Caesar (Mercury Theatre)

CaesarJulius CaesarCaesar'' (Mercury Theatre)1937 stage versiongroundbreaking adaptationgroundbreaking stage adaptationstage triumphThe Tragedy of Julius Caesar
Caesar is the title of Orson Welles's innovative 1937 adaptation of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, a modern-dress bare-stage production that evoked comparison to contemporary Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany.wikipedia
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Orson Welles

WellesWellesianWelles, Orson
Caesar is the title of Orson Welles's innovative 1937 adaptation of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, a modern-dress bare-stage production that evoked comparison to contemporary Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany.
He is remembered for his innovative work in all three: in theatre, most notably Caesar (1937), a Broadway adaptation of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar; in radio, the long-remembered 1938 broadcast "The War of the Worlds"; and in film, Citizen Kane (1941), consistently ranked as one of the greatest films ever made.

Joseph Cotten

Cotten, JosephJoe CottenJoseph Cheshire (Cotten)
The original company included such actors as Joseph Cotten, George Coulouris, Geraldine Fitzgerald, Ruth Ford, Arlene Francis, Martin Gabel, John Hoysradt, Whitford Kane, Norman Lloyd, Vincent Price, Erskine Sanford, Stefan Schnabel and Hiram Sherman.
In 1937, Cotten became an inaugural member of Welles's Mercury Theatre company, starring in its Broadway productions Caesar as Publius; it ran for 157 performances.

George Coulouris

The original company included such actors as Joseph Cotten, George Coulouris, Geraldine Fitzgerald, Ruth Ford, Arlene Francis, Martin Gabel, John Hoysradt, Whitford Kane, Norman Lloyd, Vincent Price, Erskine Sanford, Stefan Schnabel and Hiram Sherman.
Welles invited Coulouris to become a charter member of his Mercury Theatre, and in 1937 Coulouris performed the role of Mark Antony in the company's debut production, Caesar, an innovative modern-dress production of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar.

John Hoyt

John HoysradtJohn Hoystradt
The original company included such actors as Joseph Cotten, George Coulouris, Geraldine Fitzgerald, Ruth Ford, Arlene Francis, Martin Gabel, John Hoysradt, Whitford Kane, Norman Lloyd, Vincent Price, Erskine Sanford, Stefan Schnabel and Hiram Sherman.
In that period he was cast in a broad range of plays, such as Valley Forge (1934), Ziegfeld Follies of 1936 (1935), The Masque of Kings (1936), Storm Over Patsy (1936) and Caesar (1937).

Norman Lloyd

The original company included such actors as Joseph Cotten, George Coulouris, Geraldine Fitzgerald, Ruth Ford, Arlene Francis, Martin Gabel, John Hoysradt, Whitford Kane, Norman Lloyd, Vincent Price, Erskine Sanford, Stefan Schnabel and Hiram Sherman.
He played a memorable role in its first stage production, Caesar (1937), Welles's modern-dress adaptation of Shakespeare's tragedy Julius Caesar — streamlined into an anti-fascist tour- de-force.

Julius Caesar (play)

Julius CaesarJulius CaeserJulius Cæsar
Caesar is the title of Orson Welles's innovative 1937 adaptation of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, a modern-dress bare-stage production that evoked comparison to contemporary Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany.
1937: Caesar, Orson Welles's famous Mercury Theatre production, drew fevered comment as the director dressed his protagonists in uniforms reminiscent of those common at the time in Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany, drawing a specific analogy between Caesar and Fascist Italian leader Benito Mussolini. Time magazine gave the production a rave review, together with the New York critics. The fulcrum of the show was the slaughter of Cinna the Poet (Norman Lloyd), a scene that literally stopped the show. Caesar opened at the Mercury Theatre in New York City in November 1937 and moved to the larger National Theater in January 1938, running a total of 157 performances. A second company made a five-month national tour with Caesar in 1938, again to critical acclaim.

Martin Gabel

The original company included such actors as Joseph Cotten, George Coulouris, Geraldine Fitzgerald, Ruth Ford, Arlene Francis, Martin Gabel, John Hoysradt, Whitford Kane, Norman Lloyd, Vincent Price, Erskine Sanford, Stefan Schnabel and Hiram Sherman.
On the stage Gabel portrayed Cassius in Caesar (1937), a critically acclaimed modern-dress adaptation of Shakespeare's tragedy streamlined into an anti-fascist tour de force, and starred as Danton in Danton's Death (1938).

Me and Orson Welles

2008 film adaptation
The incident is fictionalized in Robert Kaplow's novel Me and Orson Welles (2003) and its 2008 film adaptation.
Based on Robert Kaplow's novel of the same name, the story, set in 1937 New York, tells of a teenager hired to perform in Orson Welles's groundbreaking stage adaptation of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar.

Hiram Sherman

The original company included such actors as Joseph Cotten, George Coulouris, Geraldine Fitzgerald, Ruth Ford, Arlene Francis, Martin Gabel, John Hoysradt, Whitford Kane, Norman Lloyd, Vincent Price, Erskine Sanford, Stefan Schnabel and Hiram Sherman. Hiram Sherman as Casca
Additional theatre credits include the inaugural Mercury Theatre productions Caesar and The Shoemaker's Holiday, Very Warm for May, Cyrano de Bergerac, Boyd's Daughter (which he also directed) and Mary, Mary.

Nederlander Theatre

National TheatreBilly Rose TheatreNational Theater
The production moved from the Mercury Theatre to the larger National Theatre on January 24, 1938.
The venue has hosted a wide variety of shows, including the Mercury Theatre production of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Edmond Rostand's Cyrano de Bergerac, Noël Coward's Private Lives, Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and the Tony award-winning Rent.

Mercury Theatre

Mercury PlayersMercury ProductionMercury Productions
Considered Welles's highest achievement in the theatre, it premiered November 11, 1937, as the first production of the Mercury Theatre, an independent repertory theatre company that presented an acclaimed series of productions on Broadway through 1941.

Arthur Anderson (actor)

Arthur AndersonAnderson, Arthur
Arthur Anderson, who played the role of young Lucius, found himself bored and lonely in his third-floor dressing room at the National Theatre.
Anderson appeared in Orson Welles's Mercury Theatre production of Caesar on Broadway, as portrayed as the character Richard Samuels in the 2008 film Me and Orson Welles.

Tom Powers

Tom Powers, a leading actor with the Theatre Guild and a principal in the original production of Strange Interlude, led the company as Brutus.
He succeeded Orson Welles in the role of Brutus in the Mercury Theatre's debut production, Caesar.

Helvius Cinna

CinnaCinna the PoetGaius Helvius Cinna
"He staged it like a political melodrama that happened the night before," said Norman Lloyd, who played the role of Cinna the Poet.
* Cinna the Poet (1959), a painting by Jacob Landau that was inspired by the Mercury Theatre's modern-dress production of Caesar (1937), is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art.

Vincent J. Donehue

Vincent Donehue
Also in the cast were Lawrence Fletcher (Caesar), Vincent Donehue (Cinna the Poet), Herbert Ranson (Cassius, later played by Morgan Farley), Edmond O'Brien (Marc Antony), Edgar Barrier (Casca), Helen Craig (Calpurnia), Muriel Brassler (Portia) and a supporting ensemble of 60.
His early theatre credits include playing the role of Cinna the Poet in the Mercury Theatre's 1938 touring production of Caesar.

Servilius Casca

CascaPublius Servilius Casca Longushist
Hiram Sherman as Casca
In the 1937–38 Mercury Theatre stage production Caesar, Publius was played by Joseph Cotten.

Marc Blitzstein

BlitzsteinMark Blitzstein
Music was by Marc Blitzstein; sets were by Samuel Leve; the production manager and lighting designer was Jean Rosenthal.
Caesar (1937) — play revival — incidental music composer

Columbia Masterworks Records

Columbia MasterworksCBS MasterworksColumbia
In March 1938, members of the original cast recorded highlights from Caesar for Columbia Masterworks Records.
One of the first spoken word albums of historical significance was the Masterworks release of ten scenes from the Mercury Theatre's Broadway production of Caesar (Columbia Masterworks Set No. 325), recorded in March 1938 and released in 1939.

Alice Frost

At the National Theatre, Polly Rowles took the role of Calpurnia and Alice Frost played Portia.
She appeared on Broadway in Green Grow the Lilacs (1931), The Great Lover (1932), As Husbands Go (1933), It's a Wise Child (1933), the Mercury Theatre productions Caesar (1937–38) and The Shoemaker's Holiday (1938), A Roomful of Roses (1955), and The Bad Seed (1955).

Comedy Theatre (New York City)

Mercury TheatreComedy TheatreComedy Theater
Shuttered in the wake of the Depression, it reopened in 1937 as the Mercury Theatre — the venue for Orson Welles's groundbreaking adaptation of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and other productions for the Mercury Theatre repertory company.

The Mercury Theatre on the Air

Mercury Theatre on the AirMercury TheatreFirst Person Singular
* "Caesar" (September 11, 1938) on The Mercury Theatre on the Air, with Orson Welles, H. V. Kaltenborn (Commentator), Martin Gabel, George Coulouris and Joseph Holland (Indiana University Bloomington)

William Shakespeare

ShakespeareShakespeareanShakespearian
Caesar is the title of Orson Welles's innovative 1937 adaptation of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, a modern-dress bare-stage production that evoked comparison to contemporary Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany.

Fascism

fascistfascistsfascistic
Caesar is the title of Orson Welles's innovative 1937 adaptation of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, a modern-dress bare-stage production that evoked comparison to contemporary Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany.

Nazi Germany

GermanGermanyNazi
Caesar is the title of Orson Welles's innovative 1937 adaptation of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, a modern-dress bare-stage production that evoked comparison to contemporary Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany.

Repertory theatre

repertorystock theaterstock company
Considered Welles's highest achievement in the theatre, it premiered November 11, 1937, as the first production of the Mercury Theatre, an independent repertory theatre company that presented an acclaimed series of productions on Broadway through 1941.