Cable television

cablecable TVcable channelCATVbasic cablecable networkcable systemscable television networksatellite channelchannel
Cable television is a system of delivering television programming to consumers via radio frequency (RF) signals transmitted through coaxial cables, or in more recent systems, light pulses through fiber-optic cables.wikipedia
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Coaxial cable

coaxialcoax cablecable
Cable television is a system of delivering television programming to consumers via radio frequency (RF) signals transmitted through coaxial cables, or in more recent systems, light pulses through fiber-optic cables. In the most common system, multiple television channels (as many as 500, although this varies depending on the provider's available channel capacity) are distributed to subscriber residences through a coaxial cable, which comes from a trunkline supported on utility poles originating at the cable company's local distribution facility, called the "headend".
It is used in such applications as telephone trunklines, broadband internet networking cables, high speed computer data busses, carrying cable television signals, and connecting radio transmitters and receivers to their antennas.

Television

TVtelevisedtelevisions
Cable television is a system of delivering television programming to consumers via radio frequency (RF) signals transmitted through coaxial cables, or in more recent systems, light pulses through fiber-optic cables.
Alternatively television signals are distributed by coaxial cable or optical fiber, satellite systems and, since the 2000s via the Internet.

Satellite television

satellitedirect broadcast satellitesatellite TV
This contrasts with broadcast television (also known as terrestrial television), in which the television signal is transmitted over the air by radio waves and received by a television antenna attached to the television; or satellite television, in which the television signal is transmitted by a communications satellite orbiting the Earth and received by a satellite dish on the roof. When available through satellite television, including direct broadcast satellite providers such as DirecTV, Dish Network and Sky, as well as via IPTV providers such as Verizon FIOS and AT&T U-verse is referred to as a "satellite channel".
It is usually the only television available in many remote geographic areas without terrestrial television or cable television service.

Terrestrial television

Broadcastover-the-airterrestrial
This contrasts with broadcast television (also known as terrestrial television), in which the television signal is transmitted over the air by radio waves and received by a television antenna attached to the television; or satellite television, in which the television signal is transmitted by a communications satellite orbiting the Earth and received by a satellite dish on the roof.
The term "terrestrial" is used to distinguish this type from the newer technologies of satellite television (direct broadcast satellite or DBS television), in which the television signal is transmitted to the receiver from an overhead satellite, cable television, in which the signal is carried to the receiver through a cable, and Internet Protocol television, in which the signal is received over an Internet stream or on a network utilizing the Internet Protocol.

Digital cable

digitaldigital cable televisioncable
Analog television was standard in the 20th century, but since the 2000s, cable systems have been upgraded to digital cable operation. There are two standards for cable television; older analog cable, and newer digital cable which can carry data signals used by digital television receivers such as HDTV equipment.
Digital cable is the distribution of cable television using digital video compression for distribution.

Analog television

analoganalogueanalogue television
Analog television was standard in the 20th century, but since the 2000s, cable systems have been upgraded to digital cable operation.
Analog television may be wireless (terrestrial television and satellite television) or can be distributed over a cable network using cable converters (cable television).

DirecTV

Direct TVDirectTVDirecTV Sports
When available through satellite television, including direct broadcast satellite providers such as DirecTV, Dish Network and Sky, as well as via IPTV providers such as Verizon FIOS and AT&T U-verse is referred to as a "satellite channel".
Its primary competitors are Dish Network and cable television providers.

HBO

Home Box OfficeHBO.comHBO Family
Examples of cable/satellite channels/cable networks available in many countries are HBO, Cinemax, MTV, Cartoon Network, AXN, E!, FX, Discovery Channel, Canal+, Eurosport, Fox Sports, Disney Channel, Nickelodeon, CNN International, and ESPN.
HBO (Home Box Office) is an American premium cable and satellite television network owned by Home Box Office, Inc., a subsidiary of WarnerMedia Entertainment.

Dish Network

DishDish Network CorporationDISH Latino
When available through satellite television, including direct broadcast satellite providers such as DirecTV, Dish Network and Sky, as well as via IPTV providers such as Verizon FIOS and AT&T U-verse is referred to as a "satellite channel".
Its primary competitors are AT&T's satellite service known as DirecTV and cable television providers.

Cinemax

Cinemax 2Cinemax After DarkCinemax HD
Examples of cable/satellite channels/cable networks available in many countries are HBO, Cinemax, MTV, Cartoon Network, AXN, E!, FX, Discovery Channel, Canal+, Eurosport, Fox Sports, Disney Channel, Nickelodeon, CNN International, and ESPN.
Cinemax is an American premium cable and satellite television network owned by Home Box Office, Inc. Cinemax primarily broadcasts theatrically released feature films, along with original series, documentaries and special behind-the-scenes features.

E!

E! OnlineE! Entertainment TelevisionE! Entertainment
Examples of cable/satellite channels/cable networks available in many countries are HBO, Cinemax, MTV, Cartoon Network, AXN, E!, FX, Discovery Channel, Canal+, Eurosport, Fox Sports, Disney Channel, Nickelodeon, CNN International, and ESPN.
E! (an initialism for Entertainment Television) is an American basic cable channel owned by the NBCUniversal Cable Entertainment Group division of NBCUniversal, a subsidiary of Comcast.

Cartoon Network

Cartoon Network VideoCartoon Network GamesThe Cartoon Network
Examples of cable/satellite channels/cable networks available in many countries are HBO, Cinemax, MTV, Cartoon Network, AXN, E!, FX, Discovery Channel, Canal+, Eurosport, Fox Sports, Disney Channel, Nickelodeon, CNN International, and ESPN.
Cartoon Network was not the first cable channel to have relied on cartoons to attract an audience; however, it was the first 24-hour single-genre channel with animation as its main theme.

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon ProductionsNickNick Radio
Examples of cable/satellite channels/cable networks available in many countries are HBO, Cinemax, MTV, Cartoon Network, AXN, E!, FX, Discovery Channel, Canal+, Eurosport, Fox Sports, Disney Channel, Nickelodeon, CNN International, and ESPN.
Pinwheel was at the time only available on QUBE, which was the first two-way major market interactive cable television system, owned by Warner Cable.

High-definition television

HDTVhigh definitionHD
There are two standards for cable television; older analog cable, and newer digital cable which can carry data signals used by digital television receivers such as HDTV equipment.
HDTV is the current standard video format used in most broadcasts: terrestrial broadcast television, cable television, satellite television, Blu-rays, and streaming video.

Satellite dish

satellite dishesdishsatellite antenna
This contrasts with broadcast television (also known as terrestrial television), in which the television signal is transmitted over the air by radio waves and received by a television antenna attached to the television; or satellite television, in which the television signal is transmitted by a communications satellite orbiting the Earth and received by a satellite dish on the roof.
Lower frequencies are allocated to cable and terrestrial TV, FM radio, etc.

Set-top box

set top boxset-top boxesSTB
Most cable companies require a set-top box or a slot on one's TV set for conditional access module cards to view their cable channels, even on newer televisions with digital cable QAM tuners, because most digital cable channels are now encrypted, or "scrambled", to reduce cable service theft.
They are used in cable television, satellite television, and over-the-air television systems, as well as other uses.

F connector

F-connectorsFF type
The standard cable used in the U.S. is RG-6, which has a 75 ohm impedance, and connects with a type F connector.
The F connector (also F-type connector) is a coaxial RF connector commonly used for "over the air" terrestrial television, cable television and universally for satellite television and cable modems, usually with RG-6/U cable or, in older installations, with RG-59/U cable.

Cable television piracy

cable theftillegal cablecable service theft
Most cable companies require a set-top box or a slot on one's TV set for conditional access module cards to view their cable channels, even on newer televisions with digital cable QAM tuners, because most digital cable channels are now encrypted, or "scrambled", to reduce cable service theft.
Cable television piracy, a form of copyright infringement, is the act of obtaining unauthorized access to cable television services.

QAM (television)

QAM tunerQAMClear QAM
Most cable companies require a set-top box or a slot on one's TV set for conditional access module cards to view their cable channels, even on newer televisions with digital cable QAM tuners, because most digital cable channels are now encrypted, or "scrambled", to reduce cable service theft.
It is the format by which digital cable channels are encoded and transmitted via cable television providers.

Digital video recorder

DVRpersonal video recorderPVR
The cable company will provide set top boxes based on the level of service a customer purchases, from basic set top boxes with a standard definition picture connected through the standard coaxial connection on the TV, to high-definition wireless DVR receivers connected via HDMI or component.
As consumers have been able to converge increasing amounts of video content on their set-tops, delivered by traditional 'broadcast' cable, satellite and terrestrial as well as IP networks, the ability to capture programming and view it whenever they want has become a must-have function for many consumers.

Cable television headend

headendheadendscable headend
In the most common system, multiple television channels (as many as 500, although this varies depending on the provider's available channel capacity) are distributed to subscriber residences through a coaxial cable, which comes from a trunkline supported on utility poles originating at the cable company's local distribution facility, called the "headend".
A cable television headend is a master facility for receiving television signals for processing and distribution over a cable television system.

Cable box (outside)

cable boxcable distribution boxoutdoor cable box
At an outdoor cable box on the subscriber's residence the company's service drop cable is connected to cables distributing the signal to different rooms in the building.
A cable box is a metal enclosure (found in the vicinity of a house that has cable service) that connects a house or building to the cable provider.

Pay-per-view

pay per viewPPViPPV
There are also usually "upstream" channels on the cable to send data from the customer box to the cable headend, for advanced features such as requesting pay-per-view shows or movies, cable internet access, and cable telephone service.
One of the earliest pay-per-view systems on cable television, the Optical Systems-developed Channel 100, first began service in 1972 in San Diego, California through Mission Cable (which was later acquired by Cox Communications) and TheaterVisioN, which operated out of Sarasota, Florida.

Frequency-division multiplexing

frequency division multiplexingFDMfrequency division multiplex
Many channels can be transmitted through one coaxial cable by a technique called frequency division multiplexing.
Another example is cable television, in which many television channels are carried simultaneously on a single cable.

RG-6

RG-6URG6RG-6/U cable
The standard cable used in the U.S. is RG-6, which has a 75 ohm impedance, and connects with a type F connector.
A common type of 75 ohm coaxial cable is cable television (CATV) distribution coax, used to route cable television signals to and within homes.