Canso Causeway

The Canso Causeway (Cabhsair Chanso in Gaelic) is a 1385 m rock-fill causeway in Nova Scotia, Canada.wikipedia
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Cape Breton Island

Cape BretonCape Breton, Nova ScotiaC'''ape Breton Island
The causeway crosses the Strait of Canso, connecting Cape Breton Island by road to the Nova Scotia peninsula.
Although the island is physically separated from the Nova Scotia peninsula by the Strait of Canso, the 1385 m long rock-fill Canso Causeway connects it to mainland Nova Scotia.

Nova Scotia Highway 105

Highway 105Trunk 5Hwy 105
Its crest thickness is 40 m, carrying the two vehicle traffic lanes of the Trans-Canada Highway, Nova Scotia Highway 104 on the mainland side, and Nova Scotia Highway 105 on the Cape Breton side, as well as the single track mainline of the Cape Breton and Central Nova Scotia Railway.
It runs from the Port Hastings Rotary just east of the Canso Causeway in Port Hastings to the Marine Atlantic ferry terminal in North Sydney, representing a distance of 142 km.

Canso Canal

Cape Breton Island remains circumnavigable as a result of the 24 m wide and 570 m long Canso Canal, which is located at the eastern end of the causeway to allow ship traffic to transit the Strait of Canso.
The Canso Canal is located in the Strait of Canso, on the eastern side of the Canso Causeway, a rock-fill causeway which opened in 1955 to carry a 2-lane highway and a single rail track from Cape Breton Island to mainland Nova Scotia.

Cape Breton and Central Nova Scotia Railway

Cape Breton & Central Nova Scotia RailwayCBNSSydney Subdivision
Its crest thickness is 40 m, carrying the two vehicle traffic lanes of the Trans-Canada Highway, Nova Scotia Highway 104 on the mainland side, and Nova Scotia Highway 105 on the Cape Breton side, as well as the single track mainline of the Cape Breton and Central Nova Scotia Railway.
The main line skirts various inlets of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and crosses the Strait of Canso to Cape Breton Island using the Canso Causeway.

Canso Canal Bridge

The 94 m Canso Canal Bridge is a swing bridge which carries the road and railway line across the canal.
It crosses the Canso Canal at the eastern end of the Canso Causeway.

Causeway

causewayscauswaylandfill
The Canso Causeway (Cabhsair Chanso in Gaelic) is a 1385 m rock-fill causeway in Nova Scotia, Canada.

Strait of Canso

Gut of CansoCanso Strait
The causeway crosses the Strait of Canso, connecting Cape Breton Island by road to the Nova Scotia peninsula.
The strait is crossed by the Canso Causeway for vehicular and rail traffic, opened in 1955.

New Glasgow, Nova Scotia

New GlasgowPriestvilleNew Glasgow, NS
In 1880, the Intercolonial Railway (ICR) was opened between Mulgrave on the Nova Scotia side, west to New Glasgow.
New Glasgow is located on Nova Scotia's north shore, 165 km northeast of Halifax, 110 km west of the Canso Causeway to Cape Breton and 20 km south of the Prince Edward Island ferry at Caribou.

Nova Scotia Highway 104

Highway 104104Highway 104 (TCH)
Its crest thickness is 40 m, carrying the two vehicle traffic lanes of the Trans-Canada Highway, Nova Scotia Highway 104 on the mainland side, and Nova Scotia Highway 105 on the Cape Breton side, as well as the single track mainline of the Cape Breton and Central Nova Scotia Railway.
From the end of the Super 2 section at the western end of Auld's Cove, the highway runs east for 3 km to the western end of the Canso Causeway.

Trans-Canada Highway

Trans Canada HighwayTransCanada HighwayTrans-Canada
Its crest thickness is 40 m, carrying the two vehicle traffic lanes of the Trans-Canada Highway, Nova Scotia Highway 104 on the mainland side, and Nova Scotia Highway 105 on the Cape Breton side, as well as the single track mainline of the Cape Breton and Central Nova Scotia Railway.
Beyond Truro, the highway continues east for to New Glasgow where it meets Highway 106 before continuing to the Canso Causeway which crosses the Strait of Canso to Cape Breton Island near Port Hawkesbury.

Train ferry

train ferriesrail ferrycar ferry
Prior to the construction of the causeway, Cape Breton Island was connected to the mainland by separate railway car and motor vehicle ferries.

Point Tupper, Nova Scotia

Point Tupper
In 1890, the ICR built a line from Point Tupper on the Cape Breton side, east to Sydney.
In 1955, the Canso Causeway opened, closing the railcar ferry service and resulting in a decline in Point Tupper's economy as railway facilities were removed or abandoned.

Mulgrave, Nova Scotia

MulgraveTown of Mulgravecommunity
In 1880, the Intercolonial Railway (ICR) was opened between Mulgrave on the Nova Scotia side, west to New Glasgow.
In August 1955, the community suffered a major economic blow with the opening of the Canso Causeway which immediately removed both road and rail traffic through the town.

Aulds Cove

Auld's CoveAuld's Cove, Nova Scotia
The Canso Causeway was built at a narrow location on the Strait of Canso, about 6.6 km northwest of Port Hawkesbury and Mulgrave, crossing from Cape Porcupine near Auld's Cove on the Nova Scotia side to Port Hastings on the Cape Breton side.
In 1955, the Canso Causeway opened, connecting the southern part of Aulds Cove with Port Hastings by road and railway.

Angus Lewis Macdonald

Angus L. MacdonaldAngus MacdonaldMinister of Naval Affairs
Contracts were awarded, beginning in May 1952 to build approach roads and rail lines for the causeway construction and the project was officially started at a ceremony on September 16, 1952 attended by Minister of Transport Lionel Chevrier and Premier of Nova Scotia Angus L. MacDonald.
Two projects that he pushed especially hard for, the Canso Causeway linking Cape Breton Island to mainland Nova Scotia and a suspension bridge spanning Halifax Harbour were completed after his death.

Gulf of Saint Lawrence

Gulf of St. LawrenceGulf of St LawrenceGulf
Aside from blocking sea ice, the blocking of the Strait of Canso caused significant environmental damage from the enormous changes in the tidal regime of the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence all the way to the mouth of the St. Lawrence River.

Canadian Gaelic

GaelicScottish GaelicCanadian communities with Scottish Gaelic speakers
The Canso Causeway (Cabhsair Chanso in Gaelic) is a 1385 m rock-fill causeway in Nova Scotia, Canada.

Nova Scotia

NSNova Scotia, CanadaNova Scotian
The Canso Causeway (Cabhsair Chanso in Gaelic) is a 1385 m rock-fill causeway in Nova Scotia, Canada.

Nova Scotia peninsula

mainland Nova Scotiapeninsular Nova Scotiamainland portion of southwestern Nova Scotia
The causeway crosses the Strait of Canso, connecting Cape Breton Island by road to the Nova Scotia peninsula.

Swing bridge

swing spanswingswing-span bridge
The 94 m Canso Canal Bridge is a swing bridge which carries the road and railway line across the canal.

Miꞌkmaq language

Mi'kmaqMi'kmaq languageMíkmaq
The word "Canso" is believed to be derived from the Mi'kmaq word kamsok, which means "opposite the lofty cliffs."

Government of Canada

Canadian governmentfederal governmentfederal
On July 2, 2014, it was announced that the Government of Canada would transfer ownership of the causeway to the Nova Scotia provincial government.

Government of Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia GovernmentNova Scotia Department of Natural ResourcesDepartment of Natural Resources
On July 2, 2014, it was announced that the Government of Canada would transfer ownership of the causeway to the Nova Scotia provincial government.

Ferry

ferriespassenger ferryferryboat
Prior to the construction of the causeway, Cape Breton Island was connected to the mainland by separate railway car and motor vehicle ferries.

Intercolonial Railway

Intercolonial Railway of CanadaIntercolonialIRC
In 1880, the Intercolonial Railway (ICR) was opened between Mulgrave on the Nova Scotia side, west to New Glasgow.