Canadian English

EnglishCanadianCanadaEnglish languageEnglish-languageCanadian accentCanEBritish Columbia EnglishCanadian spellingaccent
Canadian English (CanE, CE, en-CA) is the set of varieties of the English language native to Canada.wikipedia
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North American English

North AmericanEnglishNorth America
Phonologically, Canadian and American English are classified together as North American English, emphasizing the fact that the vast majority of outsiders, even other native English speakers, cannot distinguish the typical accents of the two countries by sound alone.
Because of their related histories and cultures and the similarities between the pronunciation, vocabulary, and accent of American English and Canadian English, the two spoken varieties are often grouped together under a single category.

Canadian French

FrenchFrench-languageFrench (Canada)
According to the 2011 census, English was the first language of approximately 19 million Canadians, or 57% of the population; the remainder of the population were native speakers of Canadian French (22%) or other languages (allophones, 21%).
At the federal level, it has official status alongside English.

Governor General of Canada

Governor GeneralGovernor-General of CanadaGovernor-General
Canada's first prime minister, John A. Macdonald, once advised the Governor General of Canada to issue an order-in-council directing that government papers be written in the British style.
Beginning in 1959, it has also been traditional to rotate between anglophone and francophone officeholders—although many recent governors general have been bilingual.

Mid-Atlantic accent

transatlantic accentMid-Atlantic EnglishLocust Valley lockjaw
Treated as a marker of upper-class prestige in the 19th and early 20th centuries, Canadian dainty was marked by the use of some features of British English pronunciation, resulting in an accent similar to the Mid-Atlantic accent known in the United States.
A similar accent, known as Canadian dainty, was also known in Canada in the same era, although it resulted from different historical processes.

Canadian Shift

Canadian Vowel ShiftCanadian/California Vowel Shiftvowel shift
There are minor disagreements over the degree to which even Canadians and Americans themselves can differentiate their own two accents, and there is even evidence that some Western American English (Pacific Northwest and California English, for example) is undergoing a vowel shift partially coinciding with a vowel shift occurring in mainland Canadian English, first reported in the early 1990s.
The Canadian Shift is a chain shift of vowel sounds found primarily in Canadian English and younger Western American English (first and notably documented in California English), Pacific Northwest English, and some of Western New England English and Midland American English.

Quebec French

FrenchQuébécoisQuebec
Of Canadians outside the province of Quebec, 82% reported speaking English natively, but within Quebec the figure was just 7.7% as most of its residents are native speakers of Quebec French.
As a result, Quebec French began to borrow from both Canadian and American English to fill accidental gaps in the lexical fields of government, law, manufacturing, business and trade.

Standard Canadian English

Standard CanadaWest/Central Canadian English
Standard Canadian English is socially defined.
Standard Canadian English is the greatly homogeneous variety of Canadian English spoken particularly all across central and western Canada, as well as throughout Canada among urban middle-class speakers from English-speaking families, excluding the regional dialects of Atlantic Canadian English.

Northern American English

NorthernNorthNew England dialects
The first large wave of permanent English-speaking settlement in Canada, and linguistically the most important, was the influx of Loyalists fleeing the American Revolution, chiefly from the Mid-Atlantic States—as such, Canadian English is believed by some scholars to have derived from northern American English.
Canadian English is believed to have originated from Northern American English, or to simply be a variety of it.

Canadian Oxford Dictionary

Many Canadian editors, though, use the Canadian Oxford Dictionary, often along with the chapter on spelling in Editing Canadian English, and, where necessary (depending on context), one or more other references.
The Canadian Oxford Dictionary is a dictionary of Canadian English.

Ottawa Valley English

Ottawa Valley Twang
A linguistic enclave has also formed in the Ottawa Valley, heavily influenced by original Scottish, Irish, and German settlers, and existing along the Ontario-Quebec boundary, which has its own distinct accent known as the Ottawa Valley twang (or brogue).
Ottawa Valley English is Canadian English of the Ottawa Valley, particularly in reference to the historical local varieties of the area, now largely in decline.

Dictionary of Canadianisms on Historical Principles 2

DCHP''-2
On 17 March 2017 a second edition of DCHP, the online Dictionary of Canadianisms on Historical Principles 2 (DCHP-2), was published.
The Dictionary of Canadianisms on Historical Principles Second Edition (DCHP-2) is a historical dictionary of words, phrases, and expressions that are characteristic of Canadian English (CanE).

Canadian raising

abootAbootmanaccentuated Canadian accent
Canadian raising (found in words such as "about" and "writer") is less prominent in B.C. than other parts of the country and is on the decline further, with many speakers not raising before voiceless consonants. Canadian raising is quite strong throughout the province of Ontario, except within the Ottawa Valley.
Canadian English often has raising in words with both (height, life, psych, type, etc.) and (clout, house, south, scout, etc.), while a number of U.S. English dialects (such as Inland North and Western New England) have this feature in but not.

Atlantic Canadian English

Maritimer EnglishCape Breton accentCape Breton English
Atlantic Canadian English is a class of Canadian English dialects spoken in the Atlantic provinces of Canada and is notably distinct from Standard Canadian English.

Gage Canadian Dictionary

The Star had always avoided using recognized Canadian spelling, citing the Gage Canadian Dictionary in their defence.
The Gage Canadian Dictionary ISBN: 0771519818 is a dictionary for Canadian English published by Gage Publishers in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Government of Canada

Canadian governmentfederal governmentfederal
The Government of Canada only recommends writing all-numeric dates in the form of YYYY-MM-DD (e.g. 2017-07-01), following ISO 8601.
In Canadian English, the term can mean either the collective set of institutions or specifically the Queen-in-Council.

Ontario

Ontario, CanadaONProvince of Ontario
Canadian raising is quite strong throughout the province of Ontario, except within the Ottawa Valley.
A political stalemate between the French- and English-speaking legislators, as well as fear of aggression from the United States during and immediately after the American Civil War, led the political elite to hold a series of conferences in the 1860s to effect a broader federal union of all British North American colonies.

Dialect

dialectsregiolectdialectal
The dialect spoken in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, an autonomous dominion until 31 March 1949, is often considered the most distinctive Canadian English dialect.
For example, Standard American English, Standard British English, Standard Canadian English, Standard Indian English, Standard Australian English, and Standard Philippine English may all be said to be standard dialects of the English language.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
Canadian English (CanE, CE, en-CA) is the set of varieties of the English language native to Canada.
Countries such as Canada, Australia, Ireland, New Zealand and South Africa have their own standard varieties which are less often used as standards for education internationally.

A Dictionary of Canadianisms on Historical Principles

Dictionary of Canadianisms on Historical PrinciplesA Dictionary of Canadianisms on Historical Principles: Dictionary of Canadian EnglishDCHP-1
An exception has been in the area of lexis, where Avis et al. 's 1967 Dictionary of Canadianisms on Historical Principles offered real-time historical data through its quotations.
W. J. Gage Publishers, the leading dictionary publisher for Canadian English (CanE) dictionaries at the time, contributed to the project (P.

Gage Educational Publishing Company

GageGage Canadian DictionaryGage Publishing
The first Canadian dictionaries of Canadian English were edited by Walter Spencer Avis and published by Gage Ltd. The Beginner's Dictionary (1962), the Intermediate Dictionary (1964) and, finally, the Senior Dictionary (1967) were milestones in Canadian English lexicography.
The Gage senior-level dictionary, as of 1983 called the Gage Canadian Dictionary was often considered the official dictionary of Canadian English.

Western American English

WestWesternWestern U.S. accents
There are minor disagreements over the degree to which even Canadians and Americans themselves can differentiate their own two accents, and there is even evidence that some Western American English (Pacific Northwest and California English, for example) is undergoing a vowel shift partially coinciding with a vowel shift occurring in mainland Canadian English, first reported in the early 1990s.
This front-vowel lowering is also reported around Portland, Oregon, the hub of a unique Northwestern variety of American English that demonstrates other similarities with Canadian English.

Diphthong

diphthongsfalling diphthonggliding vowel
In Greater Toronto, the diphthong tends to be fronted (as a result the word about is pronounced as or 'a-beh-oot').

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
Canadian English (CanE, CE, en-CA) is the set of varieties of the English language native to Canada.
A multitude of languages are used by Canadians, with English and French (the official languages) being the mother tongues of approximately 56 percent and 21 percent of Canadians, respectively.

Canadians

CanadianCanadian citizensCanada
According to the 2011 census, English was the first language of approximately 19 million Canadians, or 57% of the population; the remainder of the population were native speakers of Canadian French (22%) or other languages (allophones, 21%).
A multitude of languages are used by Canadians, with English and French (the official languages) being the mother tongues of approximately 56% and 21% of Canadians, respectively.

Pacific Northwest English

Pacific NorthwestNorthwestlocal use
There are minor disagreements over the degree to which even Canadians and Americans themselves can differentiate their own two accents, and there is even evidence that some Western American English (Pacific Northwest and California English, for example) is undergoing a vowel shift partially coinciding with a vowel shift occurring in mainland Canadian English, first reported in the early 1990s.