Capital of New Zealand

capitalcapital citycapital for that countryNew Zealand's capitalcapital city of New Zealandcentralisedfirst capitalnew capitalNew Zealand capital city
Wellington has been the capital of New Zealand since 1865.wikipedia
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Wellington

Wellington, New ZealandWellington CityWellington City Council
Wellington has been the capital of New Zealand since 1865.
Wellington (Te Whanganui-a-Tara ) is the capital and second most populous urban area of New Zealand, with residents.

New Zealand

NZLNZKiwi
New Zealand's first capital city was Old Russell (Okiato) in 1840–41.
New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, and its most populous city is Auckland.

Auckland

Auckland, New ZealandAuckland New ZealandAuckland, NZ
Auckland was the second capital from 1841 until 1865, when Parliament was permanently moved to Wellington after an argument that persisted for a decade.
After a British colony was established in 1840, William Hobson, then Lieutenant-Governor of New Zealand, chose the area as his new capital.

Okiato

Old RussellRussell
New Zealand's first capital city was Old Russell (Okiato) in 1840–41. Okiato or Old Russell is a small holiday spot in the Bay of Islands, 7 km south of present-day Russell, which was then known as Kororareka.
It was New Zealand's first national capital, for a short time from 1840 to 1841, before the seat of government was moved to Auckland.

William Hobson

Governor HobsonCaptain William HobsonHobson
William Hobson arrived in New Zealand on 29 January 1840, the date now celebrated as the Auckland Anniversary Day.
He also selected the site for a capital in the North Island, which he named Auckland.

Russell, New Zealand

RussellKororārekaKororareka
Okiato or Old Russell is a small holiday spot in the Bay of Islands, 7 km south of present-day Russell, which was then known as Kororareka.
When the Colony of New Zealand was founded in that year, Hobson was reluctant to choose Kororareka as his capital, due to its bad reputation.

Auckland Anniversary Day

Auckland Anniversaryday
William Hobson arrived in New Zealand on 29 January 1840, the date now celebrated as the Auckland Anniversary Day.
In 1841, there was no capacity for arranging anniversary celebrations, as the capital was in the process of being shifted from Okiato to Auckland.

James Reddy Clendon

James Clendon
His second recommendation was Captain James Reddy Clendon's property, as it met the requirements for a good anchorage and immediate availability of land suitable for subdivision and on-sale to settlers.
Felton Mathew, the Surveyor-General, selected Clendon's Okiato property as the most suitable location in the Bay of Islands to establish the capital of the colony.

General Assembly House

What also did not help was that the General Assembly House had been erected in a hurry and was nothing more than a shell, and members called it the "Shedifice".
It was in use by Parliament from 1854 until 1864 during the time that Auckland was the capital of New Zealand.

Old Government House, Auckland

Old Government HouseGovernment HouseGovernment House, Auckland
This building formally became part of the University of Auckland in 1969, is now known as Old Government House, and was registered by the New Zealand Historic Places Trust as a Category I heritage structure in 1983.
The current building was designed by William Mason, and was completed in 1856 as one of the measures taken by Auckland to retain its status as New Zealand's capital.

Ngāti Whātua

Ngati WhatuaNgāti WhatuaTe Popoto
On 18 September, the land (some 3000 acre) had been chosen and an agreement signed with Āpihai Te Kawau and others representing the Ngāti Whātua iwi.
Soon after signing the Treaty, Te Kawau offered land on the Waitematā Harbour to William Hobson, the new Governor of New Zealand, for his new capital.

George Grey

Sir George GreyGovernor GreyGrey
On 23 June 1848, Government House burned down during Sir George Grey's tenure as Governor.
Auckland was made the new capital in March 1841 and by the time Grey was appointed governor in 1845, it had become a commercial centre as well as including the administrative institutions such as the Supreme Court.

Government House, Auckland

Government HouseAuckland Government Housefourth Government House
The party, under the command of Symonds, was to finalise the choice of the future capital, buy the land off the Maori, erect stores and accommodation buildings, and find a site for Government House.
The decision to rebuild was delayed, probably due to the possibility of the capital being moved to Wellington (which is what transpired in 1864).

New Zealand Constitution Act 1852

Constitution ActNew Zealand Constitution ActNew Zealand Constitution Act of 1852
This changed when the New Zealand Constitution Act 1852, an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that granted self-government to the Colony of New Zealand, was received.
The Parliament under the Act met in Auckland, at the time the capital, in May 1854.

Ronald Campbell Gunn

GunnRonald GunnR.C.Gunn
The appointees were Joseph Docker, a member of the New South Wales Legislative Council, Francis Murphy, the Speaker of the Victorian Legislative Assembly, and Ronald Campbell Gunn, a former member of the Tasmanian House of Assembly and the Tasmanian Legislative Council.
In 1864 Gunn was one of the three Australian commissioners tasked by the Government of New Zealand with choosing a new capital for that country.

Francis Murphy (Australian politician)

Francis MurphySir Francis Murphy
The appointees were Joseph Docker, a member of the New South Wales Legislative Council, Francis Murphy, the Speaker of the Victorian Legislative Assembly, and Ronald Campbell Gunn, a former member of the Tasmanian House of Assembly and the Tasmanian Legislative Council.
Murphy was one of the three Australian commissioners tasked by the Government of New Zealand with choosing a new capital for that country.

Joseph Docker

The appointees were Joseph Docker, a member of the New South Wales Legislative Council, Francis Murphy, the Speaker of the Victorian Legislative Assembly, and Ronald Campbell Gunn, a former member of the Tasmanian House of Assembly and the Tasmanian Legislative Council.
Docker was one of the three Australian commissioners tasked by the Government of New Zealand with choosing a new capital for that country.

Bay of Islands

Bay of Islands, New ZealandIpipiri
Okiato or Old Russell is a small holiday spot in the Bay of Islands, 7 km south of present-day Russell, which was then known as Kororareka.

Governor-General of New Zealand

Governor-GeneralGovernorGovernor of New Zealand
On the following day, as Lieutenant-Governor he proclaimed British Sovereignty in New Zealand.

Union Jack

Union FlagRoyal Union FlagBritish flag
30 January 1840 was the day that the Union Jack was flown on the masthead of the Herald, the ship that brought Hobson to the Bay of islands, and that the flag was saluted by guns.

Treaty of Waitangi

Te Tiriti o WaitangiTreatyThe Treaty of Waitangi
A capital city needed to be decided on, and immediately after the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi on 6 February 1840, Hobson sought advice from those who had been living in New Zealand for some time.

Henry Williams (missionary)

Henry WilliamsArchdeacon Henry WilliamsHenry
The missionary Henry Williams recommended the area around the Waitematā Harbour.

Waitematā Harbour

Waitemata HarbourAuckland HarbourWaitematā
The missionary Henry Williams recommended the area around the Waitematā Harbour.

William Cornwallis Symonds

Captain William Symonds
William Cornwallis Symonds agreed with that assessment.

Māori people

MāoriMaoriNew Zealand Māori
A week after the signing of the treaty, seven Māori chiefs from Orakei on the Waitematā Harbour came to see Hobson and invited him to stay amongst them.