Cape Colony

Cape of Good HopeCapeGovernor of the Cape of Good Hopethe CapeColony of the Cape of Good HopeSouth AfricaPrime MinisterGovernor of Cape ColonyCape GovernmentGovernor
The Cape of Good Hope, also known as the Cape Colony (Kaapkolonie), was a British colony in present-day South Africa, named after the Cape of Good Hope.wikipedia
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Union of South Africa

South AfricaUnionSouth African
The Cape of Good Hope then remained in the British Empire, becoming self-governing in 1872, and uniting with three other colonies to form the Union of South Africa in 1910.
It came into being on 31 May 1910 with the unification of the Cape Colony, the Natal Colony, the Transvaal, and the Orange River Colony.

Cape Province

CapeCape of Good HopeProvince of the Cape of Good Hope
It then was renamed the Province of the Cape of Good Hope.
It encompassed the old Cape Colony, and had Cape Town as its capital.

Provinces of South Africa

Provinceprovincesnine provinces
Following the 1994 creation of the present-day South African provinces, the Cape Province was partitioned into the Eastern Cape, Northern Cape, and Western Cape, with smaller parts in North West province.
The Union of South Africa was established in 1910 by combining four British colonies: the Cape Colony, the Natal Colony, the Transvaal Colony and the Orange River Colony.

Cape of Good Hope

Capethe CapeGood Hope
The Cape of Good Hope, also known as the Cape Colony (Kaapkolonie), was a British colony in present-day South Africa, named after the Cape of Good Hope.
It was the name of the early Cape Colony established by the Dutch in 1652, on the Cape Peninsula.

Namibia

🇳🇦Republic of NamibiaNamibian
In the north, the Orange River, also known as the Gariep River, served as the boundary for some time, although some land between the river and the southern boundary of Botswana was later added to it. From 1878, the colony also included the enclave of Walvis Bay and the Penguin Islands, both in what is now Namibia.
In 1878, the Cape of Good Hope, then a British colony, had annexed the port of Walvis Bay and the offshore Penguin Islands; these became an integral part of the new Union of South Africa at its creation in 1910.

Botswana

🇧🇼MotswanaRepublic of Botswana
In the north, the Orange River, also known as the Gariep River, served as the boundary for some time, although some land between the river and the southern boundary of Botswana was later added to it. From 1878, the colony also included the enclave of Walvis Bay and the Penguin Islands, both in what is now Namibia.
During the 1840s and 1850s trade with Cape Colony-based merchants opened up and enabled the Batswana chiefdoms to rebuild.

Port Elizabeth

Port Elizabeth, South AfricaPort Elizabeth, Eastern Capehistory
The British started to settle the eastern border of the colony, with the arrival in Port Elizabeth of the 1820 Settlers.
Port Elizabeth was founded as a town in 1820 to house British settlers as a way of strengthening the border region between the Cape Colony and the Xhosa.

Great Trek

voortrekkervoortrekkersBoer Trek
This was known as the Great Trek, and the migrating Boers settled inland, forming the "Boer republics" of Transvaal and the Orange Free State.
The Great Trek (Die Groot Trek; De Grote Trek) was an eastward migration of Dutch-speaking settlers who travelled by wagon trains from the Cape Colony into the interior of modern South Africa from 1836 onwards, seeking to live beyond the Cape's British colonial administration.

Boer Republics

Boer RepublicrepublicBoer
This was known as the Great Trek, and the migrating Boers settled inland, forming the "Boer republics" of Transvaal and the Orange Free State.
The Boer Republics (sometimes also referred to as Boer states) were independent, self-governed republics in the last half of the nineteenth century, created by the Dutch-speaking inhabitants of the Cape Colony and their descendants, variously named Trekboers, Boers and Voortrekkers in mainly the middle, northern and north eastern and eastern parts of what is now the country of South Africa.

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United KingdomBritishUK
The Cape of Good Hope, also known as the Cape Colony (Kaapkolonie), was a British colony in present-day South Africa, named after the Cape of Good Hope.
Ever since Britain had wrested control of the Cape Colony from the Netherlands during the Napoleonic Wars, it had co-existed with Dutch settlers who had migrated further away from the Cape and created two republics of their own.

Simon's Town

Simon's BaySimons BaySimonstown
The British sent a fleet of nine warships which anchored at Simon's Town and, following the defeat of the Dutch militia at the Battle of Muizenberg, took control of the territory.
The town is named after Simon van der Stel, an early governor of the Cape Colony.

1820 Settlers

British settlers1820 Settlersettlers
The British started to settle the eastern border of the colony, with the arrival in Port Elizabeth of the 1820 Settlers.
The 1820 Settlers were several groups of white British colonists settled by the government of the Kingdom of Great Britain government and the Cape Colony authorities in the Eastern Cape of South Africa in 1820.

Walvis Bay

WalvisbaaiWalfish BayWalvis Bay, Namibia
In the north, the Orange River, also known as the Gariep River, served as the boundary for some time, although some land between the river and the southern boundary of Botswana was later added to it. From 1878, the colony also included the enclave of Walvis Bay and the Penguin Islands, both in what is now Namibia.
They permitted the Cape Colony to complete the annexation of the territory in 1884, following initial steps which had been taken in 1878.

Cape Qualified Franchise

Cape franchisemulti-racial franchisenon-racial system of voting
In 1854, the Cape of Good Hope elected its first parliament, on the basis of the multi-racial Cape Qualified Franchise.
The Cape Qualified Franchise was the system of non-racial franchise that was adhered to in the Cape Colony, and in the Cape Province in the early years of the Union of South Africa.

Eastern Cape Separatist League

British Eastern Cape political allianceBritish ruled Eastern Capeeastern-western division
A period of strong economic growth and social development ensued, and the eastern-western division was largely laid to rest.
The Eastern Province Separatist League was a loose political movement of the 19th century Cape Colony.

Xhosa Wars

frontier wars9th Frontier WarXhosa War
At the same time, the long series of border wars fought against the Xhosa people of the Cape's eastern frontier finally died down when the Xhosa partook in a mass destruction of their own crops and cattle, in the belief that this would cause their spirits to appear and defeat the whites.
The Dutch East India Company, which was responsible for what is referred to as "founding" several urban areas, like towns and cities in already populated areas of the west of South Africa, continually changed the boundaries in the Cape Colony, establishing the Great Fish River as the eastern frontier in 1778.

Cecil Rhodes

RhodesCecil John RhodesCecil
However, the discovery of diamonds around Kimberley and gold in the Transvaal led to a return to instability, particularly because they fuelled the rise to power of the ambitious imperialist Cecil Rhodes.
Cecil John Rhodes (5 July 1853 – 26 March 1902) was a British businessman, mining magnate and politician in southern Africa who served as Prime Minister of the Cape Colony from 1890 to 1896.

Griqualand West

Klipdrift Republic West Griqualand
In 1877, the state expanded by annexing Griqualand West and Griqualand East.
It was inhabited by the Griqua people - a semi-nomadic, Afrikaans-speaking nation of mixed-race origin, who established several states outside the expanding frontier of the Cape Colony.

Kimberley, Northern Cape

KimberleyKimberlyKimberley, South Africa
However, the discovery of diamonds around Kimberley and gold in the Transvaal led to a return to instability, particularly because they fuelled the rise to power of the ambitious imperialist Cecil Rhodes.
The Cape Colony, Transvaal, Orange Free State and the Griqua leader Nicolaas Waterboer all laid claim to the diamond fields.

Second Boer War

Boer WarAnglo-Boer WarSouth African War
In particular, he sought to engineer the conquest of the Transvaal, and although his ill-fated Jameson Raid failed and brought down his government, it led to the Second Boer War and British conquest at the turn of the century.
British military efforts were aided by Cape Colony, the Colony of Natal and some native African allies, and further supported by volunteers from the British Empire, including Southern Africa, the Australian colonies, Canada, India and New Zealand.

Edict of Fontainebleau

revocation of the Edict of Nantesrevocationrevoked
In 1688 they also sponsored the immigration of nearly two hundred French Huguenot refugees who had fled to the Netherlands upon the Edict of Fontainebleau.
They sought asylum in England, the United Provinces, Sweden, Switzerland, Brandenburg-Prussia, Denmark, Protestant states of the Holy Roman Empire, the Cape Colony in Africa, and North America On 17 January 1686, Louis XIV himself claimed that out of a Huguenot population of 800,000 to 900,000, only 1,000 to 1,500 had remained in France.

Francis Dundas

DundasFrancisGeneral Dundas
Francis Dundas (1st time) (acting) (1798–1799)
General Francis Dundas (c.1759 – 15 January 1824) was a British general and acting governor of the Cape Colony between 1798 and 1803.

Orange Free State

Free StateOrange Free State RepublicRepublic of the Orange Free State
This was known as the Great Trek, and the migrating Boers settled inland, forming the "Boer republics" of Transvaal and the Orange Free State.
In 1824 farmers of Dutch, French Huguenot and German descent known as Voortrekkers (later named Boers by the English) walked from the Cape Colony, seeking pasture for their flocks and to escape British governmental oversight, settling in the country.

Jacob Abraham de Mist

Jacob Abraham Uitenhage de Mistde Mist, J.A.U.Uitenhage De Mist
Jacob Abraham Uitenhage de Mist (1803–1804)
He was Head of State of the National Assembly of the Batavian Republic from 17 April 1797 – 1 May 1797 and Commissioner-General of the Cape Colony during the interregnum from 21 February 1803 – 25 September 1804 in accordance with the short-lived Treaty of Amiens.

Jameson Raid

Dr. Jameson's RaidAftermathfailed raid
In particular, he sought to engineer the conquest of the Transvaal, and although his ill-fated Jameson Raid failed and brought down his government, it led to the Second Boer War and British conquest at the turn of the century.
Rather, the territory had four distinct entities: the two British colonies of Cape Colony and Natal; and the two Boer republics of the Orange Free State and the South African Republic, more commonly referred to as the Transvaal.