Canadians

CanadianCanadian citizensCanadaCanadian studentCanadian citizenCanadian-AmericanCanadian-bornCanadian AmericanScottish-CanadianBand Director
Canadians (Canadiens) are people identified with the country of Canada.wikipedia
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Immigration to Canada

immigrationimmigrantsCanadian immigration
Canada is a multilingual and multicultural society home to people of groups of many different ethnic, religious, and national origins, with the majority of the population made up of Old World immigrants and their descendants.
The majority of these people become Canadian citizens.

Canadian nationality law

Canadian citizenshipCanadian citizenCanadian
Canada's nationality law closely mirrored that of the United Kingdom.
Canadian citizenship is typically obtained by birth in Canada on the principle of jus soli, or birth abroad when at least one parent is a Canadian citizen or by adoption by at least one Canadian citizen under the rules of jus sanguinis.

Culture of Canada

Canadian culturecultureCanadian
Elements of Indigenous, French, British, and more recent immigrant customs, languages, and religions have combined to form the culture of Canada, and thus a Canadian identity.
By the 19th century Canadians came to believe themselves possessed of a unique "northern character," due to the long, harsh winters that only those of hardy body and mind could survive.

European Canadians

EuropeanWhiteEuropean Canadian
In the mid-to-late 19th century, Canada had a policy of assisting immigrants from Europe, including an estimated 100,000 unwanted "Home Children" from Britain.
European Canadians (les Canadiens Européens), also known as Euro-Canadians, are Canadians with ancestry from Europe.

Population of Canada

Population of Canada by yearEstimated Canadian populationList of population of Canada by years
The population of Canada has consistently risen, doubling approximately every 40 years, since the establishment of the Canadian Confederation in 1867.
Canada ranks [[List of countries and dependencies by population#Sovereign states and dependencies by population|38th]] by population, comprising about 0.5% of the world's total, with over 37 million Canadians as of 2019.

Old Stock Canadians

Descendants of Francophone and Anglophone northern Europeans who arrived in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries are often referred to as Old Stock Canadians.
Some writers describe the effort to construct a Canadian identity encompassing First Nations peoples, old stock Francophones and Anglophones, and recent immigrants and their Canada-born descendants.

Canadian diaspora

Canada expatriatesCanadian citizens abroadexpatriate Canadian
As of a 2010 report by the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, there were 2.8 million Canadian citizens abroad.
The Canadian diaspora is the group of Canadians living outside the borders of Canada.

English Canadians

EnglishAnglophoneEnglish Canadian
According to the 2016 census, the country's largest self-reported ethnic origin is Canadian (accounting for 32% of the population), followed by English (18.3%), Scottish (13.9%), French (13.6%), Irish (13.4%), German (9.6%), Chinese (5.1%), Italian (4.6%), First Nations (4.4%), Indian (4.0%), and Ukrainian (3.9%).
English Canadians or Anglo-Canadians (Canadiens anglais), refers to either Canadians of English ethnic origin and heritage or to English-speaking or Anglophone, Canadians of any ethnic origin; it is used primarily in contrast with French Canadians.

Ethnic origins of people in Canada

Ethnic groups in Canadaethnic groupsself-reported ethnic origin
According to the 2016 census, the country's largest self-reported ethnic origin is Canadian (accounting for 32% of the population), followed by English (18.3%), Scottish (13.9%), French (13.6%), Irish (13.4%), German (9.6%), Chinese (5.1%), Italian (4.6%), First Nations (4.4%), Indian (4.0%), and Ukrainian (3.9%).
Given here are the ethnic origins of Canadian residents (citizens, landed immigrants, and non-citizen temporary residents) as recorded by them on their 2016 census form (around 35,151,000 in total).

2016 Canadian Census

2016 Census of Population2016 CensusCanada 2016 Census
According to the 2016 census, the country's largest self-reported ethnic origin is Canadian (accounting for 32% of the population), followed by English (18.3%), Scottish (13.9%), French (13.6%), Irish (13.4%), German (9.6%), Chinese (5.1%), Italian (4.6%), First Nations (4.4%), Indian (4.0%), and Ukrainian (3.9%).
The 2016 Canadian Census is the most recent detailed enumeration of the Canadian residents, which counted a population of 35,151,728, a NaN% change from its 2011 population of 33,476,688.

Irish Canadians

IrishIrish CanadianIrish-Canadian
According to the 2016 census, the country's largest self-reported ethnic origin is Canadian (accounting for 32% of the population), followed by English (18.3%), Scottish (13.9%), French (13.6%), Irish (13.4%), German (9.6%), Chinese (5.1%), Italian (4.6%), First Nations (4.4%), Indian (4.0%), and Ukrainian (3.9%).
Irish Canadians (Gaedheal-Cheanadaigh) are Canadian citizens who have full or partial Irish heritage including descendants who trace their ancestry to immigrants who originated in Ireland.

Chinese Canadians

ChineseChinese CanadianChinese-Canadian
According to the 2016 census, the country's largest self-reported ethnic origin is Canadian (accounting for 32% of the population), followed by English (18.3%), Scottish (13.9%), French (13.6%), Irish (13.4%), German (9.6%), Chinese (5.1%), Italian (4.6%), First Nations (4.4%), Indian (4.0%), and Ukrainian (3.9%).
Chinese Canadians are Canadians of full or partial Chinese ancestry which includes Canadian-born Chinese.

German Canadians

GermanGerman CanadianGerman-Canadian
According to the 2016 census, the country's largest self-reported ethnic origin is Canadian (accounting for 32% of the population), followed by English (18.3%), Scottish (13.9%), French (13.6%), Irish (13.4%), German (9.6%), Chinese (5.1%), Italian (4.6%), First Nations (4.4%), Indian (4.0%), and Ukrainian (3.9%).
German Canadians (Deutsch-Kanadier or Deutschkanadier, ) are Canadian citizens of ethnic German ancestry.

Italian Canadians

Italian-CanadianItalianItalian Canadian
According to the 2016 census, the country's largest self-reported ethnic origin is Canadian (accounting for 32% of the population), followed by English (18.3%), Scottish (13.9%), French (13.6%), Irish (13.4%), German (9.6%), Chinese (5.1%), Italian (4.6%), First Nations (4.4%), Indian (4.0%), and Ukrainian (3.9%).
Italian Canadians (italo-canadesi, Italo-Canadiens) comprise Canadians who have full or partial Italian heritage and Italians who migrated from Italy or reside in Canada.

Scottish Canadians

ScottishScottish-CanadianScottish Canadian
According to the 2016 census, the country's largest self-reported ethnic origin is Canadian (accounting for 32% of the population), followed by English (18.3%), Scottish (13.9%), French (13.6%), Irish (13.4%), German (9.6%), Chinese (5.1%), Italian (4.6%), First Nations (4.4%), Indian (4.0%), and Ukrainian (3.9%).
According to the 2011 Census of Canada, the number of Canadians claiming full or partial Scottish descent is 4,714,970, or 15.10% of the nation's total population.

Indo-Canadians

Indo-CanadianIndianIndian-Canadian
According to the 2016 census, the country's largest self-reported ethnic origin is Canadian (accounting for 32% of the population), followed by English (18.3%), Scottish (13.9%), French (13.6%), Irish (13.4%), German (9.6%), Chinese (5.1%), Italian (4.6%), First Nations (4.4%), Indian (4.0%), and Ukrainian (3.9%).
Indian Canadians or Indo-Canadians are Canadian citizens whose heritage belongs to any of the many ethnic groups of Republic of India.

Ukrainian Canadians

UkrainianUkrainian CanadianUkrainian-Canadian
According to the 2016 census, the country's largest self-reported ethnic origin is Canadian (accounting for 32% of the population), followed by English (18.3%), Scottish (13.9%), French (13.6%), Irish (13.4%), German (9.6%), Chinese (5.1%), Italian (4.6%), First Nations (4.4%), Indian (4.0%), and Ukrainian (3.9%).
Ukrainian Canadians (Українські канадці, Україноканадці; Canadiens d'origine ukrainienne) are Canadian citizens of Ukrainian descent or Ukrainian-born people who immigrated to Canada.

South Asian Canadians

South AsianSouth AsiansSouth Asian Canadian
In 2016, the largest visible minority groups were South Asian (5.6%), Chinese (5.1%), and Black (3.5%).
South Asian Canadians are Canadians who were either born in or can trace their ancestry to South Asia, which includes nations such as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, Nepal and Maldives.

Dutch Canadians

Dutch (Netherlands)DutchDutch Canadian
Dutch Canadians are any Canadian citizens of Dutch ancestry.

Visible minority

visible minoritiesracializedVisible minority population
Another 22.3 percent of the population belonged to a non-indigenous visible minority.
Over seven million Canadians identified as a member of a visible minority group in the 2016 Census, accounting for 22.3% of the total population.

Canadian Pacific Railway

Canadian PacificCPRCP Rail
The Chinese Immigration Act eventually placed a head tax on all Chinese immigrants, in hopes of discouraging Chinese immigration after completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
This ended service by The Canadian over CPR rails, and the train was rerouted on the former Super Continental route via Canadian National without a change of name.

Politics of Canada

Canadian politicsfederal governmentCanadian politician
It is a product of its ethnicities, languages, religions, political, and legal system(s).
Individual rights, equality and inclusiveness (social equality) have risen to the forefront of political and legal importance for most Canadians, as demonstrated through support for the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, a relatively free economy, and social liberal attitudes toward women's rights (like pregnancy termination), homosexuality, euthanasia or cannabis use.

History of the Jews in Canada

JewishJewish CanadianCanada
The earliest documentation of Jewish presence in Canada occurs in the 1754 British Army records from the French and Indian War.
The history of the Jews in Canada are Canadian citizens who follow Judaism as their religion and/or are ethnically Jewish.

Political culture of Canada

Canadian political culturepolitical cultures of CanadaCanada's political culture
However, Canada has no official religion, and support for religious pluralism (Freedom of religion in Canada) is an important part of Canada's political culture.
Individual rights, equality and inclusiveness (a just society) have risen to the forefront of political and legal importance for most Canadians, as demonstrated through support for the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, a relatively free economy, and social liberal attitudes toward homosexuality, women's rights, and other egalitarian movements.