Canadian Bill of Rights

Bill of RightsBills of RightsCanadaconstitutional Canadian rightsSaskatchewan Bill of RightsThe Canadian Bill of Rights
The Canadian Bill of Rights (Déclaration canadienne des droits) is a federal statute and bill of rights enacted by the Parliament of Canada on August 10, 1960.wikipedia
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Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

Charter of Rights and FreedomsCharterCharter of Rights
These legal and constitutional limitations were a significant reason that the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms was established as an unambiguously-constitutional-level Bill of Rights for all Canadians, governing the application of both federal and provincial law in Canada, with the patriation of the Constitution of Canada in 1982.
The Charter was preceded by the Canadian Bill of Rights, which was enacted in 1960.

John Diefenbaker

DiefenbakerJohn George DiefenbakerJohn G. Diefenbaker
Saskatchewan's Bill of Rights is considered to have had a formative influence on John Diefenbaker, who was from Prince Albert, Saskatchewan.
During his six years as Prime Minister, his government obtained passage of the Canadian Bill of Rights and granted the vote to the First Nations and Inuit peoples.

Quasi-constitutionality

quasi-constitutionalquasi-constitutional legislation
While the Bill of Rights is considered only quasi-constitutional because it was enacted as an ordinary Act of the Parliament of Canada, it contains the following provision:
At the federal level, such laws include the Canadian Bill of Rights and the Official Languages Act. In Quebec, the Charter of the French Language and the Quebec Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms contain primacy clauses asserting quasi-constitutional status.

Section 2 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

section 2section 2(b)section 2(a)
However, many of its rights have roots in Canada in the 1960 Canadian Bill of Rights (although this law was of limited effectiveness), and in traditions under a theorized Implied Bill of Rights.

Section 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

section 15Section Fifteen of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedomssection 15(1)
The Canadian Bill of Rights of 1960 had guaranteed the "right of the individual to equality before the law and the protection of the law."

Fundamental justice

principles of fundamental justiceprinciple of fundamental justicedoctrine of vagueness
The term is used in the Canadian Bill of Rights and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and also the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

Canada (AG) v Lavell

Attorney General of Canada v. LavellJeannette Lavell
Disappointments for those who wanted courts to enforce rights vigorously included Bliss v. Canada and Attorney General of Canada v. Lavell.
Canada (AG) v Lavell, [1974] S.C.R. 1349, was a landmark 5–4 Supreme Court of Canada decision holding that Section 12(1)(b) of the Indian Act did not violate the respondents' right to "equality before the law" under Section 1 (b) of the Canadian Bill of Rights.

Section 7 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

section 7sections 7section seven
Since patriation, its usefulness at federal law in Canada is mostly limited to issues pertaining to the enjoyment of property, as set forth in its section 1(a)]—a slightly-broader "life, liberty, and security of the person" right than is recognized in section seven of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
In Canada before the Charter, the Canadian Bill of Rights contained rights to life, liberty and security of the person, but all these other laws limit those rights through due process rather than fundamental justice.

Constitution of Canada

Canadian ConstitutionConstitutionconstitutional
These legal and constitutional limitations were a significant reason that the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms was established as an unambiguously-constitutional-level Bill of Rights for all Canadians, governing the application of both federal and provincial law in Canada, with the patriation of the Constitution of Canada in 1982.

Bliss v Canada (AG)

Bliss v. CanadaBliss v. Attorney General of Canada
Disappointments for those who wanted courts to enforce rights vigorously included Bliss v. Canada and Attorney General of Canada v. Lavell.
Bliss v Canada (AG) [1979] 1 S.C.R. 183 is a famous Supreme Court of Canada decision on equality rights for women under the Canadian Bill of Rights.

R v Drybones

R. v. DrybonesDrybones
A notable exception was R. v. Drybones.
R v Drybones, [1970] S.C.R. 282, is a landmark 6-3 Supreme Court of Canada decision holding that the Canadian Bill of Rights "empowered the courts to strike down federal legislation which offended its dictates."

Security of person

security of the personpersonal securitycitizen security
The right to security of the person was recognized in Canada in the Canadian Bill of Rights in 1960.

Section 33 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

notwithstanding clausesection 33Section Thirty-three of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
The notwithstanding wording of section 2 is a precursor to the notwithstanding clause of the Charter.
The presence of the clause makes the Charter similar to the Canadian Bill of Rights (1960), which, under section 2, states that "an Act of the Parliament" may declare that a law "shall operate notwithstanding the Canadian Bill of Rights".

New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990

New Zealand Bill of Rights ActBill of Rights ActNew Zealand Bill of Rights
In its current form, the Bill of Rights is similar to the Canadian Bill of Rights, passed in 1960.

Section 10 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

section 10(b)section 10Section Ten
Although the right to counsel itself could be found in the 1960 Canadian Bill of Rights, the right to be told that one may see counsel is new to Canadian bills of rights.

Human rights in Canada

civil rightshuman rightsCanadian values
In 1960, by then the Prime Minister of Canada, Diefenbaker introduced the Canadian Bill of Rights.

Bill of rights

Principles of the Bill of RightsBills of Rightsdeclaration of rights
The Canadian Bill of Rights (Déclaration canadienne des droits) is a federal statute and bill of rights enacted by the Parliament of Canada on August 10, 1960.

Parliament of Canada

ParliamentCanadian ParliamentMP
The Canadian Bill of Rights (Déclaration canadienne des droits) is a federal statute and bill of rights enacted by the Parliament of Canada on August 10, 1960.

Canadians

CanadianCanadian citizensCanada
It provides Canadians with certain rights at Canadian federal law in relation to other federal statutes.

Implied Bill of Rights

It was the earliest expression of human rights law at the federal level in Canada, though an implied Bill of Rights had already been recognized in the Canadian Common Law.

Patriation

patriatepatriatedpatriating
These legal and constitutional limitations were a significant reason that the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms was established as an unambiguously-constitutional-level Bill of Rights for all Canadians, governing the application of both federal and provincial law in Canada, with the patriation of the Constitution of Canada in 1982.

Saskatchewan

SKSaskatchewan, CanadaProvince of Saskatchewan
In 1947, Saskatchewan passed into law a bill of rights which covered both fundamental freedoms and equality rights.

Prince Albert, Saskatchewan

Prince AlbertPrince Albert, SKIsbister's Settlement
Saskatchewan's Bill of Rights is considered to have had a formative influence on John Diefenbaker, who was from Prince Albert, Saskatchewan.