Canon (priest)

canoncanonsCanon Residentiaryhonorary canoncanonryresidentiary canonsecular canonssecular canonCanon Theologiancathedral canon
A canon (from the Latin canonicus, itself derived from the Greek κανονικός, kanonikós, "relating to a rule", "regular") is a member of certain bodies subject to an ecclesiastical rule.wikipedia
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Chapter (religion)

chapterGeneral Chapterchapters
In the Roman Catholic Church, the members of the chapter of a cathedral (cathedral chapter) or of a collegiate church (so called after their chapter) are canons. A canon is a member of the chapter of (for the most part) priests, headed by a dean, which is responsible for administering a cathedral or certain other churches that are styled collegiate churches.
The name derives from the habit of convening monks or canons for the reading of a chapter of the Bible or a heading of the order's rule.

Collegiate church

collegiatecollegiate chapterStiftskirche
In the Roman Catholic Church, the members of the chapter of a cathedral (cathedral chapter) or of a collegiate church (so called after their chapter) are canons. A canon is a member of the chapter of (for the most part) priests, headed by a dean, which is responsible for administering a cathedral or certain other churches that are styled collegiate churches.
In Christianity, a collegiate church is a church where the daily office of worship is maintained by a college of canons: a non-monastic or "secular" community of clergy, organised as a self-governing corporate body, which may be presided over by a dean or provost.

Stift

DamenstiftFrauenstiftLutheran women's convent
Depending on the title of the church, several languages use specific titles, e.g., in German Domherr or Domkapitular in a Dom (i.e., cathedral), Stiftsherr in a prelature that has the status of a Stift (notably under a prince of the Church).
"Das Stift [plural die Stifte]" (literally, the 'donation'), denotes in its original meaning the donated or else acquired fund of landed estates whose revenues are taken to maintain a college and the pertaining church (Stiftskirche, i.e. collegiate church) and its collegiate or capitular canons (Stiftsherr[en]) or canonesses (Stiftsfrau[en]).

Dean (Christianity)

DeanSub-Deandeans
A canon is a member of the chapter of (for the most part) priests, headed by a dean, which is responsible for administering a cathedral or certain other churches that are styled collegiate churches.
Based on the monastic use, it came to mean the head of a chapter of canons of a collegiate church or cathedral church.

Cathedral chapter

chapterDiocesan CanonCanon Chancellor
In the Roman Catholic Church, the members of the chapter of a cathedral (cathedral chapter) or of a collegiate church (so called after their chapter) are canons.
These chapters are made up of canons and other officers, while in the Church of England chapters now includes a number of lay appointees; in the Roman Catholic Church their creation is the purview of the pope.

Clergy

clergymanclericclerics
Originally, a canon was a cleric living with others in a clergy house or, later, in one of the houses within the precinct of or close to a cathedral and conducting his life according to the orders or rules of the church.
Canon, archdeacon, archbishop and the like are specific positions within these orders.

Cathedral

cathedralscathedral churchproto-cathedral
In the Roman Catholic Church, the members of the chapter of a cathedral (cathedral chapter) or of a collegiate church (so called after their chapter) are canons. Originally, a canon was a cleric living with others in a clergy house or, later, in one of the houses within the precinct of or close to a cathedral and conducting his life according to the orders or rules of the church.
One was that of a monastic establishment of some recognised order of monks, often the Benedictines, while the other class was that of a college of clergy, bound by no vows except those of their ordination, but governed by a code of statutes or canons: hence the name of "canon".

Archbasilica of Saint John Lateran

Lateran BasilicaBasilica of St. John LateranArchbasilica of St. John Lateran
Since the reign of King Henry IV, the heads of state of France have been granted by the pope the title of sole honorary canon of Saint John Lateran and Saint Peter's.
The President of the French Republic, currently Emmanuel Macron, is ex officio the "first and only honorary canon" of the archbasilica, a title that the heads of state of France have possessed since King Henry IV.

Prebendary

prebendprebendariesprebends
In some Church of England dioceses, the title Prebendary is used instead of canon when the cleric is involved administratively with a cathedral. The Sovereign was never a canon of St David's, even as a layman (see also The Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion (1562) Article 37), though he or she may occupy the first prebendal stall, which is assigned for the monarch's use.
A prebendary is a member of the Anglican or Roman Catholic clergy, a form of canon with a role in the administration of a cathedral or collegiate church.

Henry Mayr-Harting

Mayr-Harting, HenryH. M. R. E. Mayr-HartingMayr-Harting, H.
Following the death of Peter Hinchliff in 1995 the Regius professorship was held by Henry Mayr-Harting, a Roman Catholic layman, from 1997 until 2003, and was taken up by another lay person, Sarah Foot, in Michaelmas Term 2007.
From 1997 to 2003, he was Regius Professor of Ecclesiastical History at the University of Oxford and a lay canon of Christ Church, Oxford.

Chancellor (ecclesiastical)

chancellorVice-Chancellordiocesan chancellor
The rank of "lay canon" is especially conferred upon diocesan chancellors (the senior legal officer of the diocese, who is usually, though not exclusively, a lay person).

Canons regular

Augustinian Canonscanon regularcanons
Those who embraced this change were known as Augustinians or Canons Regular, whilst those who did not were known as secular canons.
Canons regular are canons (a type of priest) in the Catholic Church who live in community under a rule (regula).

Santa Maria Maggiore

Basilica di Santa Maria MaggioreLiberian BasilicaBasilica of Santa Maria Maggiore
The proto-canon of the papal basilica of Saint Mary Major is the King of Spain, currently Felipe VI.
In addition to the archpriest and his assistant priests, a chapter of canons is resident.

Sarah Foot

Foot, Sarah
Following the death of Peter Hinchliff in 1995 the Regius professorship was held by Henry Mayr-Harting, a Roman Catholic layman, from 1997 until 2003, and was taken up by another lay person, Sarah Foot, in Michaelmas Term 2007.
The professorship is also annexed to a canonry at Christ Church, although the postholder need only be a lay churchperson; and at a special ceremony on 6 October 2007 Foot was installed as residentiary canon of the cathedral.

Van Mildert Professor of Divinity

Professor of DivinityVan Mildert Chair of Divinity
At Durham, the canon professorships are the Van Mildert Professor of Divinity, the holder of which must be an Anglican priest, and the Michael Ramsey Professor of Anglican Studies, who must be Anglican but did not have to be ordained.
The holder of the Van Mildert chair, which is jointly funded by the university and Durham Cathedral, is also a residentiary canon at the cathedral and member of its Chapter, thus one of the requirements of post holder is to be an Anglican priest or a minister in another church in communion with Church of England.

Choir (architecture)

choirchoir stallsquire
The Sovereign was never a canon of St David's, even as a layman (see also The Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion (1562) Article 37), though he or she may occupy the first prebendal stall, which is assigned for the monarch's use.
The architectural details of the choir developed in response to its function as the place where the Divine Office was chanted by the monastic brotherhood or the chapter of canons.

Regius Professor of Ecclesiastical History

Regius Professorship of Ecclesiastical HistoryDr Charles Biggs
One of the motivations for this provision was the fact that, under section 6 of the Ecclesiastical Commissioners Act 1840, the position of Regius Professor of Ecclesiastical History in the University of Oxford was annexed to a Residentiary Canonry of the cathedral, meaning that the Regius professorship could be held only by an Anglican priest.
She is also a lay Canon of Christ Church, Oxford.

John Macquarrie

Macquarrie, J.J. MacquarrieMacquarrie, John
Three other Statutory Professorships, the Regius Professorship of Divinity, Lady Margaret Professorship of Divinity, recently held by the famous Anglican theologian, John Macquarrie, and Regius Professorship of Moral and Pastoral Theology, are annexed to canonries of Christ Church and were until recently held only by Anglican priests.
He was Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity in the University of Oxford and a canon residentiary of Christ Church, Oxford, from 1970 until 1986.

Canoness

Canonesses Regularcanonessessecular canoness
The name corresponds to the male equivalent, a canon.

Dissolution of the Monasteries

dissolutiondissolvedSuppression of the Monasteries
The canonry of St Mary's College, St David's became the property of the Crown on the dissolution of the monasteries.
In addition there remained after the dissolution of the monasteries, over a hundred collegiate churches in England, whose endowments maintained regular choral worship through a corporate body of canons, prebends or priests.

Peter Hinchliff

Peter Bingham Hinchliff
Following the death of Peter Hinchliff in 1995 the Regius professorship was held by Henry Mayr-Harting, a Roman Catholic layman, from 1997 until 2003, and was taken up by another lay person, Sarah Foot, in Michaelmas Term 2007.
In 1964, he was appointed a Canon and Chancellor of Grahamstown Cathedral.

Canons Regular of the Lateran

C.R.L.Lateran CanonsCanonesses Regular of the Lateran
They later left, to be replaced by secular canons in the 17th century.

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
A canon (from the Latin canonicus, itself derived from the Greek κανονικός, kanonikós, "relating to a rule", "regular") is a member of certain bodies subject to an ecclesiastical rule.