Canidae

canidcanidscaninecaninesdogsCaninidog familyVulpinidogCanina
The biological family Canidae (from Latin, canis, "dog") is a lineage of carnivorans that includes domestic dogs, wolves, coyotes, foxes, jackals, dingoes, and many other extant and extinct dog-like mammals.wikipedia
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Fox

foxesvixenvulpine
(from Latin, canis, "dog") is a lineage of carnivorans that includes domestic dogs, wolves, coyotes, foxes, jackals, dingoes, and many other extant and extinct dog-like mammals.
Foxes are small-to-medium-sized, omnivorous mammals belonging to several genera of the family Canidae.

Dingo

dingoesAustralian dingodingos
(from Latin, canis, "dog") is a lineage of carnivorans that includes domestic dogs, wolves, coyotes, foxes, jackals, dingoes, and many other extant and extinct dog-like mammals.
It is a medium-sized canid that possesses a lean, hardy body adapted for speed, agility, and stamina.

Dog

Canis lupus familiarisdogsdomestic dog
(from Latin, canis, "dog") is a lineage of carnivorans that includes domestic dogs, wolves, coyotes, foxes, jackals, dingoes, and many other extant and extinct dog-like mammals.
Linnaeus considered the dog to be a separate species from the wolf because of its cauda recurvata - its upturning tail which is not found in any other canid.

Borophaginae

borophagineborophagine canidsBorophagine dogs
In the history of the carnivores, the family Canidae is represented by the two extinct subfamilies designated as Hesperocyoninae and Borophaginae, and the extant subfamily Caninae.
The subfamily Borophaginae is an extinct group of canids called "bone-crushing dogs" that were endemic to North America during the Oligocene to Pliocene and lived roughly 36—2.5 million years ago and existing for about.

Hesperocyoninae

hesperocyonine
In the history of the carnivores, the family Canidae is represented by the two extinct subfamilies designated as Hesperocyoninae and Borophaginae, and the extant subfamily Caninae.
The Hesperocyoninae are a subfamily of extinct canids.

Wolf

wolvesgray wolfgrey wolf
(from Latin, canis, "dog") is a lineage of carnivorans that includes domestic dogs, wolves, coyotes, foxes, jackals, dingoes, and many other extant and extinct dog-like mammals. Canids vary in size from the 2 m gray wolf to the 24 cm fennec fox.
Linnaeus considered the dog to be a separate species from the wolf because of its cauda recurvata–its upturning tail–which is not found in any other canid.

Caninae

caninecaninestrue canine
In the history of the carnivores, the family Canidae is represented by the two extinct subfamilies designated as Hesperocyoninae and Borophaginae, and the extant subfamily Caninae.
In the history of the carnivores, the family Canidae is represented by the two extinct subfamilies designated as Hesperocyoninae and Borophaginae, and the extant subfamily Caninae.

Fennec fox

Fennecdesert foxfennec foxes
Canids vary in size from the 2 m gray wolf to the 24 cm fennec fox.
Its name comes from the Berber-Arabic word, which means fox. The fennec is the smallest species of canid.

Carnivora

carnivorescarnivorancarnivorans
(from Latin, canis, "dog") is a lineage of carnivorans that includes domestic dogs, wolves, coyotes, foxes, jackals, dingoes, and many other extant and extinct dog-like mammals.
The superfamily Canoidea (or suborder Caniformia) – Canidae (wolves, dogs and foxes), Mephitidae (skunks and stink badgers), Mustelidae (weasels, badgers, and otters), Procyonidae (raccoons), Ursidae (bears), Ailuridae (red panda), Otariidae (eared seals), Odobenidae (walrus), and Phocidae (earless seals) (the last three families formerly classified in the superfamily Pinnipedia) and the extinct family Amphicyonidae (bear-dogs) – are characterized by having nonchambered or partially chambered auditory bullae, nonretractable claws, and a well-developed baculum.

Leptocyon

The caniforms included the fox-like genus Leptocyon whose various species existed from 34 Mya before branching 11.9 Mya into Vulpini (foxes) and Canini (canines). One of the early members of the Hesperocyonines, the genus Hesperocyon, gave rise to Archaeocyon and Leptocyon.
Leptocyon (Greek: "slender dog" ) is an extinct genus of small canid endemic to North America.

African golden wolf

African golden wolvesgolden wolvesCanis anthus
When comparing the African and Eurasian golden jackals, the study concluded that the African specimens represented a distinct monophyletic lineage that should be recognized as a separate species, Canis anthus (African golden wolf).
The African golden wolf (Canis anthus), also known as the Egyptian jackal or grey jackal, is a canid native to north and northeastern Africa.

Ethiopian wolf

Ethiopian wolvesCanis simensisAbyssinian wolf
The Ethiopian wolf (Canis simensis), also known as the Simien jackal or Simien fox, is a canid native to the Ethiopian Highlands.

Black-backed jackal

jackalBlack-backedC. mesomelas
The black-backed jackal (Canis mesomelas) is a canid native to two areas of Africa, separated by roughly 900 km.

African wild dog

painted hunting dogAfrican wild dogswild dog
The African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) is a canid native to sub-Saharan Africa.

Dusicyon

Dusicyon avusDusicyon sp.
The cladogram below is based on the phylogeny of Lindblad-Toh et al. (2005), modified to incorporate recent findings on Canis, Vulpes, Lycalopex, and Dusicyon species.
Dusicyon is an extinct genus of South American canids.

Golden jackal

Indian jackaljackalCanis aureus
The biological family Canidae is composed of the South American canids, the fox-like canids, and the wolf-like canids.

Bush dog

Speothos venaticusS. venaticusSouth American bush dogs
The other lineage consisted of the so-called South American endemic species; the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), the short-eared dog (Atelocynus microtis), the bush dog (Speothos venaticus), the crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous), and the South American foxes (Lycalopex spp.).
The bush dog (Speothos venaticus) is a canid found in Central and South America.

Raccoon dog

raccoon dogsNyctereutes procyonoidesracoon dog
The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides, from the Greek words nukt-, "night" + ereutēs, "wanderer" + prokuōn, "before-dog" [but in New Latin used to mean "raccoon"] + -oidēs, "similar to"), also known as the mangut (its Evenki name), tanuki or neoguri is a canid indigenous to East Asia.

Gray fox

Urocyon cinereoargenteusgrey foxgray
One of the resulting lineages consisted of the gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargentus) and the now-extinct dire wolf (Canis dirus).
The gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), or grey fox, is an omnivorous mammal of the family Canidae, widespread throughout North America and Central America.

Hesperocyon

AlloeodectesHesperocyon gregariousHesperocyon gregarius
One of the early members of the Hesperocyonines, the genus Hesperocyon, gave rise to Archaeocyon and Leptocyon.
Hesperocyon is an extinct genus of canids (subfamily Hesperocyoninae, family Canidae) that was endemic to North America, ranging from southern Canada to Colorado.

Canis

caninecaninescani-
Around 9–10 Mya during the Late Miocene, the Canis, Urocyon, and Vulpes genera expanded from southwestern North America, where the canine radiation began.
Canis is a genus of the Canidae containing multiple extant species, such as wolves, coyotes and jackals.

Caniformia

caniformcaniformsCanoidea
The cat-like feliformia and dog-like caniforms emerged within the Carnivoramorpha Around 45–42 Mya (million years ago).
Most members of this group have non-retractile claws (the fisher, marten, red panda, and ringtail have retractile or semi-retractile claws ) and tend to be plantigrade (with the exception of the Canidae).

Vulpes

foxestrue foxfox
Around 9–10 Mya during the Late Miocene, the Canis, Urocyon, and Vulpes genera expanded from southwestern North America, where the canine radiation began.
Vulpes is a genus of the Canidae.

Kit fox

San Joaquin kit foxVulpes macrotisDesert kit fox
The kit fox is the smallest species of the family Canidae found in North America (except for specially bred domestic dog breeds like teacup Yorkshire.) It has large ears, between 71 and 95 mm, that help the fox lower its body temperature and give it exceptional hearing (much like those of the fennec fox).

Bear

Ursidaebearsursine
Prohesperocyon probably had slightly longer limbs than its predecessors, and also had parallel and closely touching toes which differ markedly from the splayed arrangements of the digits in bears.
Bears' closest living relatives are the pinnipeds, canids, and musteloids.