Canadian Armed Forces

Badge of the Canadian Armed Forces
Uniforms of the Canadian militia in 1898. The Canadian Armed Forces traces its roots to the militia.
Soldiers of the 2nd Canadian Division behind a Mark II female tank during the Battle of Vimy Ridge
Two armourers of No. 440 Squadron RCAF, re-arming a Hawker Typhoon. By the end of the Second World War, Canada possessed the fourth-largest air force in the world.
Soldiers from the Canadian Grenadier Guards in Afghanistan. The Canadian Forces were in Afghanistan as a part of the NATO-led United Nations International Security Assistance Force until 2011.
Construction of a at Halifax Shipyard in 2018. The ship emerged from the Arctic Patrol Ship project.
A member of the Canadian Armed Forces briefs Vermont Army National Guard soldiers on the integration of women into the forces
The Armed Forces Council is the senior military body of the Canadian Forces. The Council typically operates from Pearkes building in Ottawa.
of the Royal Canadian Navy departs Pearl Harbor for the at-sea phase of RIMPAC 2014
Soldiers from Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry conducting an exercise during RIMPAC 2012
A Royal Canadian Air Force CF-18 Hornet over Iraq in support of Operation Impact
Members of the Canadian Special Operations Regiment during a freefall jump out of a USAF C-17 Globemaster III. The regiment is one of five units that make up CANSOFCOM.
A Canadian Rangers training camp in Alert, Nunavut. The Canadian Rangers are a sub-component of the Canadian Armed Forces reserve force.
Members of The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa, an infantry regiment of the Primary Reserve, march through Ottawa, Ontario
Operational dress uniforms for the three branches of the Canadian Armed Forces, shown here with naval rank insignia.
The Royal 22nd Regiment parading in full dress for the 400th anniversary of Quebec City. The Canadian Army's universal full dress includes a scarlet tunic, and midnight blue trousers.

Unified military of Canada, including sea, land, and air elements referred to as the Royal Canadian Navy, Canadian Army, and Royal Canadian Air Force.

- Canadian Armed Forces
Badge of the Canadian Armed Forces

500 related topics

Relevance

Chief of the Defence Staff (Canada)

The chief of the Defence Staff (CDS; chef d'état-major de la Défense; CEMD) is the professional head of the Canadian Armed Forces.

A meeting of the Cabinet of William Lyon Mackenzie King in 1930

Minister of National Defence (Canada)

Minister of the Crown in the Cabinet of Canada responsible for the management and direction of all matters relating to the national defence of Canada.

Minister of the Crown in the Cabinet of Canada responsible for the management and direction of all matters relating to the national defence of Canada.

A meeting of the Cabinet of William Lyon Mackenzie King in 1930

The Department of National Defence is headed by the deputy minister of national defence (the department's senior civil servant), while the Canadian Armed Forces are headed by the chief of the defence staff (the senior serving military officer).

Badge of the RCN

Royal Canadian Navy

Naval force of Canada.

Naval force of Canada.

Badge of the RCN
HMCS Québec, former HMS Uganda, was one of many ships commissioned by the RCN in the Second World War. Expanding substantially during the war, the RCN had become the world's fifth-largest navy by 1945.
Four F2H-3 Banshee fly overhead . Bonaventure was the last aircraft carrier in service with the RCN.
departing Halifax for the Persian Gulf as part of the Coalition forces. Canada deployed three ships in support of Operation Desert Shield, and later Operation Desert Storm
CFB Halifax serves as the headquarters for RCN units from Maritime Forces Atlantic.
CFB Esquimalt serves as the headquarters for RCN units from Maritime Forces Pacific.
, one of 12 multi-role frigates in service with RCN
A Royal Canadian Air Force CP-140 Aurora. The aircraft is used by the RCAF as a maritime patrol aircraft.
A CH-124 Sea King lowers a crewman onto the deck of USNS Yukon during RIMPAC 2012
Construction of at Halifax Shipyard in May 2018
A naval officer's commission with the Canadian Armed Forces
The Queen's Colour
The Halifax Memorial in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Dedicated to Canadian servicemen and women who died at sea during both World Wars.
The Montreal Clock Tower in Montreal, Quebec. Dedicated to Canadian sailors who died during the First World War.
The Royal Canadian Naval Association Naval Memorial in Burlington, Ontario. Commemorates members of the RCN and Canadian Merchant Navy that served in the Second World War.
The Royal Canadian Navy Monument in Ottawa, Ontario. Commemorates those who served, or are serving in the RCN.

The RCN is one of three environmental commands within the Canadian Armed Forces.

Badge of the Canadian Rangers

Canadian Rangers

Badge of the Canadian Rangers
Canadian Rangers with Lee–Enfield Rifle No. 4 rifles, 2011.
Tikka's T3 Compact Tactical rifle

The Canadian Rangers (Rangers canadiens) are a 5,000-strong sub-component of the Canadian Armed Forces reserve that provide a limited military presence in Canada's sparsely settled northern, coastal, and isolated areas where it would not be economically or practically viable to have conventional Army units.

Badge of the Canadian Army

Canadian Army

Badge of the Canadian Army
Various uniforms used by the Canadian militia, c. 1898
Canadian soldiers en route to South Africa in 1899
The National Defence Headquarters in Ottawa houses the headquarters for the Canadian Armed Forces, including the Commander of the Canadian Army.
Officer cadets of the Royal Military College of Canada during the 2009 Sandhurst Competition. The school is a degree-granting institution that trains officers for the Canadian Armed Forces.
A sign for 2 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group at the entrance to CFB Petawawa. The Mechanized Brigade Group is one of three maintained by the Regular Force.
The administration building at CFB Montreal, a Canadian Forces base used by the Canadian Army
Canadian Grenadier Guardsmen armed with C7 rifles in "arid region" CADPAT field uniforms. Behind them is an LAV III, an infantry fighting vehicle used by the Canadian Army.
An unpacked cabbage roll IMP. IMPs are issued to personnel when operating away from bases.
Members of the Royal 22e Regiment. The one undertaking public duties is wearing the regiment's full dress, while the other is wearing the Army's short-sleeved service dress.

The Canadian Army (Armée canadienne) is the command responsible for the operational readiness of the conventional ground forces of the Canadian Armed Forces.

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Capital and largest municipality in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, and the largest municipality in Atlantic Canada.

Capital and largest municipality in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, and the largest municipality in Atlantic Canada.

A map of Halifax's Community Planning Areas.
The Halifax Town Clock overlooks most of downtown Halifax.
Halifax Public Gardens is a Victorian era public garden that was designated as a National Historic Sites of Canada in 1984.
An elm tree in Halifax Public Gardens.
Urban, suburban, and rural divisions as defined by HRM planning department. The majority of Halifax is made up of rural areas.
View of Purdy's Wharf, an office complex in Downtown Halifax.
Halifax is home to the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, the largest art gallery in Atlantic Canada.
The Historic Properties are a collection of historical buildings on Halifax's boardwalk.
The community of Peggy's Cove is a major tourist attraction.
The Halifax Boardwalk is a public footpath along Halifax Harbour.
The Scotiabank Centre is the largest multi-purpose sporting arena in Atlantic Canada.
Headquarters of The Chronicle Herald, a daily newspaper published in Halifax
St. Paul's Church is the oldest church in Halifax. In the 2016 census, more than 71 percent of residents in Halifax claimed an affiliation with a Christian denomination.
The Halifax Shipyard of Irving Shipbuilding. Irving is a major employer in Halifax.
Halifax City Council is the seat of municipal government.
Halifax is home to Dalhousie University. Established in 1818, it is among the oldest English-language post-secondary institutions in Canada.
The Port of Halifax is North America's first inbound and last outbound shipping gateway to Europe.
Halifax, Nova Scotia, by Dominic Serres.

Major employers and economic generators include the Department of National Defence, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia Health Authority, Saint Mary's University, the Halifax Shipyard, various levels of government, and the Port of Halifax.

Knowledge of French in the European Union and candidate countries

National Defence Act

Knowledge of French in the European Union and candidate countries

The National Defence Act (NDA; French: Loi sur la défense nationale; LDN) is the primary enabling legislation for organizing and funding Canada's military.

Commander-in-Chief of the Canadian Armed Forces

Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada, in her role as Commander-in-Chief of the Canadian Militia and Naval and Air Forces, pictured with the crew of HMCS St. Laurent in Stockholm, Sweden, 11 June 1956
The banner of the Commander-in-Chief Unit Commendation

The commander-in-chief of the Canadian Armed Forces (Commandant en chef des Forces armées canadiennes) exercises supreme command and control over Canada's military, the Canadian Armed Forces.

Badge of the RCAF

Royal Canadian Air Force

Air and space force of Canada.

Air and space force of Canada.

Badge of the RCAF
Two armourers of No 440 Squadron RCAF re-arming a Hawker Typhoon in the Netherlands, 1944
An RCAF CIM-10 Bomarc missile on a launch erecter in North Bay. Viewed as an alternative to the scrapped Avro Arrow, the Bomarc's adoption was controversial given its nuclear payload.
An RCAF CF-18 Hornet during Operation Impact, 2015. CF-18s have been used by the RCAF since 1983.
1945–1946
1946–1965
Canadian Centennial
1965–current
Current

The RCAF is one of three environmental commands within the unified Canadian Armed Forces.

Reserve infantrymen train in urban operations (c. 2004)

Primary Reserve

Reserve infantrymen train in urban operations (c. 2004)
HMCS Brandon
Canadian Soldiers inspect Browning Hi-Power
Army Reservists conduct weapons training in drill hall
A LAV III during Operation Lotus.

The Primary Reserve of the Canadian Armed Forces (Première réserve des Forces canadiennes) is the first and largest of the four sub-components of the Canadian Armed Forces reserves, followed by the Supplementary Reserve, the Cadet Organizations Administration and Training Service (formerly the Cadet Instructors Cadre ) and the Canadian Rangers.