A report on Canadians

A 1911 political cartoon on Canada's bicultural identity showing a flag combining symbols of Britain, France and Canada; titled "The next favor. 'A flag to suit the minority.'"
Monument to Multiculturalism by Francesco Pirelli in Toronto; four identical sculptures are located in Buffalo City, Changchun, Sarajevo, and Sydney
Approximately 98% of Canadians can speak English or French (2006) ''

Canadians (Canadiens) are people identified with the country of Canada.

- Canadians
A 1911 political cartoon on Canada's bicultural identity showing a flag combining symbols of Britain, France and Canada; titled "The next favor. 'A flag to suit the minority.'"

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Fur traders at work as depicted in 1777 by Claude J. Sauthier

Culture of Canada

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The culture of Canada embodies the artistic, culinary, literary, humour, musical, political and social elements that are representative of Canadians.

The culture of Canada embodies the artistic, culinary, literary, humour, musical, political and social elements that are representative of Canadians.

Fur traders at work as depicted in 1777 by Claude J. Sauthier
A Canadian war bond poster that depicts an industrious beaver, a national symbol of Canada
"Ye Gude Olde Days" from Hockey: Canada's Royal Winter Game, 1899
Monument to Multiculturalism, by Francesco Pirelli in Toronto.
The Centre Block of the Canadian parliament buildings on Parliament Hill
Quebec's National Holiday (La Fête nationale du Québec) is celebrated annually on June 24, St. John the Baptist Day
A copy of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
The maple leaf is the symbol most associated with Canadian identity.
Just for Laughs Festival in Montreal, Québec at the Saint-Denis Theatre.
One of the national symbols of Canada, the beaver is depicted on the Canadian five-cent piece and was on the first Canadian postage stamp, c. 1859.
Tom Thomson, The Jack Pine, Winter 1916–17. National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa
Margaret Atwood is a Canadian poet, novelist, literary critic, essayist, inventor, teacher and environmental activist.
A 1904 postcard showing the Grand Opera House and Majestic Theatre, Adelaide Street, in the current Toronto Theatre District.
CBC's English-language master control point, the Canadian Broadcasting Centre, in Toronto
Standard Theatre, 482 Queen Street West, Toronto, 1906
Ottawa Jazz Festival inside Rideau Centre, 2008
Aboriginal Peoples Television Network headquarters in Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Ice hockey being played at McGill University, in Montreal, 1884.
A small sampling of Canadian foods. Clockwise from top left: Montreal-style smoked meat, maple syrup, poutine, Nanaimo bar, butter tart, peameal bacon

By the 19th century, Canadians came to believe themselves possessed of a unique "northern character," due to the long, harsh winters that only those of hardy body and mind could survive.

Coat of arms of Canada

Government of Canada

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Body responsible for the federal administration of Canada.

Body responsible for the federal administration of Canada.

Coat of arms of Canada
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The Centre Block of the Parliament buildings on Parliament Hill
Supreme Court Building in Ottawa
A copy of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

The 338 members of the House of Commons, known as (MPs) are directly elected by Canadian citizens, with each member representing a single electoral district for a period mandated by the Canada Elections Act of no more than four years (though the Charter of Rights and Freedoms mandates a maximum of five years).

Ukrainian Canadians

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Post-independence Ukrainian fifteen-kopiyka stamp commemorating the centennial of Ukrainian settlement in Canada, 1891–1991
Croatia
Bosnia
Commemorative plaque and a statue entitled "Why?" / "Pourquoi?" / "Чому (Chomu)?", by John Boxtel at the location of the Castle Mountain Internment Camp, Banff National Park
Commemorative statue entitled "Never Forget" / "Ne Jamais Oublier" / "Ніколи Не Забути (Nikoly Ne Zabuty)", by John Boxtel; and damaged plaque at the cemetery of the Kapuskasing Internment Camp, Kapuskasing, northern Ontario
A group of Ukrainian Canadians pictured at a celebration inside Toronto's Old Fort York, taken in May 1934. Photograph from the M.O. Hammond fonds held at the Archives of Ontario.
Ukrainian language street signs alongside English ones in Hafford, Saskatchewan
St. George's Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral, Saskatoon.
St. Volodymyr's Ukrainian Orthodox Cathedral, Toronto.
A Ukrainian dance troupe at the BC Ukrainian Cultural Festival
In 1974, what was then the world's largest pysanka was erected in Vegreville, Alberta, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. It has since been exceeded by a pysanka built in Ukraine.
Map of the dominant self-identified ethnic origins of ancestors per census division. Actual physical origins of ancestors may be different. Ukrainian-plurality areas are highlighted in teal. Note that Ukrainians are a significant minority elsewhere, and that, numerically, most Ukrainian Canadians live in cities.
Dr. Joseph Oleskow in 1896, before his second voyage to Canada
Ukrainian Museum of Canada, Saskatoon
Ukrainian Museum of Canada workers in traditional dress outside the Saskatoon museum
Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre "Oseredok", Winnipeg
A Ukrainian folk music "orchestra" associated with the then Mykhailo Hrushevsky Institute of Edmonton, now known as St John's Institute
St Petro Mohyla Institute, Saskatoon
St Vladimir Institute, Toronto
Former Sheptytsky Institute building at Saint Paul University in Ottawa

Ukrainian Canadians (Українські канадці, Україноканадці; Canadiens d'origine ukrainienne) are Canadian citizens of Ukrainian descent or Ukrainian-born people who immigrated to Canada.

South Asian ancestry % in Canada (2016)

South Asian Canadians

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South Asian ancestry % in Canada (2016)
Punjabi Sikhs in Vancouver, 1908
Punjabi Sikhs at a lumber camp, circa 1914
South Asian settlers on board the Komagata Maru in Vancouver
The BAPS Shri Swaminarayan Mandir Toronto
Brampton, Ontario is home to the highest percentage of Canadians from South Asia with 261,705 or 44.3% of the population.
Surrey, British Columbia is home to the second-highest percentage of South Asian Canadians with 168,040 or 32.4% of the population.

South Asian Canadians are Canadians who were either born in or can trace their ancestry to South Asia, which includes the nations of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, and the Maldives.

Map of the dominant self-identified ethnic origins per census division of 2006

Ethnic origins of people in Canada

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Map of the dominant self-identified ethnic origins per census division of 2006
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Listed here are the ethnic groups of Canadian residents (citizens, landed immigrants and non-citizen temporary residents) as self-identified in the 2016 census in which approximately 35,151,000 census forms were completed).

Indian ancestry in Canada (2016)

Indo-Canadians

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Indian ancestry in Canada (2016)
Indian ancestry in Canada (2016)
Punjabi Sikhs in Vancouver, 1908
Indians at CPR station in Vancouver, c. 1914
Komagata Maru Incident, 1914
Queensborough, New Westminster Sikh temple, 1931.
A group of Punjabi Indo-Canadians attending a Punjabi wedding reception
The BAPS Shri Swaminarayan Mandir Toronto in Etobicoke, Ontario, built by Canada's Gujarati Hindu community.
Hindu Heritage Centre in Mississauga, Ontario.
Gur Sikh Temple (Abbotsford)
Gurudwara Nanaksar Sahib, Edmonton, Alberta
Vancouver Sikh Temple, c. 1911

Indian Canadians are Canadians with ancestry from India.

Map of visible minorities in Canada by province, 2016

Visible minority

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Defined by the Government of Canada as "persons, other than aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour".

Defined by the Government of Canada as "persons, other than aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour".

Map of visible minorities in Canada by province, 2016

Over seven million Canadians identified as a member of a visible minority group in the 2016 Census, accounting for 22.3% of the total population.

The Queen of Canada

Parliament of Canada

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Federal legislature of Canada, seated at Parliament Hill in Ottawa, and is composed of three parts: the monarch, the Senate, and the House of Commons.

Federal legislature of Canada, seated at Parliament Hill in Ottawa, and is composed of three parts: the monarch, the Senate, and the House of Commons.

The Queen of Canada
The Senate
The House of Commons
Usher of the black rod, Kevin S. MacLeod, before the thrones in the Senate chamber, 2009
Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip at the opening of Parliament, 14 October 1957
King George VI, with Queen Elizabeth, grants Royal Assent to bills in the Senate chamber, 1939
The burning of the Parliament in Montreal, 1849
The first session of the House of Commons in its temporary location at the Victoria Memorial Museum, 18 March 1918

Though the form of the new federal legislature was again nearly identical to the Parliament of the United Kingdom, the decision to retain this model was made with heavy influence from the just-concluded American Civil War, which indicated to many Canadians the faults of the American federal system, with its relatively powerful states and a less powerful federal government.

Northwest Territories

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Federal territory of Canada.

Federal territory of Canada.

Köppen climate types in the Northwest Territories
Members of the Coppermine expedition caught by a storm in Coronation Gulf, August 1821
Map of the North-Western Territory and Rupert's Land, 1859
A proclamation concerning the formation of the North-West Territories, from recently transferred territories to the Canadian government
Sign for an eye clinic in Yellowknife with all 11 official territorial languages
Aerial view of the Diavik Diamond Mine in the North Slave Region
Nahanni National Park Reserve, one of several national parks and reserves in the Northwest Territories
The chamber of the Northwest Territories Legislative Building
Administrative regions of the Northwest Territories
A snow fort at the annual Snowking Winter Festival in Yellowknife
Dempster Highway, south of Inuvik
Entrance to Yellowknife Airport, the largest airport in the territory

Canadian – 18.6%

Italian Canadians

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Italian immigrants lay cobblestones on King Street in Toronto, 1903
A grocery store owned by an Italian family in Little Italy, Montreal, 1910
Sign of Mirador, a restaurant in Montreal owned by an Italian immigrant, 1948

Italian Canadians (italo-canadesi, italo-canadiens) comprise Canadians who have full or partial Italian heritage and Italians who migrated from Italy or reside in Canada.