Cabbage

cabbageswhite cabbagegreen cabbageheaded cabbageLargest cabbage producerSavoy cabbageBlue-green cabbageBrassica oleracea var. capitataBrassica oleraceae capitataCabbage production
Cabbage or headed cabbage (comprising several cultivars of Brassica oleracea) is a leafy green, red (purple), or white (pale green) biennial plant grown as an annual vegetable crop for its dense-leaved heads.wikipedia
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Brussels sprout

Brussels sproutssproutssprout
botrytis); Brussels sprouts (var. oleracea'', including broccoli, collard greens, brussels sprouts, kohlrabi and sprouting broccoli.
The Brussels sprout is a member of the Gemmifera Group of cabbages (Brassica oleracea), grown for its edible buds.

Sauerkraut

Sour KroutChoucroutecrout
Cabbages are prepared many different ways for eating; they can be pickled, fermented (for dishes such as sauerkraut), steamed, stewed, sautéed, braised, or eaten raw. Sauerkraut was used by Dutch, Scandinavian and German sailors to prevent scurvy during long ship voyages.
Sauerkraut (, lit. "sour cabbage" ) is finely cut raw cabbage that has been fermented by various lactic acid bacteria.

Savoy cabbage

SavoyBrassica oleracea'' var. ''sabaudaBrassica rapa subsp. narinosa
gemmifera); and savoy cabbage (var.
Savoy cabbage is a winter vegetable and one of several cabbage varieties.

Cauliflower

Brassica oleracea botrytisBotrytis GroupBrassica oleracea var. botrytis
It is descended from the wild cabbage, B. oleracea var. oleracea, and belongs to the "cole crops" or brassicas, meaning it is closely related to broccoli and cauliflower (var.
Brassica oleracea also includes broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, collard greens, and kale, collectively called "cole" crops, though they are of different cultivar groups.

Brassica

brassicascole cropsmustard
The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) reported that world production of cabbage and other brassicas for 2014 was 71.8 million metric tonnes, with China accounting for 47% of the world total. acephala) is a member of the genus Brassica and the mustard family, Brassicaceae.
The members of the genus are informally known as cruciferous vegetables, cabbages, or mustard plants.

Collard (plant)

collard greenscollardscollard
oleracea'', including broccoli, collard greens, brussels sprouts, kohlrabi and sprouting broccoli.
Collard refers to certain loose-leafed cultivars of Brassica oleracea, the same species as many common vegetables, including cabbage (Capitata Group) and broccoli (Botrytis Group).

Brassica oleracea

wild cabbagecolewortB. oleracea
It is descended from the wild cabbage, B. oleracea var. oleracea, and belongs to the "cole crops" or brassicas, meaning it is closely related to broccoli and cauliflower (var. Cabbage or headed cabbage (comprising several cultivars of Brassica oleracea) is a leafy green, red (purple), or white (pale green) biennial plant grown as an annual vegetable crop for its dense-leaved heads.
Brassica oleracea is a plant species that includes many common foods as cultivars, including cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts, collard greens, savoy, kohlrabi, and gai lan.

Broccoli

Cauliflowers and Broccoli ProductionLargest cauliflowers and broccoli producerB-green
It is descended from the wild cabbage, B. oleracea var. oleracea, and belongs to the "cole crops" or brassicas, meaning it is closely related to broccoli and cauliflower (var. oleracea'', including broccoli, collard greens, brussels sprouts, kohlrabi and sprouting broccoli.
The word broccoli comes from the Italian plural of broccolo, which means "the flowering crest of a cabbage", and is the diminutive form of brocco, meaning "small nail" or "sprout".

Kohlrabi

Brassica var. caulorapaKnolkholKohl Rabi
oleracea'', including broccoli, collard greens, brussels sprouts, kohlrabi and sprouting broccoli.
It is the same species as cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts, collard greens, Savoy cabbage, and gai lan.

Brassicaceae

mustard familyCruciferaecrucifers
acephala) is a member of the genus Brassica and the mustard family, Brassicaceae.
The genus name comes from the Classical Latin word brassica, referring to cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables.

Vitamin C

ascorbic acidascorbateC
Cabbage is a good source of vitamin K, vitamin C and dietary fiber.

Epicuticular wax

bloomwaxleaf waxes
Most cabbages have thick, alternating leaves, with margins that range from wavy or lobed to highly dissected; some varieties have a waxy bloom on the leaves.
Paraffins occur in leaves of peas and cabbages, alkyl esters in leaves of carnauba palm and banana, the asymmetrical secondary alcohol 10-nonacosanol in most gymnosperms such as Ginkgo biloba and Sitka spruce, many of the Ranunculaceae, Papaveraceae and Rosaceae and some mosses, symmetrical secondary alcohols in Brassicaceae including Arabidopsis thaliana, primary alcohols (mostly octacosan-1-ol) in most grasses Poaceae, Eucalyptus and legumes among many other plant groups, β-diketones in many grasses, Eucalyptus, box Buxus and the Ericaceae, aldehydes in young beech leaves, sugarcane culms and lemon fruit and triterpenes in fruit waxes of apple, plum and grape Aromatic compounds have been recorded in epicuticular waxes but are generally minor constituents.

Biennial plant

biennialbiennialsbiennial plants
Cabbage or headed cabbage (comprising several cultivars of Brassica oleracea) is a leafy green, red (purple), or white (pale green) biennial plant grown as an annual vegetable crop for its dense-leaved heads.
Examples of biennial plants are members of the onion family including leek, some members of the cabbage family, common mullein, parsley, fennel, Lunaria, silverbeet, Black-eyed Susan, Sweet William, colic weed, carrot, and some hollyhocks.

Pickling

pickledpicklepickles
Cabbages are prepared many different ways for eating; they can be pickled, fermented (for dishes such as sauerkraut), steamed, stewed, sautéed, braised, or eaten raw.
Romanian pickles (murături) are made out of beetroot, cucumbers, green tomatoes (gogonele), carrots, cabbage, garlic, sauerkraut (bell peppers stuffed with cabbage), bell peppers, melons, mushrooms, turnips, celery and cauliflower.

Vitamin K

KMenaquinoneVitamin K 1
Cabbage is a good source of vitamin K, vitamin C and dietary fiber.
Vitamin K 1 is found chiefly in leafy green vegetables such as spinach, swiss chard, lettuce and Brassica vegetables (such as cabbage, kale, cauliflower, broccoli, and brussels sprouts) and often the absorption is greater when accompanied by fats such as butter or oils.

Cabbage roll

stuffed cabbagecabbage rollsGolubtsy
These include the heaviest cabbage, at 57.61 kg, heaviest red cabbage, at 19.05 kg, longest cabbage roll, at 15.37 m, and the largest cabbage dish, at 925.4 kg.
A cabbage roll is a dish consisting of cooked cabbage leaves wrapped around a variety of fillings.

Turnip

turnipsturnip greensDutch turnips
By early Roman times, Egyptian artisans and children were eating cabbage and turnips among a wide variety of other vegetables and pulses.
Similar to raw cabbage or radish, turnip leaves and roots have a pungent flavor that becomes milder after cooking.

Cultivar

cultivarscultivated varietyvariety
Cabbage or headed cabbage (comprising several cultivars of Brassica oleracea) is a leafy green, red (purple), or white (pale green) biennial plant grown as an annual vegetable crop for its dense-leaved heads.

Red cabbage

Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.purple cabbagePurple-red cabbage
The red cabbage (purple-leaved varieties of Brassica oleracea Capitata Group) is a kind of cabbage, also known as purple cabbage, red kraut, or blue kraut after preparation.

Scurvy

antiscorbuticvitamin C deficiencyascorbic acid deficiency
Sauerkraut was used by Dutch, Scandinavian and German sailors to prevent scurvy during long ship voyages.
It is also found in vegetables, such as brussels sprouts, cabbage, potatoes, and spinach.

Cabbage moth

Mamestra brassicae
The diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) and the cabbage moth (Mamestra brassicae) thrive in the higher summer temperatures of continental Europe, where they cause considerable damage to cabbage crops.
The common name, cabbage moth, is a misnomer as the species feeds on many fruits, vegetables, and crops in the genus Brassica (i.e. cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts).

Triangle of U

3 major ancestral genomesBrassica'' triangleoriginated
According to the triangle of U theory of the evolution and relationships between Brassica species, ''B.

Striped flea beetle

Phyllotreta striolataP. striolata
Pests include root-knot nematodes and cabbage maggots, which produce stunted and wilted plants with yellow leaves; aphids, which induce stunted plants with curled and yellow leaves; harlequin bugs, which cause white and yellow leaves; thrips, which lead to leaves with white-bronze spots; striped flea beetles, which riddle leaves with small holes; and caterpillars, which leave behind large, ragged holes in leaves.
It is a pest of cabbage and other brassicas.

Cabbage looper

Trichoplusia niCabbage looper mothcabbage looper moth ''Trichoplusia'' ''ni
The cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni) is infamous in North America for its voracious appetite and for producing frass that contaminates plants.
Cruciferous vegetables, such as cabbage, bok choy, and broccoli, are its main host plant; hence, the reference to cabbage in its common name.

Glucosinolate

glucosinolatesmustard oilmustard oils
The characteristic flavor of cabbage is caused by glucosinolates, a class of sulfur-containing glucosides.
Glucosinolates are natural components of many pungent plants such as mustard, cabbage, and horseradish.