Camino Real de Tierra Adentro

El Camino Real de Tierra AdentroCamino RealEl Camino Real de Tierra Adentro National Historic TrailChihuahua TrailEl Camino RealEl Camino Real National Scenic BywayEl Camino Real trailEl Camino Real de Tierra Adentro-Arroyo Alamillo North SectionEl Camino Real Historic Trailold road
The Camino Real de Tierra Adentro (Royal Road of the Interior Land) was an historic 2560 km trade route between Mexico City and San Juan Pueblo (Ohkay Owingeh), New Mexico, USA, from 1598 to 1882.wikipedia
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Chihuahua (state)

ChihuahuaChihuahua, Mexicostate of Chihuahua
In 2010, 55 sites and five existing UNESCO World Heritage Sites along the Mexican section of the route were collectively added to the World Heritage List, including historic cities, towns, bridges, haciendas and other monuments along the 1400 km route between the Historic Center of Mexico City (an independent World Heritage Site) and the town of Valle de Allende, Chihuahua.
The discovery of El Paso Del Norte was important for the expansion of El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro (The Inner Land Royal Road) to link Spanish settlements in New Mexico to Mexico City; El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro facilitated transport of settlers and supplies to New Mexico and Camargo.

List of World Heritage Sites by year of inscription

201920172008
In 2010, 55 sites and five existing UNESCO World Heritage Sites along the Mexican section of the route were collectively added to the World Heritage List, including historic cities, towns, bridges, haciendas and other monuments along the 1400 km route between the Historic Center of Mexico City (an independent World Heritage Site) and the town of Valle de Allende, Chihuahua.

Albuquerque, New Mexico

AlbuquerqueAlbuquerque, NMNew Mexico (Albuquerque)
The villa of San Felipe Neri de Alburquerque (present-day Albuquerque, New Mexico) was founded in 1706 and it also became an important terminal.
The city’s nicknames are The Duke City and Burque, both of which reference its 1706 founding as La Villa de Alburquerque in Nuevo México, as an outpost on El Camino Real for the Tiquex and Hispano towns in the area (such as Barelas, Corrales, Isleta Pueblo, Los Ranchos, and Sandia Pueblo).

Jornada del Muerto

Jornada del Muerto DesertJornada del Muerto ValleyMuerto desert
The most feared section of the journey was the crossing of the Jornada del Muerto beyond El Paso del Norte: nearly 100 km of expansive, barren desert without any water sources to hydrate the men and beasts.
The route later became a section of the Camino Real de Tierra Adentro.

Santa Fe Trail

Santa FeSanta Fe National Historic TrailCimarron Cutoff
Between 1821 and 1822, after the end of the war for the Independence of Mexico, the Santa Fe Trail was established to connect the US territory of Missouri with Santa Fe.
Santa Fe was near the end of the El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, which carried trade from Mexico City.

Las Cruces, New Mexico

Las CrucesLas Cruces, NMNew Mexico (Las Cruces)
Another of the forces commanded by Colonel Alexander William Doniphan defeated a small group of Mexican contingents on the Camino Real in the Los Brazitos area south of what is now Las Cruces, New Mexico.
Later, a group of about 40 travelers coming along the Camino Real de Tierra Adentro died nearby, resulting in a similar group of crosses.

National Trails System

National Scenic TrailNational Historic TrailNational Trails System Act
The 404 mi section of the route within the United States was proclaimed the El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro National Historic Trail, a part of the National Historic Trail system, on October 13, 2000.

Mexico

MexicanMéxicoMEX
During 1846 - 1847, the Camino Real de Tierra Adentro became a path of continuous use, with American forces using it to travel into the interior of Mexico.
The Camino Real de Tierra Adentro connected Mexico City with the interior of New Spain.

New Mexico

NMState of New MexicoNew Mexican
With the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo signed in February 1848, the war officially ended, with Mexico ceding most of its northern territories to the US, including parts of what are now the US states of New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and all of California, Nevada and Utah. In the United States, from the Texas–New Mexico border to San Juan Pueblo north of Española, the original route (at one point designated U.S. Route 85 but later superseded with US Interstate Highways 10 and 25) has been designated a National Scenic Byway called El Camino Real.
Oñate extended El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, Royal Road of the Interior, by 700 mi from Santa Bárbara, Chihuahua, to his remote colony.

Santa Fe, New Mexico

Santa FeSanta Fe, NMSante Fe
Between 1821 and 1822, after the end of the war for the Independence of Mexico, the Santa Fe Trail was established to connect the US territory of Missouri with Santa Fe. This trail became the Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, the northernmost of the four main "royal roads" – the Caminos Reales – that linked Mexico City to its major tributaries in Acapulco, Veracruz, Audiencia (Guatemala) and Santa Fe.
Santa Fe is the terminus of three National Historic Trails: El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro National Historic Trail, the Old Spanish National Historic Trail, and the Santa Fe National Historic Trail.

Tome, New Mexico

TomeTomé
One of the soldiers provided an estimate of the population of several cities along the Camino, including: Algodones, New Mexico with 1,000 inhabitants; Bernalillo with 500; Sandía Pueblo with 300 to 400, Albuquerque without an estimated number but extant for seven or eight miles along the Rio Grande; Rancho de los Placeres with 200 or 300; Tomé with 2,000; Socorro, described as a "considerable city"; Paso del Norte with 5,000 to 6,000, and Carrizal, Chihuahua with 400 inhabitants.
Once an important town on the Camino Real, it suffered due to Native American attacks and flooding during the 1800s.

New Spain

Viceroyalty of New SpainSpanishNueva España
After the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, which violently forced the Spanish out of Nuevo México, the Spanish Crown decided not to abandon the province altogether but instead maintained a channel to the province so as not to completely abandon their subjects remaining there.
Oñate pioneered 'The Royal Road of the Interior Land' or El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro between Mexico City and the Tewa village of Ohkay Owingeh, or San Juan Pueblo.

Sombrerete, Zacatecas

Sombrerete
1351-031: Historic center of Sombrerete.
The historical center of Sombrerete, La Noria de San Pantaleón and the Sierra de Órganos National Park were declared in the year 2010 a UNESCO World Heritage Site, adscripted to the Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, spanish for “Royal Road of the Interior Land”.

Fort Selden

Fort SeldonFort Selden State MonumentCamp Robledo
Fort Craig and Fort Selden are also located along the trail.
The site was long a campground along the El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro.

Fort Craig

Fort Craig, New MexicoCraig
Fort Craig and Fort Selden are also located along the trail.
Fort Craig was a U.S. Army fort located along El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, near Elephant Butte Lake State Park and the Rio Grande in Socorro County, New Mexico.

National Scenic Byway

All-American RoadNational Scenic BywaysNational Scenic Byways Program
In the United States, from the Texas–New Mexico border to San Juan Pueblo north of Española, the original route (at one point designated U.S. Route 85 but later superseded with US Interstate Highways 10 and 25) has been designated a National Scenic Byway called El Camino Real.

Camino Real in New Mexico

Camino Real-Alamitos SectionCamino Real-Canon de las Bocas SectionCamino Real-Jornada Lakes Section
The Camino Real in New Mexico was the northern part of a historic roadway known as the Camino Real de Tierra Adentro that from 1598 ran from Mexico City northward through central and northern Mexico and the Trans-Pecos part of what is now Texas to San Juan Pueblo (Ohkay Owingeh) in Santa Fe de Nuevo Mexico, now the state of New Mexico.

Ojuelos de Jalisco

Ojuelos
1351-018: Historic set of Ojuelos de Jalisco.
The fortification of Ojuelos was one of the seven ones built at the request of the Viceroy Martín Enriquez de Almanza in the important route Mexico-Zacatecas which later became the Camino Real de Tierra Adentro.

U.S. Route 85

US 85U.S. Highway 85U.S. 85
In the United States, from the Texas–New Mexico border to San Juan Pueblo north of Española, the original route (at one point designated U.S. Route 85 but later superseded with US Interstate Highways 10 and 25) has been designated a National Scenic Byway called El Camino Real.
At one point, the route went along the historic El Camino Real.

Interstate 25

I-2525Interstate Highway 25
In the United States, from the Texas–New Mexico border to San Juan Pueblo north of Española, the original route (at one point designated U.S. Route 85 but later superseded with US Interstate Highways 10 and 25) has been designated a National Scenic Byway called El Camino Real.
From Las Cruces to Santa Fe I-25 follows the route of El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro.

Paraje

Along the trail, parajes (stopovers) that have been preserved today include El Rancho de las Golondrinas.

Aculco

Aculco De EspinozaAculco town
1351-002: Aculco town.
*Camino Real de Tierra Adentro

Sanctuary of Atotonilco

AtotonilcoSanctuary of Jesús Nazareno de AtotonilcoSanctuario de Jesús Nazareno de Atotonilco
1351-015: City of San Miguel de Allende and Sanctuario de Jesús Nazareno de Atotonilco.
*Camino Real de Tierra Adentro