1955).
The first PAC was the CIO-PAC, formed in July 1943 under CIO president Philip Murray and headed by Sidney Hillman.

Lucy Randolph Mason

After 1944, Lucy Randolph Mason worked with the CIO-PAC in the South, helping to register union members, black and white, and working for the elimination of the poll tax.
After 1944, Mason worked with the CIO Political Action Committee ("CIO-PAC") in the South, helping to register union members, black and white, and working for the elimination of the poll tax.

American Federation of Labor

AFLAmerican Federation of LabourA. F. of L.
What distinguished the CIO-PAC from previous political groups (including the AFL's political operations) was its "open, public operation, soliciting support from non-CIO unionists and from the progressive public... Moreover, CIO political operatives would actively participate in intraparty platform, policy, and candidate selection processes, pressing the broad agenda of the industrial union movement." The 10,000 members of the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Employees Union (PRTEU), a labor union unaffiliated with either the American Federation of Labor or the Congress of Industrial Organizations, led a sick-out strike, now known as the Philadelphia transit strike of 1944, for six days.

John Abt

John J. Abt
In his 1993 memoir, John Abt, general counsel for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America under Sidney Hillman, claimed the leaders of the Communist Party of the USA had inspired the idea of the CIO-PAC: In 1943, Gene Dennis came to me and Lee Pressman to first raise the idea of a political action committee to organize labor support for Roosevelt in the approaching 1944 election.

Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America

Amalgamated Clothing WorkersAmalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers UnionAmalgamated Clothing Workers Union
In his 1993 memoir, John Abt, general counsel for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America under Sidney Hillman, claimed the leaders of the Communist Party of the USA had inspired the idea of the CIO-PAC: In 1943, Gene Dennis came to me and Lee Pressman to first raise the idea of a political action committee to organize labor support for Roosevelt in the approaching 1944 election.

Communist Party USA

Communist PartyCommunistAmerican Communist Party
In his 1993 memoir, John Abt, general counsel for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America under Sidney Hillman, claimed the leaders of the Communist Party of the USA had inspired the idea of the CIO-PAC: In 1943, Gene Dennis came to me and Lee Pressman to first raise the idea of a political action committee to organize labor support for Roosevelt in the approaching 1944 election.

Eugene Dennis

Gene Dennis[Eugene] Dennis
In his 1993 memoir, John Abt, general counsel for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America under Sidney Hillman, claimed the leaders of the Communist Party of the USA had inspired the idea of the CIO-PAC: In 1943, Gene Dennis came to me and Lee Pressman to first raise the idea of a political action committee to organize labor support for Roosevelt in the approaching 1944 election.

Elizabeth Bentley

BentleyGolos network
Thus, in 1943, as American spy Elizabeth Bentley resurrected the Ware Group (of which Abt had been a member), could not risk involvement with her or the group.

Ware Group

Harold Ware spy ringWare spy ring
Thus, in 1943, as American spy Elizabeth Bentley resurrected the Ware Group (of which Abt had been a member), could not risk involvement with her or the group.

Victor Perlo

PERLOPerlo group
Instead, the group reformed under Victor Perlo as the Perlo Group.

Perlo group

PerloVictor Perlo
Instead, the group reformed under Victor Perlo as the Perlo Group.

Strike action

strikestrikeslabor strike
The legislation was hurriedly created after 400,000 coal miners, their wages significantly lowered because of high wartime inflation, struck for a $2-a-day wage increase. The 10,000 members of the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Employees Union (PRTEU), a labor union unaffiliated with either the American Federation of Labor or the Congress of Industrial Organizations, led a sick-out strike, now known as the Philadelphia transit strike of 1944, for six days.

Fair Employment Practice Committee

Fair Employment Practices CommissionFair Employment Practices CommitteeCommittee on Fair Employment Practice
The war powers bestowed by the Act were first used in August 1944 when the Fair Employment Practices Commission ordered the Philadelphia Transportation Company to hire African-Americans as motormen.

Philadelphia Transportation Company

Philadelphia Rapid Transit CompanyPhiladelphia Rapid TransitPTC
The war powers bestowed by the Act were first used in August 1944 when the Fair Employment Practices Commission ordered the Philadelphia Transportation Company to hire African-Americans as motormen.

African Americans

African AmericanAfrican-Americanblack
The war powers bestowed by the Act were first used in August 1944 when the Fair Employment Practices Commission ordered the Philadelphia Transportation Company to hire African-Americans as motormen.

Motorman (locomotive)

motormanmotormendriver
The war powers bestowed by the Act were first used in August 1944 when the Fair Employment Practices Commission ordered the Philadelphia Transportation Company to hire African-Americans as motormen.

Philadelphia transit strike of 1944

Philadelphia Transit Strike1944 transit strike1944, Philadelphia
The 10,000 members of the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Employees Union (PRTEU), a labor union unaffiliated with either the American Federation of Labor or the Congress of Industrial Organizations, led a sick-out strike, now known as the Philadelphia transit strike of 1944, for six days.

United States Army

U.S. ArmyUS ArmyArmy
President Roosevelt sent 8,000 United States Army troops to the city to seize and operate the transit system, and threatened to draft any PRTEU member who did not return to the job within 48 hours.