Cameron–Clegg coalition

coalition governmentCoalitionConservative-Liberal Democrat coalitionConservative-Liberal Democrat coalition governmentCameron MinistryCameron–CleggConservative–Liberal Democrat coalition governmentUK coalition governmentCameron Government2010 coalition government
David Cameron and Nick Clegg formed the Cameron–Clegg coalition, after the former was invited by Queen Elizabeth II to form a new government, following the resignation of Prime Minister Gordon Brown on 11 May 2010.wikipedia
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David Cameron

CameronPrime Minister David CameronPrime Minister
David Cameron and Nick Clegg formed the Cameron–Clegg coalition, after the former was invited by Queen Elizabeth II to form a new government, following the resignation of Prime Minister Gordon Brown on 11 May 2010. On 4 September 2012, David Cameron reshuffled his cabinet for the first time.
The 2010 general election led to Cameron becoming Prime Minister as the head of a coalition government with the Liberal Democrats – the youngest holder of the office since the 1810s.

Second Cameron ministry

Cameron IIIIConservative government
The coalition was succeeded by the single-party Cameron ministry after the 2015 general election.
Prior to the election Cameron had led the Cameron–Clegg coalition, a coalition government that consisted of members of the Conservatives and the Liberal Democrats, with Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg as Deputy Prime Minister.

2010 United Kingdom general election

2010 general election20102010 election
The previous Parliament had been dissolved on 12 April 2010 in advance of the general election on 6 May.
The coalition government that was subsequently formed was the first coalition in British history to eventuate directly from an election outcome.

2015 United Kingdom general election

2015 general election20152015 UK general election
The coalition was succeeded by the single-party Cameron ministry after the 2015 general election.
Having governed in coalition with the Liberal Democrats since 2010, the Conservatives won 330 seats and 36.9% of the vote, this time winning a working majority of twelve seats.

Nick Clegg

Nicholas CleggSir Nick CleggClegg
David Cameron and Nick Clegg formed the Cameron–Clegg coalition, after the former was invited by Queen Elizabeth II to form a new government, following the resignation of Prime Minister Gordon Brown on 11 May 2010.
During the party's time in coalition, the Liberal Democrats saw a significant drop in support, and the 2015 general election left the party with just 8 seats, which resulted in Clegg's ousting as Deputy Prime Minister and his resignation as party leader.

Conservative–Liberal Democrat coalition agreement

coalition agreementConservative – Liberal Democrat Coalition Agreementcoalition government
In the Conservative–Liberal Democrat coalition agreement of 11 May 2010, the two parties formed a coalition government.
It formed the terms of reference governing the Cameron–Clegg coalition, the coalition government comprising MPs from the Conservative Party and the Liberal Democrats.

Liberal Democrats (UK)

Liberal DemocratsLiberal DemocratLib Dem
It was the first coalition government in the UK since the Churchill war ministry and was led by Cameron with Clegg as Deputy Prime Minister, composed of members of both the Conservative Party and the Liberal Democrats.
Under its leader Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democrats were junior partners in David Cameron's Conservative-led coalition government in which Clegg served as Deputy Prime Minister.

Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Deputy Prime MinisterBritish Deputy Prime MinisterShadow Deputy Prime Minister
It was the first coalition government in the UK since the Churchill war ministry and was led by Cameron with Clegg as Deputy Prime Minister, composed of members of both the Conservative Party and the Liberal Democrats.
In a coalition government, such as the 2010–2015 coalition government between the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats, the appointment of the leader of the smaller party (in the 2010 case, Nick Clegg, leader of the Liberal Democrats) as Deputy Prime Minister is done to give that person more authority within the Cabinet to enforce the coalition's agreed-upon agenda.

2012 British cabinet reshuffle

2012 Cabinet Reshufflecabinet reshuffleCameron's first major reshuffle
On 4 September 2012, David Cameron reshuffled his cabinet for the first time.
British prime minister David Cameron conducted the first major reshuffle of his coalition government on 4 September 2012.

2014 British cabinet reshuffle

15 July 2014 cabinet reshuffle2014 reshufflea 2014 Cabinet reshuffle
He reshuffled his cabinet for the second time on 14 July 2014.
British prime minister David Cameron reshuffled the Conservative members of his coalition government on 15 July 2014.

John Leech (politician)

John LeechJohn Leech.John Leech MP
Of the 57 Liberal Democrat MPs, only two refused to support the Conservative Coalition agreement, with former leader Charles Kennedy and Manchester Withington MP John Leech both rebelling.
He was one of two Lib Dem MPs to vote against entering Coalition in 2010 and the first MP to speak out against the under-occupancy penalty (commonly called the 'bedroom tax') in Parliament.

Ed Davey

Edward DaveySir Ed DaveySir Edward Davey
He served in the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition as Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change from 2012 to 2015, having previously served as Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, with responsibility for Employment Relations, Consumer and Postal Affairs, since 2010.

Coalition government

coalitioncoalition cabinetcoalition governments
It was the first coalition government in the UK since the Churchill war ministry and was led by Cameron with Clegg as Deputy Prime Minister, composed of members of both the Conservative Party and the Liberal Democrats.
The 2010 general election resulted in a hung parliament (Britain's first for 36 years), and the Conservatives, led by David Cameron, which had won the largest number of seats, formed a coalition with the Liberal Democrats in order to gain a parliamentary majority, ending 13 years of Labour government.

Sayeeda Warsi, Baroness Warsi

Baroness WarsiSayeeda WarsiThe Baroness Warsi
* On 5 August 2014, Sayeeda Warsi resigned as Minister of State at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, and as Minister for Faith and Community, in protest at the Government's response to the conflict in the Gaza Strip.
She served in David Cameron's Cabinet, first as the Minister without portfolio between 2010 and 2012, then as the Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Office and as the Minister of State for Faith and Communities (styled as "Senior Minister of State"), until her resignation citing her disagreement with the Government's policy on the Israel–Gaza conflict in August 2014.

United Kingdom cabinet committee

cabinet committeecabinet sub-committeeCabinet Committees
Each cabinet committee had a chair from one party and a deputy chair from the other; there was also a cabinet committee specifically overseeing the operation of the coalition.
In the 2010 coalition government, each Cabinet committee included members of both the Conservative Party and the Liberal Democrats.

Philip Hammond

HammondPhillip Hammond The Right Honourable '''Philip Hammond
After the formation of the Coalition Government in May 2010, he was appointed Secretary of State for Transport and was sworn of the Privy Council.

Danny Alexander

Sir Danny AlexanderDanny Alexander MP The Right Honourable '''Danny Alexander
With the 2010 General Election producing a hung parliament, he was one of the four man Liberal Democrat negotiating team in the drawing up of the coalition document for the new Coalition Government with the Conservative Party.

Jo Swinson

Jo '''SwinsonJo Swinson MPJoanna Kate Swinson
In 2010, after the Liberal Democrats entered into a coalition government with the Conservative Party, Swinson served as a Parliamentary Private Secretary to Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, and was later appointed Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Employment Relations and Postal Affairs.

Jonathan Hill, Baron Hill of Oareford

Jonathan HillThe Lord Hill of OarefordLord Hill of Oareford
Prior to that, he served as Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools from 2010 to 2013 in the Conservative-Lib Dem Government.

Financial Secretary to the Treasury

Shadow Financial Secretary to the TreasuryFinancial Secretary to HM TreasuryFinancial Secretaries to the Treasury
In May 2010 as part of the ministerial reorganisation by the First Cameron ministry, the Financial Secretary was given the additional semi-official title of City Minister.

Alistair Carmichael

The Right Honourable '''Alistair Carmichael1Alexander Morrison Carmichael
He is the Deputy Leader of the Scottish Liberal Democrats and, from 7 October 2013 to 8 May 2015, was the Secretary of State for Scotland in the Conservative-Lib Dem coalition government.

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
It was the first coalition government in the UK since the Churchill war ministry and was led by Cameron with Clegg as Deputy Prime Minister, composed of members of both the Conservative Party and the Liberal Democrats.
Following the resignation of Gordon Brown as Prime Minister and Leader of the Labour Party five days afterwards, David Cameron was named as the country's new Prime Minister and the Conservatives entered government in a coalition with the Liberal Democrats—the first post-war coalition government.

R v Huhne

R v Huhne and Prycepleads guilty2013 trial
On 12 May 2010 he was appointed to the cabinet office of Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change under the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition formed after the 2010 general election.

Prime Minister's Questions

PMQsPrime Minister's Question TimePrime Minister’s Questions
Clegg, as Deputy Prime Minister, took Prime Minister's Questions (PMQ) when Cameron was unavailable.
During the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government from 2010–2015, the leader of the Liberal Democrats, as a member of the government, did not ask questions during PMQs.

Francis Maude

Hon. Francis MaudeFrancis Anthony Aylmer MaudeLord Maude of Horsham
He is best known for driving over £50bn of cumulative efficiency savings under the 2010-15 Cameron-Clegg coalition.