Capital of Japan

capitalJapanese capitalcapitalsJapan's capitalsTokyo
The current capital of Japan is Tokyo.wikipedia
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Tokyo

Tokyo, JapanTokyo MetropolisTōkyō
The current capital of Japan is Tokyo. Article 2 of the Capital Area Consolidation Law of 1956 states: "In this Act, the term 'capital area' shall denote a broad region comprising both the territory of the Tokyo Metropolis as well as outlying regions designated by cabinet order."
It has served as the Japanese capital since 1869, its urban area housing the Emperor of Japan and the Japanese government.

Heian-kyō

HeianHeian capitalthe capital
From 794 through 1868, the Emperor lived in Heian-kyō, modern-day Kyoto.
In fact, even after the seat of Imperial power was moved to Tokyo in 1868, since there is no law which makes Tokyo the capital, there is a view that Kyoto legally or officially remains the capital even today.

Asuka, Yamato

AsukaPalace of KiyomiharaAsuka-kyō
Asuka was the Imperial capital of Japan during the Asuka period (538 – 710 AD), which takes its name from this place.

Sakurai, Nara

SakuraiSakurai CityYamato
Sakurai was briefly the capital of Japan during the reign of Emperor Yūryaku.

Tenri, Nara

TenriTenri CityTenri, Japan
Tenri was briefly the capital of Japan during the reign of Emperor Ninken.

Fujiwara-kyō

FujiwaraFujiwara PalaceFujiwara capital
Fujiwara-kyō was the Imperial capital of Japan for sixteen years, between 694 and 710.

Heijō-kyō

Heijo-kyoHeijōHeijokyo
Heijō-kyō, was the Capital of Japan during most of the Nara period, from 710–40 and again from 745–84.

Kyōtanabe, Kyoto

KyōtanabeKyotanabe, KyotoKyotanabe
Kyōtanabe was briefly the capital of Japan during the reign of Emperor Keitai.

Nagaoka-kyō

NagaokaNagaoka PalaceNagaokakyo
Nagaoka-kyō was the capital of Japan from 784 to 794.

Emperor of Japan

EmperorMonarchJapanese Emperor
Traditionally, the home of the Emperor is considered the capital.

Kyoto

Kyoto, JapanKyōtoKyoto, Kyoto
From 794 through 1868, the Emperor lived in Heian-kyō, modern-day Kyoto.

Government of Japan

Japanese governmentgovernmentJapanese
After 1868, the seat of the Government of Japan and the location of the Emperor's home was moved to Tokyo. In 2017, the Government of Japan decided to move the Agency for Cultural Affairs to Kyoto.

Cabinet of Japan

CabinetJapanese CabinetCabinet System
Article 2 of the Capital Area Consolidation Law of 1956 states: "In this Act, the term 'capital area' shall denote a broad region comprising both the territory of the Tokyo Metropolis as well as outlying regions designated by cabinet order."

Gloss (annotation)

glossglossesglossed
Indeed, shuto came into use during the 1860s as a gloss of the English term "capital".

Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology

Ministry of EducationJapanese Ministry of EducationMEXT
The Ministry of Education published a book called "History of the Restoration" in 1941.

Government of Meiji Japan

Meiji governmentnational assemblyJapanese government
A contemporary history textbook states that the Meiji government "moved the capital (shuto) from Kyoto to Tokyo" without using the sento term.

National Diet

DietDiet of JapanJapanese Diet
Officially, the relocation is referred to as "capital functions relocation" instead of "capital relocation", or as "relocation of the Diet and other organizations".

Agency for Cultural Affairs

Agency of Cultural AffairsCultural Affairs AgencyAgency for Cultural Affair
In 2017, the Government of Japan decided to move the Agency for Cultural Affairs to Kyoto.

Emperor Jimmu

JimmuEmperor JinmuJinmu
This list of legendary capitals of Japan begins with the reign of Emperor Jimmu.