Canadian Rockies

Rocky MountainsRockiesCanadian Rocky MountainsNorthern RockiesThe Rockies41 Canadian RockiesCanadianCanadian AlpsCanadian portion of the Rocky MountainsCanadian Rocky Mountain
The Canadian Rockies (Rocheuses canadiennes) or Canadian Rocky Mountains comprise the Canadian segment of the North American Rocky Mountains.wikipedia
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Rocky Mountains

RockiesRocky MountainRocky
The Canadian Rockies (Rocheuses canadiennes) or Canadian Rocky Mountains comprise the Canadian segment of the North American Rocky Mountains.
Mount Robson in British Columbia, at 12972 ft, is the highest peak in the Canadian Rockies.

North American Cordillera

Western CordilleraLaramide BeltCordillera
They are the eastern part of the Canadian Cordillera, which is a system of multiple ranges of mountains which runs from the Canadian Prairies to the Pacific Coast. The Canadian Rockies are the easternmost part of the Canadian Cordillera, the collective name for the mountains of Western Canada.
The western system includes the Coast Mountains, the interior system includes the Columbia Mountains, and the eastern system includes the Canadian Rockies.

British Columbia

BCB.C.British Columbia, Canada
The Canadian Rockies mountain system comprises the southeastern part of this system, lying between the Interior Plains of Alberta and Northeastern British Columbia on the east to the Rocky Mountain Trench of BC on the west.
The northern, mostly mountainous, two-thirds of the province is largely unpopulated and undeveloped, except for the area east of the Rockies, where the Peace River Country contains BC's portion of the Canadian Prairies, centred at the city of Dawson Creek.

Mount Robson

Mt. Robsonsecond highestthe same
The Canadian Rockies have numerous high peaks and ranges, such as Mount Robson (3954 m) and Mount Columbia (3747 m). The Canadian Rockies are composed of shale and limestone.
Mount Robson is the most prominent mountain in North America's Rocky Mountain range; it is also the highest point in the Canadian Rockies.

Canada

🇨🇦CanadianCAN
The Canadian Rockies (Rocheuses canadiennes) or Canadian Rocky Mountains comprise the Canadian segment of the North American Rocky Mountains.
There are also fresh-water glaciers in the Canadian Rockies and the Coast Mountains.

Mount Columbia (Canada)

Mount ColumbiaMt. Columbia
The Canadian Rockies have numerous high peaks and ranges, such as Mount Robson (3954 m) and Mount Columbia (3747 m). The Canadian Rockies are composed of shale and limestone.
It is second only to Mount Robson for height and topographical prominence in the Canadian Rockies.

Marias Pass

In geographic terms the boundary is at the Canada/US border, but in geological terms it might be considered to be at Marias Pass in northern Montana.
The pass forms the southern limit of the Continental Ranges, a major grouping of the Rocky Mountains which extends as far north as McGregor Pass in the Northern Rockies of the Canadian province of British Columbia.

Columbia Icefield

Columbia
There is a non-technical route to the top involving only kicking steps in the snow, but the approach is across the Columbia Icefield and requires glacier travel and crevasse rescue knowledge.
Located in the Canadian Rockies astride the Continental Divide along the border of British Columbia and Alberta, Canada, the ice field lies partly in the northwestern tip of Banff National Park and partly in the southern end of Jasper National Park.

Yellowhead Pass

Yellowheadbear his name
However, Mount Robson is particularly impressive because it stands out on the continental divide towering over Yellowhead Pass, one of the lowest passes in the Canadian Rockies, and is close to the Yellowhead Highway.
The Yellowhead Pass is a mountain pass across the Continental Divide of the Americas in the Canadian Rockies.

Alberta

ABAlberta, CanadaALB
The Canadian Rockies mountain system comprises the southeastern part of this system, lying between the Interior Plains of Alberta and Northeastern British Columbia on the east to the Rocky Mountain Trench of BC on the west.
Banff, Jasper and the Rocky Mountains are visited by about three million people per year.

Mount Temple (Alberta)

Mount TempleTempleMt. Temple
Of the highest peaks, only Mount Temple (3543 m) has an established scrambling route.
Mount Temple is a mountain in Banff National Park of the Canadian Rockies of Alberta, Canada.

Western Canada

Western CanadianWesternwestern provinces
The Canadian Rockies are the easternmost part of the Canadian Cordillera, the collective name for the mountains of Western Canada.
The Canadian Rockies are part of a major continental divide that extends north and south through western North America and western South America.

Yellowhead Highway

YellowheadProvincial Highway 16PTH 16
However, Mount Robson is particularly impressive because it stands out on the continental divide towering over Yellowhead Pass, one of the lowest passes in the Canadian Rockies, and is close to the Yellowhead Highway.
The highway is named for the Yellowhead Pass, the route chosen to cross the Canadian Rockies.

Alpine Club of Canada

ACC
According to the Alpine Club of Canada, more people have died on Mount Temple than any other Canadian mountain, including seven youths in an unsupervised American school group in 1955.
Byron Harmon, whose 6500+ photographs of the Canadian Rockies in the early 20th century provide the best glimpse of the area at that time, was official photographer to the club at its founding.

Mount Kitchener

Mount K2Kitchener
From the same high camp as for Mount Columbia, it is possible to ascend a number of other high peaks in the area, including North Twin, South Twin, Mount Kitchener, Mount Stutfield and Snow Dome.
Mount Kitchener is a mountain located within the Columbia Icefield of Jasper National Park, which is part of the Canadian Rockies.

Park Ranges

ParkPark mountain ranges
The Canadian Rockies are subdivided into numerous mountain ranges, structured in two main groupings, the Continental Ranges, which has three main subdivisions, the Front Range, Park Ranges and Kootenay Ranges, and the Northern Rockies which comprise two main groupings, the Hart Ranges and the Muskwa Ranges.
The Park Ranges, also known as the Main Ranges, are a group of mountain ranges in the Canadian Rockies of eastern British Columbia and western Alberta, Canada.

North Twin Peak

North TwinTwin Peaks massif
From the same high camp as for Mount Columbia, it is possible to ascend a number of other high peaks in the area, including North Twin, South Twin, Mount Kitchener, Mount Stutfield and Snow Dome.
North Twin is the third-highest peak in the Canadian Rockies, after Mount Robson and Mount Columbia.

Northern Rocky Mountains

Northern Canadian RockiesNorthern RockiesRockies
The Canadian Rockies are subdivided into numerous mountain ranges, structured in two main groupings, the Continental Ranges, which has three main subdivisions, the Front Range, Park Ranges and Kootenay Ranges, and the Northern Rockies which comprise two main groupings, the Hart Ranges and the Muskwa Ranges.
The Northern Rocky Mountains, usually referred to as the Northern Rockies, are a subdivision of the Canadian Rockies comprising the northern half of the Canadian segment of the Rocky Mountains.

Continental Ranges

Continental
The Canadian Rockies are subdivided into numerous mountain ranges, structured in two main groupings, the Continental Ranges, which has three main subdivisions, the Front Range, Park Ranges and Kootenay Ranges, and the Northern Rockies which comprise two main groupings, the Hart Ranges and the Muskwa Ranges.
It is the largest and best-known of the three main such subdivisions of the Canadian Rockies, the others being the Hart Ranges and the Muskwa Ranges.

Monkman Pass

Monkman Pass Highway Associationvia the Monkman Pass
The division-point of the two main groupings is at Monkman Pass northwest of Mount Robson and to the southwest of Mount Ovington.
Monkman Pass, in the Canadian Rockies, is located southwest of Tumbler Ridge and northeast of Hansard.

Hart Ranges

The Canadian Rockies are subdivided into numerous mountain ranges, structured in two main groupings, the Continental Ranges, which has three main subdivisions, the Front Range, Park Ranges and Kootenay Ranges, and the Northern Rockies which comprise two main groupings, the Hart Ranges and the Muskwa Ranges.
The Hart Ranges are one of the main geographic subdivisions of the Canadian Rockies and are the main part of the area that is meant by the Northern Rockies, although the much larger Muskwa Ranges to the north are more deserving of that term — but also much more inaccessible and much less visited — and the Northern Rockies are generally also considered to extend at least as far south as Mount Robson, which is in the Continental Ranges.

North Saskatchewan River

North SaskatchewanNorthdifferent watershed
Notable rivers originating in the Canadian Rockies include the Fraser, Columbia, North Saskatchewan, Bow and Athabasca Rivers.
The North Saskatchewan River is a glacier-fed river that flows from the Canadian Rockies continental divide east to central Saskatchewan, where it joins with another major river to make up the Saskatchewan River.

Kootenay Ranges

Kootenay
The Canadian Rockies are subdivided into numerous mountain ranges, structured in two main groupings, the Continental Ranges, which has three main subdivisions, the Front Range, Park Ranges and Kootenay Ranges, and the Northern Rockies which comprise two main groupings, the Hart Ranges and the Muskwa Ranges.
The Kootenay Ranges, also known as the Western Ranges, are one of the three main subdivisions of the Continental Ranges which comprise the southern half of the Canadian Rockies, the other two subdivisions being the Front Ranges and the Park Ranges (which is the largest of the groupings).

Columbia River

ColumbiaColumbia basinLower Columbia
Notable rivers originating in the Canadian Rockies include the Fraser, Columbia, North Saskatchewan, Bow and Athabasca Rivers.
The trench is a broad, deep, and long glacial valley between the Canadian Rockies and the Columbia Mountains in BC. For its first 200 mi, the Columbia flows northwest along the trench through Windermere Lake and the town of Invermere, a region known in British Columbia as the Columbia Valley, then northwest to Golden and into Kinbasket Lake.

Continental Divide of the Americas

Continental DivideGreat DivideContinental Divide of North America
The Rockies form the divide between the Pacific Ocean drainage on the west and that of Hudson Bay and the Arctic Ocean on the east.
From there the Divide traverses the McGregor Plateau to the spine of the Rockies, following the crest of the Canadian Rockies southeast to the 120th meridian west, from there forming the boundary between southern British Columbia and southern Alberta.