A report on Cambridge, Massachusetts

Map showing the original boundaries of Cambridge and other Massachusetts cities and towns
George Washington in Cambridge, 1775
Map of Cambridge from 1873
1852 Map of Boston area showing Cambridge and regional rail lines and highlighting the course of the Middlesex Canal. Cambridge is toward the bottom of the map and outlined in yellow, and should not be confused with the pink-outlined and partially cropped "West Cambridge", now Arlington.
A view from Boston of Harvard's Weld Boathouse and Cambridge in winter. The Charles River is in the foreground.
Buildings of Kendall Square, center of Cambridge's biotech economy, seen from the Charles River
Fogg Museum, Harvard
Longfellow House–Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site
Stata Center, MIT
Simmons Hall, MIT
Alewife Brook Reservation
Cambridge City Hall in the 1980s
Aerial view of part of MIT's main campus
Dunster House, Harvard
The 1888 part of the Cambridge Public Library
Massachusetts Avenue in Harvard Square
Central Station on the MBTA Red Line
The Weeks Bridge provides a pedestrian-only connection between Boston's Allston-Brighton neighborhood and Cambridge over the Charles River.
Engine 2, Paramedic Squad 2, Ladder 3 firehouse
Central Square
Harvard Square
Inman Square

City in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and part of the Boston metropolitan area as a major suburb of Boston.

- Cambridge, Massachusetts

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Boston

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Capital and most populous city of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States and 24th-most populous city in the country.

Capital and most populous city of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States and 24th-most populous city in the country.

In 1773, a group of angered Bostonian citizens threw a shipment of tea by the East India Company into Boston Harbor as a response to the Tea Act, in an event known as the Boston Tea Party.
Map showing a British tactical evaluation of Boston in 1775.
Boston, as the Eagle and the Wild Goose See It, 1860, by J.W. Black, the first recorded aerial photograph
State Street, 1801
View of downtown Boston from Dorchester Heights, 1841
Tremont Street, 1843
The was home to the Boston city council from 1865 to 1969.
General view of Boston, by J. J. Hawes, c. 1860s–1880s
Haymarket Square, 1909
Back Bay neighborhood
Boston as seen from ESA Sentinel-2. Boston Harbor, at the center, has made Boston a major shipping port since its founding.
Panoramic map of Boston (1877)
200 Clarendon Street is the tallest building in Boston, with a roof height of 790 ft.
Boston's skyline in the background, with fall foliage in the foreground
A graph of cumulative winter snowfall at Logan International Airport from 1938 to 2015. The four winters with the most snowfall are highlighted. The snowfall data, which was collected by NOAA, is from the weather station at the airport.
Per capita income in the Greater Boston area, by US Census block group, 2000. The dashed line shows the boundary of the City of Boston.
Map of racial distribution in Boston, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
Chinatown, with its paifang gate, is home to many Chinese and also Vietnamese restaurants.
U.S. Navy sailors march in Boston's annual St. Patrick's Day Parade. Irish Americans constitute the largest ethnicity in Boston.
Boston gay pride march, held annually in June
Old South Church, a United Church of Christ congregation first organized in 1669
Boston Latin School was established in 1635 and is the oldest public high school in the US.
Map of Boston-area universities
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is often cited as among the world's top universities
Harvard Business School, one of the country's top business schools
A Boston Police cruiser on Beacon Street
The Old State House, a museum on the Freedom Trail near the site of the Boston massacre
In the nineteenth century, the Old Corner Bookstore became a gathering place for writers, including Emerson, Thoreau, and Margaret Fuller. Here James Russell Lowell printed the first editions of The Atlantic Monthly.
Symphony Hall, home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra
Museum of Fine Arts
Population density and elevation above sea level in Greater Boston (2010)
Fenway Park is the oldest professional baseball stadium still in use.
The Celtics play at the TD Garden.
Harvard Stadium, the first collegiate athletic stadium built in the U.S.
An aerial view of Boston Common
Chamber of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in the Massachusetts State House
Boston City Hall is a Brutalist landmark in the city
Harvard Medical School, one of the most prestigious medical schools in the world
An MBTA Red Line train departing Boston for Cambridge. Bostonians depend heavily on public transit, with over 1.3 million Bostonians riding the city's buses and trains daily (2013).
South Station, the busiest rail hub in New England, is a terminus of Amtrak and numerous MBTA rail lines.
Bluebikes in Boston
Michelle Wu, the 55th Mayor of Boston
Headquarters of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

It is bordered to the east by the town of Winthrop and the Boston Harbor Islands, to the northeast by the cities of Revere, Chelsea and Everett, to the north by the cities of Somerville and Cambridge, to the northwest by Watertown, to the west by the city of Newton and town of Brookline, to the southwest by the town of Dedham and small portions of Needham and Canton, and to the southeast by the town of Milton, and the city of Quincy.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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Stereographic card showing an MIT mechanical drafting studio, 19th century (photo by E. L. Allen, left/right inverted)
Original Rogers Building, Back Bay, Boston, c. 1901
A 1905 map of MIT's Boston campus
The then-new Cambridge campus, completed in 1916. The Harvard Bridge (named after John Harvard but otherwise unrelated to Harvard University) is in the foreground, connecting Boston to Cambridge.
Plaque in Building 6 honoring George Eastman, founder of Eastman Kodak, who was revealed as the anonymous "Mr. Smith" who helped maintain MIT's independence
ROTC students at MIT in 2019
The MIT Media Lab houses researchers developing novel uses of computer technology and shown here is the 1985 building, designed by I.M. Pei, with an extension (right of photo) designed by Fumihiko Maki opened in March 2010
The central and eastern sections of MIT's campus as seen from above Massachusetts Avenue and the Charles River. Left of center is the Great Dome overlooking Killian Court, with Kendall Square to the upper right.
MIT's Building 10 and Great Dome overlooking Killian Court
The Stata Center houses CSAIL, LIDS, and the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy
The Simmons Hall undergrad dormitory was completed in 2002
Lobby 7 (at 77 Massachusetts Avenue) is regarded as the main entrance to campus
The Infinite Corridor is the primary passageway through campus.
Eero Saarinen's Kresge Auditorium (1955) is a classic example of post-war architecture
Walker Memorial is a monument to MIT's fourth president, Francis Amasa Walker
MIT main campus seen from Vassar Street, as The Great Dome is visible in the distance and the Stata Center is at right
The GNU project and free software movement originated at MIT
The start of the MIT Mystery Hunt in 2007
The Zesiger Sports and Fitness Center houses a two-story fitness center as well as swimming and diving pools
Institute Professors Emeriti and Nobel Laureates (from left to right) Franco Modigliani (deceased), Paul Samuelson (also deceased), and Robert Solow (picture taken in 2000)
Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin, ScD 1963 (MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics)
Former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, SM 1972 (MIT Sloan School of Management)
President of Colombia (1986–1990) Virgilio Barco Vargas, SB 1943 (MIT Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Former Federal Reserve Bank chairman Ben Bernanke, PhD 1979 (MIT Department of Economics)
Economics Nobel laureate Esther Duflo, PhD 1999 (MIT Department of Economics), also an MIT professor<ref>{{cite web |title=Curriculum Vitae (Esther Duflo) |url=https://economics.mit.edu/files/14455 |publisher=MIT |access-date=13 October 2020}}</ref>
Physicist and Nobel laureate Richard Feynman, SB 1939 (MIT Department of Physics)<ref>{{cite web |title=Richard P. Feynman - Biographical |url=https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/1965/feynman/biographical/ |publisher=Nobel Foundation |access-date=12 September 2020}}</ref>
Astronaut and USAF Colonel Michael Fincke, SB 1989 (MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics), SB 1989 (MIT Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences)
Sculptor Daniel Chester French, Did not graduate
Economics Nobel laureate Paul Krugman, PhD 1977 (MIT Department of Economics)
Space Shuttle Challenger astronaut and physicist Ronald McNair, PhD 1976 (MIT Department of Physics)
Israeli Former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, SB 1975 (MIT Architecture), SM 1976 (MIT Sloan School of Management)
Architect I. M. Pei, BArch 1940 (MIT Architecture)
Claude Shannon, PhD 1940 (MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
CEO of General Motors Alfred P. Sloan, SB 1895 (MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
"Boston" guitarist Tom Scholz, SB 1969, SM 1970 (MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering)
Astronaut and engineer Mike Massimino, PhD 1992 (MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering)
Chemist and Nobel laureate Robert Burns Woodward, SB 1936, PhD 1937<ref>{{cite web |title=Robert B. Woodward - Biographical |url=https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/chemistry/1965/woodward/biographical/ |publisher=Nobel Foundation |access-date=4 October 2020}}</ref>

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private land-grant research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Somerville, Massachusetts

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The Old Powder House in Nathan Tufts Park
Ross Moffett's A Skirmish Between British and Colonists near Somerville in Revolutionary Times, 1937
Martha Perry Lowe School (1904)
1884 map of Somerville demarcating each of the wards within the city
Seven Hills Park at Davis Square. The towers in the park each represent one of the city's original hills.
Entrance of the Somerville Theatre
Somerville City Hall
Façade of Somerville High School
The historic Somerville Journal Building in 2009
1907 postcard of Somerville Highlands Station
Route of the Green Line Extension
McGrath Highway (Route 28) in Somerville

Somerville is a city located directly to the northwest of Boston, and north of Cambridge, in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States.

Watertown, Massachusetts

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City in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and is part of Greater Boston.

City in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and is part of Greater Boston.

Saltonstall's landing spot in Watertown, also known as Elbridge Gerry Landing
Edmund Fowle House, built in the 1700s and used by the Massachusetts government during the Revolutionary War
Browne House, built c. 1694
St. Stephen Armenian Apostolic Church
Hairenik Association building – Watertown, Mass.
Benjamin Robbins Curtis
Eliza Dushku

The first buildings were upon land now included within the limits of Cambridge known as Gerry's Landing.

Coat of arms

Harvard University

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Coat of arms
Coat of arms
The seal of the Harvard Corporation, found on Harvard diplomas. Christo et Ecclesiae ("For Christ and Church") is one of Harvard's several early mottoes.
Engraving of Harvard College by Paul Revere, 1767
John Harvard statue, Harvard Yard
Richard Rummell's 1906 watercolor landscape view, facing northeast.
Memorial Hall
Memorial Church
Harvard Medical School
University seal
Massachusetts Hall (1720), Harvard's oldest building
Harvard Yard
Widener Library anchors the Harvard Library system.
Henry Moore's sculpture Large Four Piece Reclining Figure, near Lamont Library
Tower at the University of Puerto Rico, showing (right) the emblem of Harvardthe oldest in the United Statesand (left) that of National University of San Marcos, Limathe oldest in the Americas
2nd President of the United States John Adams (AB, 1755; AM, 1758)<ref>{{cite web |last1=Barzilay |first1=Karen N. |title=The Education of John Adams |url=https://www.masshist.org/object-of-the-month/objects/the-education-of-john-adams-2007-06-01 |publisher=Massachusetts Historical Society |access-date=20 September 2020 |archive-date=July 26, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20210726202845/https://www.masshist.org/object-of-the-month/objects/the-education-of-john-adams-2007-06-01 |url-status=live }}</ref>
6th President of the United States John Quincy Adams (AB, 1787; AM, 1790)<ref>{{cite web |title=John Quincy Adams |url=https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/presidents/john-quincy-adams/ |publisher=The White House |access-date=21 September 2020 |archive-date=October 5, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211005104815/https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/presidents/john-quincy-adams/ |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{cite web |last1=Hogan |first1=Margaret A. |title=John Quincy Adams: Life Before the Presidency |date=October 4, 2016 |url=https://millercenter.org/president/jqadams/life-before-the-presidency |publisher=Miller Center |access-date=21 September 2020 |archive-date=August 12, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20210812123606/https://millercenter.org/president/jqadams/life-before-the-presidency |url-status=live }}</ref>
Essayist, lecturer, philosopher, and poet Ralph Waldo Emerson (AB, 1821)
Naturalist, essayist, poet, and philosopher Henry David Thoreau (AB, 1837)
19th President of the United States Rutherford B. Hayes (LLB, 1845)<ref>{{cite web |title=HLS's first alumnus elected as President—Rutherford B. Hayes |url=https://today.law.harvard.edu/hlss-first-alumnus-elected-as-president-rutherford-b-hayes/ |publisher=Harvard Law Today |access-date=21 September 2020 |archive-date=April 14, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20210414135644/https://today.law.harvard.edu/hlss-first-alumnus-elected-as-president-rutherford-b-hayes/ |url-status=live }}</ref>
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. (AB, 1861, LLB)
Philosopher, logician, and mathematician Charles Sanders Peirce (AB, 1862, SB 1863)
26th President of the United States and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Theodore Roosevelt (AB, 1880)<ref>{{cite web |title=Theodore Roosevelt - Biographical |url=https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/peace/1906/roosevelt/biographical/ |publisher=Nobel Foundation |access-date=21 September 2020 |archive-date=September 5, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20210905033556/https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/peace/1906/roosevelt/biographical/ |url-status=live }}</ref>
Sociologist and civil rights activist
32nd President of the United States Franklin D. Roosevelt (AB, 1903)<ref>{{cite web |last1=Leuchtenburg |first1=William E. |title=Franklin D. Roosevelt: Life Before the Presidency |date=October 4, 2016 |url=https://millercenter.org/president/fdroosevelt/life-before-the-presidency |publisher=Miller Center |access-date=21 September 2020 |archive-date=August 13, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20210813025557/https://millercenter.org/president/fdroosevelt/life-before-the-presidency |url-status=live }}</ref>
Author, political activist, and lecturer Helen Keller (AB, 1904, Radcliffe College)
Poet and Nobel laureate in literature T. S. Eliot (AB, 1909; AM, 1910)
Physicist and leader of Manhattan Project J. Robert Oppenheimer (AB, 1925)
Economist and Nobel laureate in economics Paul Samuelson (AM, 1936; PhD, 1941)
Musician and composer Leonard Bernstein (AB, 1939)
35th President of the United States John F. Kennedy (AB, 1940)<ref>{{cite web |last1=Selverstone |first1=Marc J. |title=John F. Kennedy: Life Before the Presidency |date=October 4, 2016 |url=https://millercenter.org/president/kennedy/life-before-the-presidency |publisher=Miller Center |access-date=21 September 2020 |archive-date=August 12, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20210812190501/https://millercenter.org/president/kennedy/life-before-the-presidency |url-status=live }}</ref>
7th President of Ireland and United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson (LLM, 1968)
45th Vice President of the United States and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Al Gore (AB, 1969)
24th President of Liberia and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Ellen Johnson Sirleaf (MPA, 1971)<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/2011/johnson_sirleaf-bio.html|title=Ellen Johnson Sirleaf - Biographical|website=www.nobelprize.org|access-date=October 14, 2020|archive-date=July 24, 2018|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20180724032807/https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/2011/johnson_sirleaf-bio.html|url-status=live}}</ref>
Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (AB, 1971; JD, 1975)
11th Prime Minister of Pakistan Benazir Bhutto (AB, 1973, Radcliffe College)
14th Chair of the Federal Reserve Ben Bernanke (AB, 1975; AM, 1975)
43rd President of the United States George W. Bush (MBA, 1975)<ref>{{cite web |last1=L. Gregg II |first1=Gary |title=George W. Bush: Life Before the Presidency |date=October 4, 2016 |url=https://millercenter.org/president/gwbush/life-before-the-presidency |publisher=Miller Center |access-date=21 September 2020 |archive-date=August 12, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20210812225623/https://millercenter.org/president/gwbush/life-before-the-presidency |url-status=live }}</ref>
17th Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts (AB, 1976; JD, 1979)
Founder of Microsoft and philanthropist Bill Gates (College, 1977;<ref group="a" name="nodegree">Nominal Harvard College class year: did not graduate</ref> LLD hc, 2007)
8th Secretary-General of the United Nations Ban Ki-moon (MPA, 1984)
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States Elena Kagan (JD, 1986)
Former First Lady of the United States Michelle Obama (JD, 1988)
Biochemist and Nobel laureate in chemistry Jennifer Doudna (PhD, 1989)<ref>{{cite web|title=Press release: The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2020|url=https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/chemistry/2020/press-release/|website=nobelprize.org|publisher=Nobel Foundation|access-date=October 14, 2020|archive-date=October 8, 2020|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20201008001709/https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/chemistry/2020/press-release/|url-status=live}}</ref>
44th President of the United States and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Barack Obama (JD, 1991)<ref>{{cite web |title=Barack Obama: Life Before the Presidency |date=October 4, 2016 |url=https://millercenter.org/president/obama/life-before-the-presidency |publisher=Miller Center |access-date=21 September 2020 |archive-date=August 12, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20210812142731/https://millercenter.org/president/obama/life-before-the-presidency |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{cite web |title=Barack H. Obama - Biographical |url=https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/peace/2009/obama/biographical/ |publisher=Nobel Foundation |access-date=21 September 2020 |archive-date=April 14, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20210414110039/https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/peace/2009/obama/biographical/ |url-status=live }}</ref>
Associate Justice-designate of the Supreme Court of the United States Ketanji Brown Jackson (JD, 1992)
Founder of Facebook Mark Zuckerberg (College, 2004; LLD hc, 2017)
Louis Agassiz
Danielle Allen
Alan Dershowitz
Paul Farmer
Jason Furman
John Kenneth Galbraith
Henry Louis Gates Jr.
Asa Gray
Seamus Heaney
Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr.
William James
Timothy Leary
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
James Russell Lowell
Greg Mankiw
Steven Pinker
Michael Porter
Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr.
Amartya Sen
B. F. Skinner
Lawrence Summers
Cass Sunstein
Elizabeth Warren
Cornel West
E. O. Wilson
Shing-Tung Yau
Robert Reich
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States Elena Kagan (JD, 1986)
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States Ketanji Brown Jackson (JD, 1992)

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Massachusetts

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Most populous state in the New England region of the United States.

Most populous state in the New England region of the United States.

The Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor by William Halsall (1882). The Pilgrims founded Plymouth in 1620.
An illustration of the Battles of Lexington and Concord
John Adams, 2nd President of the United States (1797–1801)
Textile mills such as the one in Lowell made Massachusetts a leader in the Industrial Revolution.
John F. Kennedy, Massachusetts native and 35th President of the United States (1961–1963)
Boston Marathon bombing
A portion of the north-central Pioneer Valley in South Deerfield
Köppen climate types in Massachusetts
Massachusetts population density map. The centers of high-density settlement, from east to west, are Boston, Worcester, Springfield, and Pittsfield, respectively.
Saint Patrick's Day parade in Scituate, the municipality with the highest percentage identifying Irish ancestry in the United States, at 47.5% in 2010. Irish Americans constitute the largest ethnicity in Massachusetts.
Boston's Chinatown, with its paifang gate, is home to many Chinese and also Vietnamese restaurants.
Boston gay pride march, held annually in June. In 2004 Massachusetts became the first U.S. state to legalize same-sex marriage.
Built in 1681, the Old Ship Church in Hingham is the oldest church in America in continuous ecclesiastical use. Massachusetts has since become one of the most irreligious states in the U.S.
Towns in Massachusetts by combined mean SAT of their public high school district for the 2015–2016 academic year
Sunset at Brewster, on Cape Cod Bay.
The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, serving Greater Boston
Logan International Airport in Boston is the largest airport in New England in terms of passenger volume
Prominent roads and cities in Massachusetts
The Massachusetts State House, topped by its golden dome, faces Boston Common on Beacon Hill.
Charlie Baker (R), the 72nd Governor of Massachusetts
Boston Pride Parade, 2012. From left: Representative Joe Kennedy III, Senator Elizabeth Warren, and former representative Barney Frank.
The site of Henry David Thoreau's cabin at Walden Pond in Concord
Massachusetts has the largest population of the New England states. New Englander culture and identity remains strong in Massachusetts (Flag of New England pictured above).
An outdoor dance performance at Jacob's Pillow in Becket
USS Constitution fires a salute during its annual Fourth of July turnaround cruise
Map showing the average medicare reimbursement per enrollee for the counties in Massachusetts.
Gillette Stadium in Foxborough is the home venue for the New England Patriots (NFL) and the New England Revolution (MLS)
Koppen climate of Massachusetts
A 1779 five-shilling note issued by Massachusetts.
Koppen climate of Massachusetts

Harvard University in Cambridge is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States, with the largest financial endowment of any university.

Middlesex County, Massachusetts

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Located in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in the United States.

Located in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in the United States.

It is included in the Census Bureau's Boston–Cambridge–Newton, MA–NH Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Massachusetts Avenue near Beacon Street in Boston

Massachusetts Avenue (metropolitan Boston)

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Major thoroughfare in Boston, Massachusetts, and several cities and towns northwest of Boston.

Major thoroughfare in Boston, Massachusetts, and several cities and towns northwest of Boston.

Massachusetts Avenue near Beacon Street in Boston
77 Massachusetts Avenue, the site of MIT, is an important landmark in Cambridge.
Massachusetts Avenue forms the commercial heart of Cambridge's Central Square.

It crosses the Charles River from the Back Bay neighborhood of Boston into the city of Cambridge via the Harvard Bridge, where passes both US-Route 3 and MA-Route 3, it then bisects the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, passes through Central Square, and curves around two sides of Harvard Yard at Harvard Square.

Newton, Massachusetts

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City in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States.

City in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States.

Emily Lavan, Heartbreak Hill, 2005 Boston Marathon
Union Street, Newton Centre
The Jackson Homestead
Chestnut Hill Reservoir
Newton Public Library
A panoramic view of Newton North High School

Newton was settled in 1630 as part of "the newe towne", which was renamed Cambridge in 1638.

Charles River

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80 mi river in eastern Massachusetts.

80 mi river in eastern Massachusetts.

View of the bridge over Charles River, New York Public Library
View of the Charles River, Memorial Drive in Cambridge(foreground), and the Back Bay skyline at night
A sunny day on the Charles River Esplanade
Sailboats moored on the Charlestown side of the Charles River with Bunker Hill Monument in the distance
Sunset at Charles River in December 2010
American Shad (Alosa Sapidissima)
View of the Charles River, Community Rowing, Inc. and Boston from Nonantum.
The Charles River from the Boston side, facing Weld Boathouse and the main campus of Harvard University in Cambridge.
View of Charles River at Newton Upper Falls
Charles River under Echo Bridge in Newton
Charles River at Medfield-Millis town line
Charles River basin from an office tower in Boston.
Charles River Esplanade, 2013
Charles River Esplanade, 2013
View of the Charles River and Downtown Boston from the Boston University Bridge
John W. Weeks Bridge

Near its mouth, it forms the border between downtown Boston and Cambridge and Charlestown.