Canola oil

canolaCanola/Rapeseed oilcanola (rapeseed) oilrapeseed or canola oilcanola (rapeseed)RapeOilseed Rapecanola plantLargest canola producercanola meal
Canola oil, or canola for short, is a vegetable oil derived from a variety of rapeseed that is low in erucic acid, as opposed to colza oil.wikipedia
379 Related Articles

Rapeseed

rapeseed oiloilseed raperape
Canola oil, or canola for short, is a vegetable oil derived from a variety of rapeseed that is low in erucic acid, as opposed to colza oil.
Rapeseed (Brassica napus), also known as rape, oilseed rape, (and, in the case of one particular group of cultivars, canola), is a bright-yellow flowering member of the family Brassicaceae (mustard or cabbage family), cultivated mainly for its oil-rich seed.

Cooking oil

oiledible oiloils
There are both edible and industrial forms produced from the seed of any of several cultivars of the plant family Brassicaceae, namely cultivars of Brassica napus L., Brassica rapa subsp.
There is a wide variety of cooking oils from plant sources such as olive oil, palm oil, soybean oil, canola oil (rapeseed oil), corn oil, peanut oil and other vegetable oils, as well as animal-based oils like butter and lard.

Brassica juncea

mustard greensB. junceamustard
B. campestris L. or Brassica juncea, which are also referred to as "canola".

Vegetable oil

oilseedoilseedsoil
Canola oil, or canola for short, is a vegetable oil derived from a variety of rapeseed that is low in erucic acid, as opposed to colza oil.
Such oils include the major cooking oils – soybean, rapeseed, canola, sunflower, safflower, peanut, cottonseed, etc. Tropical oils, such as coconut, palm, and rice bran oils, are particularly valued in Asian cultures for high-temperature cooking, because of their unusually high flash points.

Biodiesel

bio-dieselB20green diesel
It is also used as a source of biodiesel. The oil has many non-food uses and, like soybean oil, is often used interchangeably with non-renewable petroleum-based oils in products, including industrial lubricants, biodiesel, candles, lipsticks, and newspaper inks, depending on the price on the spot market.
The train will be powered by biodiesel made in part from canola grown in agricultural regions through which the short line runs.

Keith Downey (agricultural scientist)

Keith Downey
Canola was bred from rapeseed cultivars of B. napus and B. rapa at the University of Manitoba, Canada, by Keith Downey and Baldur R. Stefansson in the early 1970s, having then a different nutritional profile than present-day oil in addition to much less erucic acid.
Richard Keith Downey, (born January 26, 1927) is a Canadian agricultural scientist and, as one of the originators of canola, became known as the "Father of Canola".

Brassica

brassicascole crops ''Brassica'' species
Rapeseed belongs to the genus Brassica.
Brassica species and varieties commonly used for food include broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, choy sum, rutabaga, turnip and some seeds used in the production of canola oil and the condiment mustard.

Baldur R. Stefansson

Canola was bred from rapeseed cultivars of B. napus and B. rapa at the University of Manitoba, Canada, by Keith Downey and Baldur R. Stefansson in the early 1970s, having then a different nutritional profile than present-day oil in addition to much less erucic acid.
Baldur Rosmund Stefansson, (April 26, 1917 – January 3, 2002) was a Canadian agricultural scientist and as one of the originators of canola, became

Monsanto Canada Inc v Schmeiser

Monsanto v. Schmeiser casePercy Schmeiser and Monsanto Inc
In one high-profile case (Monsanto Canada Inc. v. Schmeiser) the Monsanto Company sued Percy Schmeiser for patent infringement after he replanted canola seed he had harvested from his field, which he discovered was contaminated with Monsanto's patented glyphosate-tolerant canola by spraying it with glyphosate, leaving only the resistant plants.
Monsanto Canada Inc v Schmeiser [2004] 1 S.C.R. 902, 2004 SCC 34 is a leading Supreme Court of Canada case on patent rights for biotechnology, between a Canadian canola farmer, Percy Schmeiser, and the agricultural biotechnology company Monsanto.

Genetically modified crops

genetically modifiedtransgenic planttransgenic plants
A genetically engineered rapeseed that is tolerant to herbicide was first introduced to Canada in 1995 (Roundup Ready canola).
In 1995 canola with modified oil composition (Calgene), Bt maize (Ciba-Geigy), bromoxynil-tolerant cotton (Calgene), Bt cotton (Monsanto), glyphosate-tolerant soybeans (Monsanto), virus-tolerant squash (Asgrow), and additional delayed ripening tomatoes (DNAP, Zeneca/Peto and Monsanto) were approved.

Winnipeg Commodity Exchange

Winnipeg Grain ExchangeGrain Exchange BuildingCommodity Exchange Tower
The benchmark price for worldwide canola trade is the ICE Futures Canada (formerly Winnipeg Commodity Exchange) canola futures contract.
Futures and options contracts are electronically traded in western barley and canola (rapeseed).

Percy Schmeiser

Percy
In one high-profile case (Monsanto Canada Inc. v. Schmeiser) the Monsanto Company sued Percy Schmeiser for patent infringement after he replanted canola seed he had harvested from his field, which he discovered was contaminated with Monsanto's patented glyphosate-tolerant canola by spraying it with glyphosate, leaving only the resistant plants.
He specializes in breeding and growing canola.

List of canola diseases

canola
List of canola diseases
This article is a list of diseases of rapeseed and canola (Brassica napus and B. rapa or B. campestris).

Brassica rapa

B. rapafield mustardOilseed rapa
There are both edible and industrial forms produced from the seed of any of several cultivars of the plant family Brassicaceae, namely cultivars of Brassica napus L., Brassica rapa subsp.
The oil made from the seed is sometimes also called canola or colza, which is one reason why it is sometimes confused with rapeseed oil, but this comes from a different Brassica species (Brassica napus). The oilseeds known as canola are sometimes particular varieties of Brassica rapa (termed Polish Canola) but usually the related species Brassica napus (rapeseed) and Brassica juncea (mustard greens and mizuna).

Hexane

n''-hexanen-hexanehexanes
Almost all commercial canola oil is then extracted using hexane solvent which is recovered at the end of processing.
They are also used to extract cooking oils (such as canola oil or soy oil) from seeds, for cleansing and degreasing a variety of items, and in textile manufacturing.

Glyphosate

Roundupsuperweedsglyphosates
In one high-profile case (Monsanto Canada Inc. v. Schmeiser) the Monsanto Company sued Percy Schmeiser for patent infringement after he replanted canola seed he had harvested from his field, which he discovered was contaminated with Monsanto's patented glyphosate-tolerant canola by spraying it with glyphosate, leaving only the resistant plants. There are several forms of genetic modification, such as herbicide (glyphosate and glufosinate, for example) tolerance and different qualities in canola oil.
Current glyphosate-resistant crops include soy, maize (corn), canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, and cotton, with wheat still under development.

Canada

🇨🇦CanadianCAN
Canola was bred from rapeseed cultivars of B. napus and B. rapa at the University of Manitoba, Canada, by Keith Downey and Baldur R. Stefansson in the early 1970s, having then a different nutritional profile than present-day oil in addition to much less erucic acid. When the war blocked European and Asian sources of rapeseed oil, a critical shortage developed, and Canada began to expand its limited rapeseed production.
Canada is additionally one of the world's largest suppliers of agricultural products; the Canadian Prairies are one of the most important global producers of wheat, canola, and other grains.

Oleic acid

oleicoleateoleoyl
It also makes up 59-75% of pecan oil, 61% of canola oil, 36-67% of peanut oil, 60% of macadamia oil, 20-80% of sunflower oil, 15-20% of grape seed oil, sea buckthorn oil, and sesame oil, and 14% of poppyseed oil.

Monsanto

Monsanto CompanyCalgeneMonsanto Industrial Chemicals Co.
In one high-profile case (Monsanto Canada Inc. v. Schmeiser) the Monsanto Company sued Percy Schmeiser for patent infringement after he replanted canola seed he had harvested from his field, which he discovered was contaminated with Monsanto's patented glyphosate-tolerant canola by spraying it with glyphosate, leaving only the resistant plants.
Farmers widely adopted the technology—for example over 80% of maize (Mon 832), soybean (MON-Ø4Ø32-6), cotton, sugar beet and canola planted in the United States are glyphosate-tolerant.

Erucic acid

Erucicerucic acidserusic acid
Canola oil, or canola for short, is a vegetable oil derived from a variety of rapeseed that is low in erucic acid, as opposed to colza oil. Canola was bred from rapeseed cultivars of B. napus and B. rapa at the University of Manitoba, Canada, by Keith Downey and Baldur R. Stefansson in the early 1970s, having then a different nutritional profile than present-day oil in addition to much less erucic acid.
For industrial purposes and production of erucic acid, rapeseed is used; for food purposes a 'low-erucic acid rapeseed' (LEAR) has been developed (canola), which contains fats derived from oleic acid instead of erucic acid.

Alpha-Linolenic acid

α-Linolenic acidlinolenic acidALA
A 2014 review of health effects from consuming plant oils rich in alpha-linolenic acid, including canola, stated that there was moderate benefit for lower risk of cardiovascular diseases, bone fractures, and type-2 diabetes.
Seed oils are the richest sources of α-linolenic acid, notably those of hempseed, chia, perilla, flaxseed (linseed oil), rapeseed (canola), and soybeans.

Colza oil

colzarapeseed oil
Canola oil, or canola for short, is a vegetable oil derived from a variety of rapeseed that is low in erucic acid, as opposed to colza oil.
Canola, a low erucic acid rapeseed oil

Lubricant

lubricantslubricating oillubricating
The oil has many non-food uses and, like soybean oil, is often used interchangeably with non-renewable petroleum-based oils in products, including industrial lubricants, biodiesel, candles, lipsticks, and newspaper inks, depending on the price on the spot market.
Common ones include high oleic canola oil, castor oil, palm oil, sunflower seed oil and rapeseed oil from vegetable, and tall oil from tree sources.

Omega-3 fatty acid

omega-3omega-3 fatty acidsomega 3 fatty acid
Regarding individual components, canola oil is low in saturated fat and contains both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in a ratio of 2:1.
The ratios of omega−6 to omega−3 fatty acids in some common vegetable oils are: canola 2:1, hemp 2–3:1, soybean 7:1, olive 3–13:1, sunflower (no omega−3), flax 1:3, cottonseed (almost no omega−3), peanut (no omega−3), grapeseed oil (almost no omega−3) and corn oil 46:1.

Wheat

cornTriticumdwarf wheat
Canola is Australia's third biggest crop, and is used often by wheat farmers as a break crop to improve soil quality.
This is achieved by 'rotation cropping' (traditionally called the ley system) with leguminous pastures and, in the last decade, including a canola crop in the rotations has boosted wheat yields by a further 25%.