Cape of Good Hope

Capethe CapeGood Hopethe Cape of Good HopeCape ColonyCape GovernmentCape routeAfrican capeCape [of Good HopeCape of Good Hope 1806
The Cape of Good Hope (Kaap die Goeie Hoop, Kaap de Goede Hoop, Cabo da Boa Esperança ) is a rocky headland on the Atlantic coast of the Cape Peninsula in South Africa.wikipedia
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Cape Peninsula

CapeCape Division (southern Cape Peninsula)the Cape
The Cape of Good Hope (Kaap die Goeie Hoop, Kaap de Goede Hoop, Cabo da Boa Esperança ) is a rocky headland on the Atlantic coast of the Cape Peninsula in South Africa. Geologically, the rocks found at the two capes, and indeed over much of the peninsula, are part of the Cape Supergroup, and are formed of the same type of sandstones as Table Mountain itself.
At the southern end of the peninsula are Cape Point and the Cape of Good Hope.

Portuguese discoveries

PortuguesePortuguese explorerPortuguese explorers
Thus, the first modern rounding of the cape in 1488 by Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias was a milestone in the attempts by the Portuguese to establish direct trade relations with the Far East (although Herodotus mentioned a claim that the Phoenicians had done so far earlier).
Methodical expeditions started in 1419 along West Africa's coast under the sponsorship of prince Henry the Navigator, with Bartolomeu Dias reaching the Cape of Good Hope and entering the Indian Ocean in 1488.

South Africa

🇿🇦South AfricanRepublic of South Africa
The Cape of Good Hope (Kaap die Goeie Hoop, Kaap de Goede Hoop, Cabo da Boa Esperança ) is a rocky headland on the Atlantic coast of the Cape Peninsula in South Africa.
His King, John II, renamed the point Cabo da Boa Esperança, or Cape of Good Hope, as it led to the riches of the East Indies.

Cape Route

sea route to IndiaSouth-east Passagesoutheast passage
As one of the great capes of the South Atlantic Ocean, the Cape of Good Hope has long been of special significance to sailors, many of whom refer to it simply as "the Cape". It is a waypoint on the Cape Route and the clipper route followed by clipper ships to the Far East and Australia, and still followed by several offshore yacht races.
The European-Asian sea route, also known as the sea route to India or the Cape Route is a shipping route from European coast of the Atlantic Ocean to Asia's coast of the Indian Ocean passing by the Cape of Good Hope and Cape Agulhas at the southern edge of Africa.

Great capes

five capesfive great capesfive southernmost capes
As one of the great capes of the South Atlantic Ocean, the Cape of Good Hope has long been of special significance to sailors, many of whom refer to it simply as "the Cape". It is a waypoint on the Cape Route and the clipper route followed by clipper ships to the Far East and Australia, and still followed by several offshore yacht races.
In sailing, the great capes are three major capes of the continents in the Southern Ocean — Africa's Cape of Good Hope, Australia's Cape Leeuwin, and South America's Cape Horn.

Cape Point

That oceanic meeting point fluctuates between Cape Agulhas and Cape Point (about 1.2 km east of the Cape of Good Hope).
The cape is located at -34.35722°N, 18.4975°W, about 2.3 kilometres (1.4 mi) east and a little north of the Cape of Good Hope on the southwest corner.

Table Mountain National Park

Cape of Good Hope Nature ReserveCape PeninsulaNational Park
It is a section of the Table Mountain National Park, within which the cape of the same name, as well as Cape Point, falls. Prior to its incorporation into the national park, this section constituted the Cape Point Nature Reserve.
The park contains two well-known landmarks: Table Mountain, for which the park is named; and the Cape of Good Hope, the most southwestern extremity of Africa.

Benguela Current

BenguelaNamibiaBenguela Niño
The currents of the two oceans meet at the point where the warm-water Agulhas current meets the cold-water Benguela current and turns back on itself.
Eddies from the warm South Indian Ocean Agulhas current along South Africa's east coast do round the Cape of Good Hope from time to time to join the Bengulela current.

Clipper route

Clipper Ship Routegrain trade which delivered wheat and barley to Europe
As one of the great capes of the South Atlantic Ocean, the Cape of Good Hope has long been of special significance to sailors, many of whom refer to it simply as "the Cape". It is a waypoint on the Cape Route and the clipper route followed by clipper ships to the Far East and Australia, and still followed by several offshore yacht races.
Safety would dictate keeping to the north edge of this zone, roughly along the parallel of 40 degrees south; however, the great circle route from the Cape of Good Hope to Australia, curving down to 60 degrees south, is 1000 mi shorter, and would also offer the strongest winds.

Circumnavigation

circumnavigatecircumnavigatedaround the world
This inspired him to repeat the voyage and attempt a circumnavigation of the continent.
After Magellan's death in the Philippines in 1521, Elcano took command of the expedition and continued the journey across the Indian Ocean, round the Cape of Good Hope, north along the Atlantic Ocean, and back to Spain in 1522.

Bartolomeu Dias

DiasBartholomew DiasBarthoulomeu Dias
Thus, the first modern rounding of the cape in 1488 by Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias was a milestone in the attempts by the Portuguese to establish direct trade relations with the Far East (although Herodotus mentioned a claim that the Phoenicians had done so far earlier). In the Early Modern Era, the first European to reach the cape was the Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias on 12 March 1488, who named it the "Cape of Storms" (Cabo das Tormentas). It was later renamed by John II of Portugal as "Cape of Good Hope" (Cabo da Boa Esperança) because of the great optimism engendered by the opening of a sea route to India and the East. The Portuguese government erected two navigational beacons, Dias Cross and Gama Cross, to commemorate Vasco da Gama and Bartolomeu Dias as explorers who as mentioned were the first explorers to reach the cape.
Having rounded the Cape of Good Hope at a considerable distance to the west and southwest, he turned towards the east, and taking advantage of the winds of Antarctica that blow strongly in the South Atlantic, he sailed northeast.

Atlantic Ocean

AtlanticNorth AtlanticAtlantic coast
The Cape of Good Hope (Kaap die Goeie Hoop, Kaap de Goede Hoop, Cabo da Boa Esperança ) is a rocky headland on the Atlantic coast of the Cape Peninsula in South Africa. This misconception was based on the misbelief that the Cape was the dividing point between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans.
Six years later Vasco da Gama reached India under Portuguese flag, by navigating south around the Cape of Good Hope, thus proving that the Atlantic and Indian Oceans are connected.

Cape Agulhas

AgulhasCape Agulhas, South AfricaCape of South Africa
Contemporary geographic knowledge instead states the southernmost point of Africa is Cape Agulhas about 150 km to the east-southeast.
They are closely linked to the geological formations that are exposed in the spectacular cliffs of Table Mountain, Cape Point and the Cape of Good Hope.

Cape Town

Cape Town, South AfricaCapeCape Town, Western Cape
Dutch colonial administrator Jan van Riebeeck established a resupply camp for the Dutch East India Company some 50 km north of the cape in Table Bay on 6 April 1652 and this eventually developed into Cape Town.
Vasco da Gama recorded a sighting of the Cape of Good Hope in 1497.

Dutch East India Company

VOCDutchDutch VOC
Dutch colonial administrator Jan van Riebeeck established a resupply camp for the Dutch East India Company some 50 km north of the cape in Table Bay on 6 April 1652 and this eventually developed into Cape Town.
In 1652, Jan van Riebeeck established an outpost at the Cape of Good Hope (the southwestern tip of Africa, now Cape Town, South Africa) to re-supply VOC ships on their journey to East Asia.

Western Cape

WesternWestern Cape ProvinceWestern Province
Since 1994, it has been broken up into three smaller provinces: the Western Cape, Eastern Cape and Northern Cape; parts of the province were also absorbed into the North West.
The Western Cape Province is roughly L-shaped, extending north and east from the Cape of Good Hope, in the southwestern corner of South Africa.

Indian Ocean

IndianIndoWestern Indian Ocean
This misconception was based on the misbelief that the Cape was the dividing point between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans.
In 1497 Portuguese navigator Vasco da Gama rounded the Cape of Good Hope and became the first European to sail to India (with the help of an Indian sailor) and later the Far East.

Table Bay

Table Bay HarbourTafelbaaiTafelbaai, Western Cape, ZA
Dutch colonial administrator Jan van Riebeeck established a resupply camp for the Dutch East India Company some 50 km north of the cape in Table Bay on 6 April 1652 and this eventually developed into Cape Town.
Table Bay (Afrikaans Tafelbaai) is a natural bay on the Atlantic Ocean overlooked by Cape Town (founded 1652 by Van Riebeeck) and is at the northern end of the Cape Peninsula, which stretches south to the Cape of Good Hope.

Table Mountain

Tafelberghiking trailsTable
Geologically, the rocks found at the two capes, and indeed over much of the peninsula, are part of the Cape Supergroup, and are formed of the same type of sandstones as Table Mountain itself.
Table Mountain is at the northern end of a sandstone mountain range that forms the spine of the Cape Peninsula that terminates approximately 50 km to the south at the Cape of Good Hope and Cape Point.

John II of Portugal

John IIKing John IIJoão II
In the Early Modern Era, the first European to reach the cape was the Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias on 12 March 1488, who named it the "Cape of Storms" (Cabo das Tormentas). It was later renamed by John II of Portugal as "Cape of Good Hope" (Cabo da Boa Esperança) because of the great optimism engendered by the opening of a sea route to India and the East.
1488 – Discovery and passage of the Cape of Good Hope by Bartolomeu Dias in Mossel Bay.

Vasco da Gama

Vasco de GamaCaravel ''BérrioCR Vasco da Gama
The Portuguese government erected two navigational beacons, Dias Cross and Gama Cross, to commemorate Vasco da Gama and Bartolomeu Dias as explorers who as mentioned were the first explorers to reach the cape.
The breakthrough came soon after, when John II's captain Bartolomeu Dias returned from rounding the Cape of Good Hope in 1488, having explored as far as the Fish River (Rio do Infante) in modern-day South Africa and having verified that the unknown coast stretched away to the northeast.

Protea

King ProteasHighveld proteaProtea cryophila
When flowering, however, proteas and ericas attract sunbirds, sugarbirds, and other species in search of nectar.
Proteas attracted the attention of botanists visiting the Cape of Good Hope in the 17th century.

Huguenots

HuguenotFrench HuguenotFrench Huguenots
On 31 December 1687 a community of Huguenots (French Protestants) arrived at the Cape of Good Hope from the Netherlands.
Individual Huguenots settled at the Cape of Good Hope from as early as 1671; the first documented was François Villion (Viljoen).

Simon's Town

Simon's BaySimons BaySimonstown
Two other beacons in Simon's Town provide the intersection.
Britain had just annexed the Dutch colony at the Cape of Good Hope and wanted to establish some defences to ward off possible Dutch or French attacks.

Niccolò de' Conti

Nicolo Conti
Fra Mauro explained that he obtained the information from "a trustworthy source", who traveled with the expedition, possibly the Venetian explorer Niccolò da Conti who happened to be in Calicut, India at the time the expedition left:
Mauro's map discusses the travels of a Zoncho de India, a "junk from India" (likely referring to China or kingdoms in the Nusantaran archipelago, as both was often referred to as India during this period), beyond the Cape of Good Hope into the Atlantic Ocean around 1420, confirming that it was possible to sail around Africa through the south.