Canadian French

FrenchFrench-languageFrench (Canada) CanadianFrFrench (Canada)French languageFrench-speakingfrancophonesCanada
Canadian French (français canadien) is a variety of the French language spoken in Canada.wikipedia
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Quebec French

FrenchQuébécoisQuebec
It includes the varieties of French used in Canada such as Quebec French.
Canadian French is a frequently used umbrella term for the varieties of French used in Canada including Quebec French.

Acadian French

AcadianFrenchdialect
Formerly Canadian French referred solely to Quebec French and the closely related varieties of Ontario (Franco-Ontarian) and Western Canada—in contrast with Acadian French, which is spoken in some areas of eastern Quebec, New Brunswick (including the Chiac dialect), and some areas of Nova Scotia (including the dialect St. Marys Bay French).
Acadian French (français acadien) is a variety of Canadian French originally associated with the Acadians of what is now the Maritimes in Canada.

Canadian English

EnglishCanadianCanada
At the federal level, it has official status alongside English.
According to the 2011 census, English was the first language of approximately 19 million Canadians, or 57% of the population; the remainder of the population were native speakers of Canadian French (22%) or other languages (allophones, 21%).

New England French

New Englanddialect of Frenchthe largest French-speaking population
New England French (a dialect spoken in northern New England) is essentially a variety of Canadian French and exhibits no particular differences from the Canadian dialects, unlike Louisiana French and Louisiana Creole.
New England French (français de Nouvelle-Angleterre) is a variety of Canadian French spoken in the New England region of the United States.

Louisiana French

Cajun FrenchCajunColonial French
New England French (a dialect spoken in northern New England) is essentially a variety of Canadian French and exhibits no particular differences from the Canadian dialects, unlike Louisiana French and Louisiana Creole. Essentially a local variant of Quebec French, it is one of three major forms of French that developed in what is now the United States, the others being Louisiana French and the nearly-extinct Missouri French.
Over the centuries, the language has incorporated some words of African, Spanish, Native American and English origin, sometimes giving it linguistic features found only in Louisiana, Louisiana French differs to varying extents from French dialects spoken in other regions, but Louisiana French is mutually intelligible with all other dialects and particularly with those of Missouri, New England, Canada and northwestern France.

Franco-Ontarian

Franco-OntariansFrenchFrancophone
Formerly Canadian French referred solely to Quebec French and the closely related varieties of Ontario (Franco-Ontarian) and Western Canada—in contrast with Acadian French, which is spoken in some areas of eastern Quebec, New Brunswick (including the Chiac dialect), and some areas of Nova Scotia (including the dialect St. Marys Bay French).
The dialects of French spoken in Ontario are similar to, but distinct from, Quebec French and constitute part of the greater Canadian French dialect.

Varieties of French

French dialectFrench for South-East Asiaregional dialects of French
It includes the varieties of French used in Canada such as Quebec French.
New England French is the local name for Canadian French as it is spoken in New England, except in the Saint John Valley of northern Aroostook County, Maine, where Acadian French predominates.

Ontario

Ontario, CanadaONProvince of Ontario
Government services are offered in French at select localities in Manitoba and Ontario (through the French Language Services Act) and, to a lesser extent, elsewhere in the country, depending largely on the proximity to Quebec and/or French Canadian influence on any given region.
A political stalemate between the French- and English-speaking legislators, as well as fear of aggression from the United States during and immediately after the American Civil War, led the political elite to hold a series of conferences in the 1860s to effect a broader federal union of all British North American colonies.

First Nations

First NationNorth American IndianIndian
Métis French is spoken in Manitoba and Western Canada by the Métis, descendants of First Nations mothers and voyageur fathers during the fur trade.
The parallel term "Native Canadian" is not commonly used, but "Native" (in English) and "autochtone" (in Canadian French; from the Greek, own, and, land) are.

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
Canadian French (français canadien) is a variety of the French language spoken in Canada.
New England French, essentially a variant of Canadian French, is spoken in parts of New England.

Northwest Territories

North-West TerritoriesNTNorth West Territories
At the provincial level, French is the sole official language of Quebec as well as one of two official languages of New Brunswick, and jointly official (derived from its federal legal status) in Nunavut, Yukon, and the Northwest Territories.

French language in Canada

FrenchfrancophoneFrancophone Canada
French is the mother tongue of about 7.2 million Canadians (20.6 per cent of the Canadian population, second to English at 56 per cent) according to Census Canada 2016.

Newfoundland French

FrenchFrancophonesNewfoundland
PEI and Newfoundland & Labrador have Newfoundland French.

Métis French

a variation of FrenchMetis French
Métis French is spoken in Manitoba and Western Canada by the Métis, descendants of First Nations mothers and voyageur fathers during the fur trade.
They share a common phonology and morphosyntax for the noun phrase but differ as to their sources for the verb phrase which is Ojibwe-Cree based in Michif, French-based in Métis French.

Chiac

Chiac languageChiaque Language
Formerly Canadian French referred solely to Quebec French and the closely related varieties of Ontario (Franco-Ontarian) and Western Canada—in contrast with Acadian French, which is spoken in some areas of eastern Quebec, New Brunswick (including the Chiac dialect), and some areas of Nova Scotia (including the dialect St. Marys Bay French).

Languages of Canada

Aboriginal languagesCanadianindigenous language
According to the 2011 census, English and French are the mother tongues of 56.9% and 21.3% of Canadians respectively.

Michif

Michif languagecrgFrench Cree
Many Métis spoke Cree in addition to French, and over the years they developed a unique mixed language called Michif by combining Métis French nouns, numerals, articles and adjectives with Cree verbs, demonstratives, postpositions, interrogatives and pronouns.
Michif combines Cree and Métis French (Rhodes 1977, Bakker 1997:85), a variety of Canadian French, with some additional borrowing from English and indigenous languages of the Americas such as Ojibwe and Assiniboine.

Yukon

Yukon TerritoryYKYT
At the provincial level, French is the sole official language of Quebec as well as one of two official languages of New Brunswick, and jointly official (derived from its federal legal status) in Nunavut, Yukon, and the Northwest Territories.

Little Canada

Little Canadasemigrant communitiesle petit Canada
A variant of Canadian French known as New England French is still spoken in parts of New England.

Métis in Canada

MétisMetisMétis people
Métis French is spoken in Manitoba and Western Canada by the Métis, descendants of First Nations mothers and voyageur fathers during the fur trade.
The Métis today predominantly speak Canadian English, with Canadian French a strong second language, as well as numerous Aboriginal tongues.

French language in the United States

FrenchFrench in the United StatesAmerican
There are three major groups of French dialects that emerged in what is now the United States: Louisiana French, Missouri French, and New England French (essentially a variant of Canadian French).

Joual

Liftslang
Joual is an informal variety of French spoken in working-class neighbourhoods in Quebec.

Franglais

Cockney-Frenchcrept back into the French languageFranglish
Canadian French is French as it is spoken in Canada.

Missouri French

Illinois Country Frenchlanguage of MissouriMissouri
Essentially a local variant of Quebec French, it is one of three major forms of French that developed in what is now the United States, the others being Louisiana French and the nearly-extinct Missouri French.