Canadian Pacific Railway

CPRCanadian PacificCPCP RailC.P.RCanadian Pacific Railway (CPR)C.P.R.transcontinental railwayCanadian Pacific Railway CompanyCanadian Pacific Railway CPR
The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), also known formerly as CP Rail between 1968 and 1996, is a historic Canadian Class I railroad incorporated in 1881.wikipedia
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Vancouver

Vancouver, British ColumbiaVancouver, BCVancouver, Canada
Headquartered in Calgary, Alberta, it owns approximately 12500 mi of track all across Canada and into the United States, stretching from Montreal to Vancouver, and as far north as Edmonton.
As part of the land and political deal whereby the area of the townsite was made the railhead of the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), it was renamed "Vancouver" and incorporated shortly thereafter as a city, in 1886.

Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern Railroad

Dakota, Minnesota and EasternDM&EDM&E Railroad
The company acquired two American lines in 2009: the Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern Railroad and the Iowa, Chicago and Eastern Railroad.
The Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern Railroad is a Class II railroad subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific Railway operating across South Dakota and southern Minnesota in the Northern Plains of the United States.

Via Rail

Via Rail CanadaViaCanadian Railways
Its primary passenger services were eliminated in 1986, after being assumed by Via Rail Canada in 1978.
Via Rail operates 514 trains per week across eight Canadian provinces and 12500 km of track, 98% of which is owned and maintained by other railway companies, mostly by Canadian National Railway (CN) and Canadian Pacific Railway (CP).

Edmonton

Edmonton, AlbertaEdmonton, ABCity of Edmonton
Headquartered in Calgary, Alberta, it owns approximately 12500 mi of track all across Canada and into the United States, stretching from Montreal to Vancouver, and as far north as Edmonton.
The coming of the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) to southern Alberta in 1885 helped the Edmonton economy, and the 1891 building of the Calgary and Edmonton (C&E) Railway resulted in the emergence of a railway townsite (South Edmonton/Strathcona) on the river's south side, across from Edmonton.

Soo Line Railroad

Soo LineSOOMinneapolis St Paul and Sault Ste Marie Railway
The trackage of the IC&E was at one time part of CP subsidiary Soo Line and predecessor line The Milwaukee Road.
The Soo Line Railroad is the primary United States railroad subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific Railway, one of seven U.S. Class I railroads, controlled through the Soo Line Corporation.

Iowa, Chicago and Eastern Railroad

Chicago & Iowa RailroadICEICER
The company acquired two American lines in 2009: the Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern Railroad and the Iowa, Chicago and Eastern Railroad.
It has been controlled by the Canadian Pacific Railway and operated as a part of its system since October 30, 2008.

John A. Macdonald

Sir John A. MacdonaldMacdonaldPrime Minister Macdonald
Together with the Canadian Confederation, the creation of the Canadian Pacific Railway was a task originally undertaken as the National Dream by the Conservative government of Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald (1st Canadian Ministry).
In 1873, he resigned from office over the Pacific Scandal, in which his party took bribes from businessmen seeking the contract to build the Canadian Pacific Railway.

Richard B. Angus

R.B. AngusAngusR. B. Angus
The Montreal-based syndicate officially comprised five men: George Stephen, James J. Hill, Duncan McIntyre, Richard B. Angus and John Stewart Kennedy.
He was a co-founder and vice-president of the Canadian Pacific Railway; President of the Bank of Montreal; President of the Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal; President of the Montreal Art Association and co-founder and President of the Mount Royal Club.

George Stephen, 1st Baron Mount Stephen

George StephenLord Mount StephenMount Stephen
The Montreal-based syndicate officially comprised five men: George Stephen, James J. Hill, Duncan McIntyre, Richard B. Angus and John Stewart Kennedy.
He was the financial genius behind the creation of the Canadian Pacific Railway.

Conservative Party of Canada (1867–1942)

ConservativeConservative PartyNational Government
Together with the Canadian Confederation, the creation of the Canadian Pacific Railway was a task originally undertaken as the National Dream by the Conservative government of Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald (1st Canadian Ministry).
One major accomplishment of Macdonald's first government was the creation of the Canadian Pacific Railway which also led to the Pacific Scandal that brought down the government in 1873.

Canadian Pacific Limited

Canadian PacificCanadian Pacific Railway CompanyCanadian Pacific Forest Products
On 15 February 1881, legislation confirming the contract received royal assent, and the Canadian Pacific Railway Company was formally incorporated the next day.
Canadian Pacific Limited was created in 1971 to own properties formerly owned by Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), a transportation and mining giant in Canada.

Donald Smith, 1st Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal

Donald SmithLord StrathconaDonald Alexander Smith
A beaver was chosen as the railway's logo in honor of Sir Donald A Smith (1st. Donald A. Smith and Norman Kittson were unofficial silent partners with a significant financial interest.
He was president of the Bank of Montreal and with his first cousin, Lord Mount Stephen, co-founded the Canadian Pacific Railway.

Kamloops

Kamloops, British ColumbiaKamloops, BCKamloops, Canada
Macdonald confirmed that Port Moody would be the terminus of the transcontinental railway, and announced that the railway would follow the Fraser and Thompson rivers between Port Moody and Kamloops.
The gold rush of the 1860s and the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway, which reached Kamloops from the West in 1883, brought further growth, resulting in the City of Kamloops being incorporated in 1893 with a population of about 500.

Andrew Onderdonk

The contract was awarded to Andrew Onderdonk, whose men started work on 15 May 1880.
Andrew Onderdonk (30 August 1848 – 21 June 1905) was an American construction contractor who worked on several major projects in the West, including the San Francisco seawall in California and the Canadian Pacific Railway in British Columbia.

Sandford Fleming

Sir Sandford FlemingSanford Fleming
The new Liberal prime minister, Alexander Mackenzie, ordered construction of segments of the railway as a public enterprise under the supervision of the Department of Public Works led by Sandford Fleming.
He designed Canada's first postage stamp, left a huge body of surveying and map making, engineered much of the Intercolonial Railway and the Canadian Pacific Railway, and was a founding member of the Royal Society of Canada and founder of the Canadian Institute, a science organization in Toronto.

Thompson River

ThompsonThompson CanyonNorth Thompson River
Macdonald confirmed that Port Moody would be the terminus of the transcontinental railway, and announced that the railway would follow the Fraser and Thompson rivers between Port Moody and Kamloops.
Highway 1, the Trans-Canada Highway and the mainline of the Canadian Pacific Railway parallel the river.

Winnipeg

Winnipeg, ManitobaWinnipeg, MBCity of Winnipeg
The Thunder Bay section linking Lake Superior to Winnipeg was commenced in 1875.
Winnipeg developed rapidly after the coming of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1881.

Norman Kittson

Kittson, Norman WolfredCommodore Norman KittsonKittson, Norman
Donald A. Smith and Norman Kittson were unofficial silent partners with a significant financial interest.
He was part of the original syndicate that went on to create the Canadian Pacific Railway.

Field Hill

However, the CPR quickly discarded this plan in favour of a more southerly route across the arid Palliser's Triangle in Saskatchewan and via Kicking Horse Pass and down the Field Hill to the Rocky Mountain Trench.
Field Hill is a steep portion of the mainline of the Canadian Pacific Railway located near Field, British Columbia.

Duncan McIntyre (businessman)

Duncan McIntyre
The Montreal-based syndicate officially comprised five men: George Stephen, James J. Hill, Duncan McIntyre, Richard B. Angus and John Stewart Kennedy.
Duncan McIntyre (23 December 1834 – 13 June 1894) was a Scots-Quebecer businessman from Callander noted for his participation in the Canadian Pacific Railway syndicate of 1880 and as a founder of the Bell Telephone Company of Canada.

Big Hill

Spiral TunnelsBig Hill Spiral TunnelsThe Big Hill
This section of track was the CPR's Big Hill.
The Big Hill on the Canadian Pacific Railway main line in British Columbia, Canada, was the most difficult piece of railway track on the Canadian Pacific Railway's route.

Pacific Scandal

corruption in railway contractsscandals
In 1873, Sir John A. Macdonald and other high-ranking politicians, bribed in the Pacific Scandal, granted federal contracts to Hugh Allan's Canada Pacific Railway Company (which was unrelated to the current company) rather than to David Lewis Macpherson's Inter-Ocean Railway Company which was thought to have connections to the American Northern Pacific Railway Company.
An entirely different operation later built the Canadian Pacific Railway railway to the Pacific.

North Western Coal and Navigation Company

Alberta Railway and Coal CompanyAlberta Railway and Irrigation CompanyAlberta Coal and Railway Co.
He was helped by Sir Alexander Tilloch Galt, who was the owner of the North Western Coal and Navigation Company.
NWC&NC contracted Canadian Pacific Railway to buy a minimum of 20,000 tons of coal a year for five years at $5 a ton delivered to Medicine Hat.

Savona, British Columbia

SavonaSavona's FerrySavona, B.C.
In 1879, the federal government floated bonds in London and called for tenders to construct the 206 km section of the railway from Yale, British Columbia, to Savona's Ferry, on Kamloops Lake.
It was a stagecoach stop, the location of a ferry across the Thompson River, and later moved to take advantage of the Canadian Pacific Railway built on the south side of the river.

Rogers Pass (British Columbia)

Rogers PassRoger's PassRogers
He discovered the pass in April 1881 and, true to its word, the CPR named it "Rogers Pass" and gave him the cheque.
Rogers Pass (elevation 1,330 m) is a high mountain pass through the Selkirk Mountains of British Columbia used by the Canadian Pacific Railway and the Trans-Canada Highway.