Calvinism

Statues of William Farel, John Calvin, Theodore Beza, and John Knox at the centre of the International Monument to the Reformation in Geneva, Switzerland. They were among the most influential theologians that helped develop the Reformed tradition.
Calvin preached at St. Pierre Cathedral in Geneva
Cover of Calvin's magnum opus: Institutes of the Christian Religion
Early Calvinism was known for simple, unadorned churches, as shown in this 1661 painting of the interior of the Oude Kerk, Amsterdam
Abandoned Calvinist church in Łapczyna Wola, Poland
Calvinist church in Semarang, Indonesia.
The seal of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, an early American Presbyterian church
Fall of Man by Jacob Jordaens
The "Shield of the Trinity" diagrams the classic doctrine of the Trinity
This Dutch stained glass allegory shows Christ ascending the cross with Satan and several dead people on his back. Faith is personified as a woman to the right of a naked man on the ground asking Christ the way of salvation.
The Return of the Prodigal Son by Rembrandt, based on the Parable of the Prodigal Son illustrating forgiveness
John Calvin on his deathbed with church members
The Bay Psalm Book was used by the Pilgrims.
Moïse Amyraut formulated Amyraldism, a modified Calvinist theology regarding the nature of Christ's atonement.
Dutch prime minister Abraham Kuyper initiated neo-Calvinism
Stephen Bocskay, leader of Hungarian Calvinists in anti-Habsburg rebellion and first Calvinist prince of Transylvania ((r. 1605 – 1606))
Reformed church in Koudekerk aan den Rijn (Netherlands), 19th century
The burning of the Guernsey Martyrs during the Marian persecutions in 1556
The Grote Kerk in Haarlem, Dutch Republic, c. 1665

Major branch of Protestantism that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice set down by John Calvin and other Reformation-era theologians.

- Calvinism
Statues of William Farel, John Calvin, Theodore Beza, and John Knox at the centre of the International Monument to the Reformation in Geneva, Switzerland. They were among the most influential theologians that helped develop the Reformed tradition.

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This painting depicts baptism by affusion. The artist may have chosen an archaic form for this depiction of baptism by St. Peter.

Baptism

Christian sacrament of admission and adoption, almost invariably with the use of water, into Christianity.

Christian sacrament of admission and adoption, almost invariably with the use of water, into Christianity.

This painting depicts baptism by affusion. The artist may have chosen an archaic form for this depiction of baptism by St. Peter.
Catacombs of San Callisto: baptism in a 3rd-century painting
Al-Maghtas ruins on the Jordanian side of the Jordan River are the location for the Baptism of Jesus and the ministry of John the Baptist.
Excavated mikveh in Qumran, Israel
Christening photograph in Orthodox Church. The moment of Catechism.
Baptism by submersion in the Eastern Orthodox Church (Sophia Cathedral, 2005)
Men lined up to be baptized by immersion in the River Jordan
Baptism of a child by affusion
Fresco of a baptism from the Catacombs of Marcellinus and Peter.
Long laced gown worn at a typical Lutheran baptism in Sweden in 1948
Baptism of Augustine of Hippo as represented in a sculptural group in Troyes cathedral (1549)
The baptistry at St. Raphael's Cathedral, Dubuque, Iowa. This particular font was expanded in 2005 to include a small pool to provide for immersion baptism of adults. Eight-sided font architectures are common symbology of the day of Christ's Resurrection: the "Eighth Day".
Baptism Jar, used in Portuguese Ceylon.
Russian Orthodox priest greeting an infant and its godparents on the steps of the church at the beginning of the Sacred Mystery of Baptism.
A river baptism in North Carolina at the turn of the 20th century. Full-immersion (submersion) baptism continues to be a common practice in many African-American Christian congregations today.
Engraving from William G. Brownlow's book The Great Iron Wheel Examined, showing a Baptist minister changing clothes in front of horrified women after administering a baptism by immersion.
A baptistry in a Methodist church
Syro-Malabar Major Archbishop crowning a baby after baptism
An Orthodox baptism
A Mormon baptism, circa the 1850s
Christening of USS Dewey (DDG-105)
Mandaeans undergoing baptism (masbuta) in the Karun River, Ahvaz, Iran
Baptism of a Yazidi child in Lalish

Reformed and Methodist Protestants maintain a link between baptism and regeneration, but insist that it is not automatic or mechanical, and that regeneration may occur at a different time than baptism.

St. Peter's Basilica, the largest Catholic church in the world

Catholic Church

Largest Christian church, with 1.3 billion baptised Catholics worldwide.

Largest Christian church, with 1.3 billion baptised Catholics worldwide.

St. Peter's Basilica, the largest Catholic church in the world
The first use of the term "Catholic Church" (literally meaning "universal church") was by the church father Saint Ignatius of Antioch in his Letter to the Smyrnaeans (c. 110 AD). Ignatius of Antioch is also attributed the earliest recorded use of the term "Christianity" (Χριστιανισμός) c. 100 AD. He died in Rome, with his relics located in the Basilica of San Clemente al Laterano.
This fresco (1481–82) by Pietro Perugino in the Sistine Chapel shows Jesus giving the keys of heaven to Saint Peter.
The Last Supper, a late 1490s mural painting by Leonardo da Vinci, depicting the last supper of Jesus and his twelve apostles on the eve of his crucifixion. Most apostles are buried in Rome, including Saint Peter.
Jesus' commission to Saint Peter
19th-century drawing by Henry William Brewer of Old Saint Peter's Basilica, originally built in 318 by Emperor Constantine
Chartres Cathedral, completed 1220
The Renaissance period was a golden age for Catholic art. Pictured: the Sistine Chapel ceiling painted by Michelangelo
Ruins of the Jesuit Reduction at São Miguel das Missões in Brazil
While, since the 1960s, Pope Pius XII has been accused of not having done enough to shelter Jews from the Holocaust, his defenders claim he secretly encouraged individual Catholic resistance groups, such as that led by priest Heinrich Maier. Maier helped the allies fight against the V-2, which was produced by concentration camp prisoners.
Members of the Canadian Royal 22e Regiment in audience with Pope Pius XII, following the Liberation of Rome in 1944 during World War II
Bishops listen during the Second Vatican Council
Pope John Paul II was credited as a major influence to the end of the Cold War and the fall of communism. Here with U.S. President Ronald Reagan and his wife, Nancy, in 1982.
Francis is the 266th and current pope of the Catholic Church, a title he holds ex officio as bishop of Rome, and sovereign of Vatican City. He was elected in the 2013 papal conclave.
C. 1210 manuscript version of the traditional Shield of the Trinity theological diagram
The Blessed Virgin Mary is highly regarded in the Catholic Church, proclaiming her as Mother of God, free from original sin and an intercessor.
Mass at the Grotto at Lourdes, France. The chalice is displayed to the people immediately after the consecration of the wine.
Baptism of Augustine of Hippo as represented in a sculptural group in Troyes Cathedral (1549), France
Pope Benedict XVI celebrates the Eucharist at the canonisation of Frei Galvão in São Paulo, Brazil on 11 May 2007
A Catholic believer prays in a church in Mexico
The Seven Sacraments Altarpiece triptych painting of Extreme Unction (Anointing of the Sick) with oil being administered by a priest during last rites. Rogier van der Weyden, c. 1445.
Priests lay their hands on the ordinands during the rite of ordination.
Wedding mass in the Philippines
Catholic religious objects – Holy Bible, crucifix and rosary
East Syrian Rite wedding crowning celebrated by a bishop of the Syro-Malabar Catholic Church in India, one of the 23 Eastern Catholic Churches in full communion with the pope and the Catholic Church.
Saint Teresa of Calcutta advocated for the sick, the poor and the needy by practicing the acts of corporal works of mercy.
Allegory of chastity by Hans Memling
Pope Paul VI issued Humanae vitae on 25 July 1968.

In France, a series of conflicts termed the French Wars of Religion was fought from 1562 to 1598 between the Huguenots (French Calvinists) and the forces of the French Catholic League, which were backed and funded by a series of popes.

An Eastern Christian icon depicting Emperor Constantine and the Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea (325) as holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.

Christianity

Abrahamic monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.

Abrahamic monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.

An Eastern Christian icon depicting Emperor Constantine and the Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea (325) as holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.
Various depictions of Jesus
Crucifixion, representing the death of Jesus on the Cross, painting by Diego Velázquez, c. 1632.
The Law and the Gospel by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1529); Moses and Elijah point the sinner to Jesus for salvation.
The Trinity is the belief that God is one God in three persons: the Father, the Son (Jesus), and the Holy Spirit.
Midnight Mass at a Catholic parish church in Woodside, New York City, U.S.
Show on the life of Jesus at Igreja da Cidade in São José dos Campos, affiliated to the Brazilian Baptist Convention.
An early circular ichthys symbol, created by combining the Greek letters ΙΧΘΥΣ into a wheel, Ephesus, Asia Minor.
The Bible is the sacred book in Christianity.
St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican City, the largest church in the world and a symbol of the Catholic Church.
The 7th-century Khor Virap monastery in the shadow of Mount Ararat; Armenia was the first state to adopt Christianity as the state religion, in AD 301.
The Monastery of St. Matthew, located atop Mount Alfaf in northern Iraq, is recognized as one of the oldest Christian monasteries in existence.
Kadisha Valley, Lebanon, home to some of the earliest Christian monasteries in the world.
Christendom by A.D. 600 after its spread to Africa and Europe from the Middle East.
An example of Byzantine pictorial art, the Deësis mosaic at the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople.
Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont, where he preached the First Crusade. Illustration by Jean Colombe from a copy of the Passages d'outremer, c. 1490.
Martin Luther initiated the Reformation with his Ninety-five Theses in 1517.
Michelangelo's 1498–99 Pietà in St. Peter's Basilica; the Catholic Church was among the patronages of the Renaissance.
A depiction of Madonna and Child in a 19th-century Kakure Kirishitan Japanese woodcut.
A Christian procession in Brazil, the country with the largest Catholic population in the world.
Trinity Sunday in Russia; the Russian Orthodox Church has experienced a great revival since the fall of communism.
The global distribution of Christians: Countries colored a darker shade have a higher proportion of Christians.
Pope Francis, the current leader of the Catholic Church.
St. George's Cathedral in Istanbul: It has been the seat of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople whose leader is regarded as the primus inter pares in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
Holy Trinity Cathedral in Addis Ababa, the seat of the Ethiopian Orthodox.
A 6th-century Nestorian church, St. John the Arab, in the Assyrian village of Geramon in Hakkari, southeastern Turkey.
Saint Mary Church; an ancient Assyrian church located in the city of Urmia, Iran.
A 19th-century drawing of Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery receiving the Aaronic priesthood from John the Baptist. Latter Day Saints believe that the Priesthood ceased to exist after the death of the apostles and therefore needed to be restored.
Unitarian Church of Transylvania in Cluj-Napoca.
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A copy of the Summa Theologica by Thomas Aquinas, a famous Christian apologetic work.
Christians fleeing their homes in the Ottoman Empire, circa 1922. Many Christians were persecuted and/or killed during the Armenian genocide, Greek genocide, and Assyrian genocide.
Countries with 50% or more Christians are colored purple; countries with 10% to 50% Christians are colored pink
Nations with Christianity as their state religion are in blue
Distribution of Catholics
Distribution of Protestants
Distribution of Eastern Orthodox
Distribution of Oriental Orthodox
Distribution of other Christians
Links between interdenominational movements and other developments within Protestantism
Historical chart of the main Protestant branches

Calvinism and its varieties, such as Presbyterianism, were introduced in Scotland, the Netherlands, Hungary, Switzerland, and France.

Gallery of famous 17th-century Puritan theologians: Thomas Gouge, William Bridge, Thomas Manton, John Flavel, Richard Sibbes, Stephen Charnock, William Bates, John Owen, John Howe and Richard Baxter

Puritans

The Puritans were English Protestants in the 16th and 17th centuries who sought to purify the Church of England of Roman Catholic practices, maintaining that the Church of England had not been fully reformed and should become more Protestant.

The Puritans were English Protestants in the 16th and 17th centuries who sought to purify the Church of England of Roman Catholic practices, maintaining that the Church of England had not been fully reformed and should become more Protestant.

Gallery of famous 17th-century Puritan theologians: Thomas Gouge, William Bridge, Thomas Manton, John Flavel, Richard Sibbes, Stephen Charnock, William Bates, John Owen, John Howe and Richard Baxter
The Westminster Assembly, which saw disputes on Church polity in England (Victorian history painting by John Rogers Herbert).
Interior of the Old Ship Church, a Puritan meetinghouse in Hingham, Massachusetts. Puritans were Calvinists, so their churches were unadorned and plain.
Death's head, Granary Burial Ground. A typical example of early Funerary art in Puritan New England
Polemical popular print with a Catalogue of Sects, 1647.
The Snake in the Grass or Satan Transform'd to an Angel of Light, title page engraved by Richard Gaywood, ca. 1660
Pilgrims Going to Church by George Henry Boughton (1867)
Cotton Mather, influential New England Puritan minister, portrait by Peter Pelham
1659 public notice in Boston deeming Christmas illegal
Quaker Mary Dyer led to execution on Boston Common, 1 June 1660, by an unknown 19th century artist
Second version of The Puritan, a late 19th-century sculpture by Augustus Saint-Gaudens
Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland

Puritans adopted a Reformed theology and, in that sense, were Calvinists (as were many of their earlier opponents).

Martin Luther (1529) by Lucas Cranach the Elder

Martin Luther

German priest, theologian, author and hymnwriter.

German priest, theologian, author and hymnwriter.

Martin Luther (1529) by Lucas Cranach the Elder
Portraits of Hans and Margarethe Luther by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1527
Former monks' dormitory, St Augustine's Monastery, Erfurt
Luther as a friar, with tonsure
Luther's accommodation in Wittenberg
A posthumous portrait of Luther as an Augustinian friar
Luther's theses are engraved into the door of All Saints' Church, Wittenberg. The Latin inscription above informs the reader that the original door was destroyed by a fire, and that in 1857, King Frederick William IV of Prussia ordered a replacement be made.
The Catholic sale of indulgences shown in A Question to a Mintmaker, woodcut by Jörg Breu the Elder of Augsburg, c. 1530
Luther at Erfurt, which depicts Martin Luther discovering the doctrine of sola fide (by faith alone). Painting by Joseph Noel Paton, 1861.
Pope Leo X's Bull against the errors of Martin Luther, 1521, commonly known as Exsurge Domine
The meeting of Martin Luther (right) and Cardinal Cajetan (left, holding the book)
Luther Before the Diet of Worms by Anton von Werner (1843–1915)
Luther Monument in Worms. His statue is surrounded by the figures of his lay protectors and earlier Church reformers including John Wycliffe, Jan Hus and Girolamo Savonarola.
Wartburg Castle, Eisenach
The Wartburg room where Luther translated the New Testament into German. An original first edition is kept in the case on the desk.
Luther disguised as "Junker Jörg", 1521
Lutherhaus, Luther's residence in Wittenberg
The Twelve Articles, 1525
Katharina von Bora, Luther's wife, by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1526
Martin Luther at his desk with family portraits (17th century)
Church orders, Mecklenburg 1650
Lutheran church liturgy and sacraments
A stained glass portrayal of Luther
Luther's 1534 Bible
An early printing of Luther's hymn "Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott"
Luther on the left with Lazarus being raised by Jesus from the dead, painting by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1558
Statue of Martin Luther outside St. Mary's Church, Berlin
The battle between the Turks and the Christians, in the 16th century
Pulpit of St. Andreas Church, Eisleben, where Agricola and Luther preached
The original title page of On the Jews and Their Lies, written by Martin Luther in 1543
Luther on his deathbed, painting by Lucas Cranach the Elder
Martin Luther's grave, Schlosskirche, Wittenberg
Worldwide Protestantism in 2010
Luther Monument in Eisenach, Germany
Martin Luther College in New Ulm, Minnesota, United States
Various books of the Weimar Edition of Luther's works
Martin Luther's Death House, considered the site of Luther's death since 1726. However the building where Luther actually died (at Markt 56, now the site of Hotel Graf von Mansfeld) was torn down in 1570.<ref>Dorfpredigten: Biblische Einsichten aus Deutschlands 'wildem Süden'. Ausgewählte Predigten aus den Jahren 1998 bis 2007 Teil II 2002–2007 by Thomas O.H. Kaiser, p. 354</ref>
Casts of Luther's face and hands at his death, in the Market Church in Halle<ref>Martin Luther's Death Mask on View at Museum in Halle, Germany artdaily.com</ref>
Schlosskirche in Wittenberg, where Luther posted his Ninety-five Theses, is also his gravesite.
Luther's tombstone beneath the pulpit in the Castle Church in Wittenberg
Close-up of the grave with inscription in Latin
Luther with a swan (painting in the church at Strümpfelbach im Remstal, Weinstadt, Germany, by J. A. List)
Swan weather vane, Round Lutheran Church, Amsterdam
Altar in St Martin's Church, Halberstadt, Germany. Luther and the swan are toward the top on the right.
Coin commemorating Luther (engraving by Georg Wilhelm Göbel, Saxony, 1706)

Luther is honored in various ways by Christian traditions coming out directly from the Protestant Reformation, i.e. Lutheranism, the Reformed tradition, and Anglicanism.

Thomas Aquinas from Valle Romita Polyptych by Gentile da Fabriano

Christian theology

Theology of Christian belief and practice.

Theology of Christian belief and practice.

Thomas Aquinas from Valle Romita Polyptych by Gentile da Fabriano
Rembrandt's The Evangelist Matthew Inspired by an Angel, 1661
Christ in Gethsemane, Heinrich Hofmann, 1890
"Holy Trinity" from the Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, by Andrei Rublev, c. 1400, but more properly known as the "Hospitality of Abraham." The three angels symbolize the Trinity.
The various Christological positions, and their names
Jesus, believed to be both man and God, painting by Carl Heinrich Bloch
A depiction of Jesus and Mary, the Theotokos of Vladimir (12th century)
Holy Doors from Saint Catherine's Monastery, Mount Sinai, depicting the Annunciation, c. 12th century
The Resurrection of Christ by Carl Heinrich Bloch, 1875.
Statue of the Fallen Angel, Retiro Park (Madrid, Spain).
Dante and Beatrice gaze upon the highest heavens; from Gustave Doré's illustrations to the Divine Comedy.
Hell as depicted in Hieronymus Bosch's triptych The Garden of Earthly Delights (c. 1504).
A Sistine Chapel fresco depicts the expulsion of Adam and Eve from the garden of Eden for their sin of eating from the fruit of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil.
Augustine of Hippo wrote that original sin is transmitted by concupiscence and enfeebles freedom of the will without destroying it.
Christ with the Eucharist by Vicente Juan Masip, 16th century.
Detail from the Last Judgement by Michelangelo

Many Reformed theologians distinguish between the communicable attributes (those that human beings can also have) and the incommunicable attributes (those which belong to God alone).

Jesus Christ supporting an English flag and staff in the crook of his right arm depicted in a stained glass window in Rochester Cathedral, Kent

Anglicanism

Western Christian tradition that has developed from the practices, liturgy, and identity of the Church of England following the English Reformation, in the context of the Protestant Reformation in Europe.

Western Christian tradition that has developed from the practices, liturgy, and identity of the Church of England following the English Reformation, in the context of the Protestant Reformation in Europe.

Jesus Christ supporting an English flag and staff in the crook of his right arm depicted in a stained glass window in Rochester Cathedral, Kent
Saint Alban is venerated as the first-recorded British Christian martyr.
Augustine of Canterbury was the first Archbishop of Canterbury.
Queen Elizabeth I revived the Church of England in 1559, and established a uniform faith and practice. She took the title "Supreme Governor".
Frederick Denison Maurice was a prominent 19th-century Anglican theologian
Richard Hooker (1554–1600), one of the most influential figures in shaping Anglican theology and self-identity.
Thomas Cranmer wrote the first two editions of the BCP
An eastward-facing Solemn High Mass, a Catholic liturgical phenomenon which re-emerged in Anglicanism following the Catholic Revival of the 19th century
The 1596 Book of Common Prayer
Evensong at York Minster
The Arms of the See of Canterbury.
A priest in Eucharistic vestments.
The vestments of a deacon, including a stole over the left shoulder.
A world map showing the Provinces of the Anglican Communion (Blue). Shown are the Churches in full communion with the Anglican Church: The Nordic Lutheran churches of the Porvoo Communion (Green), and the Old Catholic Churches in the Utrecht Union (Red).
1854 image of the ruins of Jamestown Church, the first Anglican church in North America
High altar at the Anglo-Catholic Church of the Good Shepherd (Rosemont, Pennsylvania)
Christ Church Cathedral in Dublin
Justin Welby in South Korea. As the Archbishop of Canterbury, Welby is the symbolic head of the international Anglican Communion.

These reforms in the Church of England were understood by one of those most responsible for them, Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, and others as navigating a middle way between two of the emerging Protestant traditions, namely Lutheranism and Calvinism.

John Smyth is believed to have the first church labeled "Baptist" in Amsterdam in 1609

Baptists

Baptists form a major branch of Protestantism distinguished by baptizing professing Christian believers only (believer's baptism), and doing so by complete immersion.

Baptists form a major branch of Protestantism distinguished by baptizing professing Christian believers only (believer's baptism), and doing so by complete immersion.

John Smyth is believed to have the first church labeled "Baptist" in Amsterdam in 1609
A Short Declaration of the Mistery of Iniquity (1612) by Thomas Helwys. For Helwys, religious liberty was a right for everyone, even for those he disagreed with.
First Baptist Church on 2nd Street between Cherry & Poplar in Macon, GA, circa 1876.
The First Baptist Church in America located in Providence, Rhode Island.
Worship service at the Église Francophone CBCO Kintambo in Kinshasa, affiliated to the Baptist Community of Congo, 2019
Finnish Baptist church in Vaajakoski, Jyväskylä
Worship service at Crossway Baptist Church in Melbourne, affiliated with Australian Baptist Ministries, 2008
Hong Kong Baptist Theological Seminary, affiliated with the Baptist Convention of Hong Kong, 2008
Believer's baptism of adult by immersion at Northolt Park Baptist Church, in Greater London, Baptist Union of Great Britain, 2015.
Church sign indicating that the congregation uses the Authorized King James Version of the Bible of 1611
Show on the life of Jesus at Igreja da Cidade, affiliated to the Brazilian Baptist Convention, in São José dos Campos, Brazil, 2017
Chümoukedima Ao Baptist Church building in Chümoukedima, Nagaland affiliated with the Nagaland Baptist Church Council (India).
College of Nursing, Central Philippine University in Iloilo City, affiliated with the Convention of Philippine Baptist Churches, 2018
Wedding ceremony at First Baptist Church of Rivas, Baptist Convention of Nicaragua, 2011
First Baptist Church in Augusta, Georgia where the Southern Baptist Convention was founded
Martin Luther King Jr., a Baptist minister and civil rights leader. at the 1963 civil rights march on Washington, D.C. The Civil Rights movement divided various Baptists in the U.S., as slavery had more than a century earlier.
Charles Spurgeon later in life.

For example, Baptist theology may include Arminian or Calvinist beliefs with various sub-groups holding different or competing positions, while others allow for diversity in this matter within their denominations or congregations.

Jacques Lefèvre d'Étaples taught the doctrine of justification by faith alone before Martin Luther

Sola fide

Jacques Lefèvre d'Étaples taught the doctrine of justification by faith alone before Martin Luther
Jovinian has been argued to have taught similar views of justification as the Protestant reformers.
It is often argued that Clement of Rome is a witness to the doctrine of faith alone. However there is much controversy about his views
1861 painting of Luther discovering the Sola fide doctrine at Erfurt

Justificatio sola fide (or simply sola fide), meaning justification by faith alone, is a Christian theological doctrine commonly held to distinguish the Lutheran and Reformed traditions of Protestantism, among others, from the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Assyrian churches.

Ecumenism symbol from a plaque in St. Anne's Church, Augsburg, Germany. It shows Christianity as a boat at sea with the cross serving as the mast.

Ecumenism

Concept and principle that Christians who belong to different Christian denominations should work together to develop closer relationships among their churches and promote Christian unity.

Concept and principle that Christians who belong to different Christian denominations should work together to develop closer relationships among their churches and promote Christian unity.

Ecumenism symbol from a plaque in St. Anne's Church, Augsburg, Germany. It shows Christianity as a boat at sea with the cross serving as the mast.
Te Deum Ecuménico 2009 in the Santiago Metropolitan Cathedral, Chile. An ecumenical gathering of clergy from different denominations.
The consecration of Reginald Heber Weller as an Anglican bishop at the Cathedral of St. Paul the Apostle in the Protestant Episcopal Diocese of Fond du Lac, with the Rt. Rev. Anthony Kozlowski of the Polish National Catholic Church and the Patriarch Tikhon of Moscow (along with his chaplains John Kochurov, and Fr. Sebastian Dabovich) of the Russian Orthodox Church present
Bishop John M. Quinn of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Winona and Bishop Steven Delzer of Evangelical Lutheran Southeastern Minnesota Synod leading a Reformation Day service in 2017
Ecumenical worship service at the monastery of Taizé.
The Christian flag

Protestantism, for example, includes such diverse groups as Adventists, Anabaptists, Baptists, Congregationalists, Evangelicals, Hussites, Irvingians, Lutherans, Messianic Jews, Methodists (inclusive of the Holiness movement), Moravians, Pentecostals, Presbyterians, Reformed, and Waldensians.