Capture of Fort Bute

capturing Fort Buteattacked Fort ButeBattle of Fort ButeFort Butecaptured Fort ButeFort ManchacManchacsurprise attacks and capturethe attack and capturetook the Manchac garrison
The Capture of Fort Bute signalled the opening of Spanish intervention in the American Revolutionary War on the side of France and the United States.wikipedia
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Spain and the American Revolutionary War

Anglo-Spanish WarAmerican Revolutionary WarSpain
The Capture of Fort Bute signalled the opening of Spanish intervention in the American Revolutionary War on the side of France and the United States.
On the mainland, the governor of Spanish Louisiana, Count Bernardo de Gálvez, led a series of successful offensives against the British forts in the Mississippi Valley, first the attack and capture of Fort Bute at Manchac and then forcing the surrender of Baton Rouge, Natchez and Mobile in 1779 and 1780.

Bernardo de Gálvez, 1st Viscount of Galveston

Bernardo de GálvezBernardo de GalvezBernardo de Gálvez y Madrid, Count of Gálvez
Mustering an ad hoc army of Spanish regulars, Acadian militia, and native levies under Gilbert Antoine de St. Maxent, Bernardo de Gálvez, the Governor of Spanish Louisiana stormed and captured the small British frontier post on Bayou Manchac on September 7, 1779.
Gálvez carried out a masterful military campaign and defeated the British colonial forces at Fort Bute, Baton Rouge, and Natchez in 1779.

Gilbert Antoine de St. Maxent

Gilbert Antoine de Saint-Maxent
Mustering an ad hoc army of Spanish regulars, Acadian militia, and native levies under Gilbert Antoine de St. Maxent, Bernardo de Gálvez, the Governor of Spanish Louisiana stormed and captured the small British frontier post on Bayou Manchac on September 7, 1779.
During the American Revolutionary War Spain sided with the French and United States against the British and St. Maxent was placed in charge of the militia (but not Spanish regulars), which saw action in the Gulf Coast campaign, including the Capture of Fort Bute, the Battle of Baton Rouge (1779) (which resulted in the capture of both Fort New Richmond and Fort Panmure (future Natchez, Mississippi), the Battle of Fort Charlotte (1780), and ultimately the Siege of Pensacola (1781).

Military history of the Acadians

Acadian militiaAcadia militiaAcadians
Mustering an ad hoc army of Spanish regulars, Acadian militia, and native levies under Gilbert Antoine de St. Maxent, Bernardo de Gálvez, the Governor of Spanish Louisiana stormed and captured the small British frontier post on Bayou Manchac on September 7, 1779.
The Capture of Fort Bute signalled the opening of Spanish intervention in the American Revolutionary War on the side of France and the United States.

Fort Bute

Fort Bute (30.32361°N, -91.13694°W) was located on Bayou Manchac, about 115 mi up the Mississippi River from New Orleans, on the far western border of British West Florida.
At dawn on September 7, 1779 the Spanish captured Fort Bute with no casualties.

Cajuns

CajunAcadiansCajun American
As they marched upriver, the force grew by another 600 men, from Indians to Acadians.
"Galvez leaves New Orleans with an army of Spanish regulars and the Louisiana militia made up of 600 Cajun volunteers and captures the British strongholds of Fort Bute at Bayou Manchac, across from the Acadian settlement at St. Gabriel. On September 7, 1779 Galvez attacked Fort Bute and then on September 21, 1779 attacked and captured Baton Rouge."

Battle of Baton Rouge (1779)

Battle of Baton RougeBaton RougeFort New Richmond
Gálvez remained at Fort Bute for six days, giving his men time to rest, before moving on to Baton Rouge, which fell after a short siege on September 21.
At dawn on September 7, this force attacked Fort Bute, a decaying relic of the French and Indian War that was defended by a small force.

Gulf Coast campaign

military campaign along the Gulf Coastconquest of British West FloridaSpanish conquest of West Florida
At dawn on 7 September this force attacked Fort Bute, a decaying relic of the French and Indian War that was defended by a token force.

Oliver Pollock

The force departing New Orleans consisted of 520 regulars, of whom about two-thirds were recent recruits, 60 militiamen, 80 free men of color, and ten American volunteers headed by Oliver Pollock.
Gálvez and the Spanish troops swept through the future states of Louisiana, Alabama, and Florida, defeating the British with the capture of Fort Bute and campaigning through the victorious siege of Pensacola in 1781.

Fort New Richmond

Fort San Carlos
The fort was captured on September 21, 1779, when Bernardo de Gálvez, the colonial Governor of Spanish Louisiana, after capturing Fort Bute led his force of approximately 1,000 men (reduced by the hardships of the march from New Orleans) against Baton Rouge.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
The Capture of Fort Bute signalled the opening of Spanish intervention in the American Revolutionary War on the side of France and the United States.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The Capture of Fort Bute signalled the opening of Spanish intervention in the American Revolutionary War on the side of France and the United States.

Ad hoc

ad-hocadhocAd hoc query
Mustering an ad hoc army of Spanish regulars, Acadian militia, and native levies under Gilbert Antoine de St. Maxent, Bernardo de Gálvez, the Governor of Spanish Louisiana stormed and captured the small British frontier post on Bayou Manchac on September 7, 1779.

List of colonial governors of Louisiana

Colonial Governor of LouisianaGovernor of LouisianaFrench Governor of Louisiana
Mustering an ad hoc army of Spanish regulars, Acadian militia, and native levies under Gilbert Antoine de St. Maxent, Bernardo de Gálvez, the Governor of Spanish Louisiana stormed and captured the small British frontier post on Bayou Manchac on September 7, 1779.

Louisiana (New Spain)

Spanish LouisianaLouisianaSpanish
Mustering an ad hoc army of Spanish regulars, Acadian militia, and native levies under Gilbert Antoine de St. Maxent, Bernardo de Gálvez, the Governor of Spanish Louisiana stormed and captured the small British frontier post on Bayou Manchac on September 7, 1779.

Bayou Manchac

Iberville RiverManchacqIberville
Mustering an ad hoc army of Spanish regulars, Acadian militia, and native levies under Gilbert Antoine de St. Maxent, Bernardo de Gálvez, the Governor of Spanish Louisiana stormed and captured the small British frontier post on Bayou Manchac on September 7, 1779.

Spain

SpanishESPKingdom of Spain
Spain officially entered the American Revolutionary War on May 8, 1779, with a formal declaration of war by King Charles III.

Declaration of war

declared wardeclare wardeclarations of war
Spain officially entered the American Revolutionary War on May 8, 1779, with a formal declaration of war by King Charles III.

Charles III of Spain

Charles IIICarlos IIIKing Carlos III
Spain officially entered the American Revolutionary War on May 8, 1779, with a formal declaration of war by King Charles III.

Pensacola, Florida

PensacolaPensacola, FLCity of Pensacola
Gálvez, who had been planning for the possibility of war since April, intercepted communications from the British at Pensacola indicating that the British were planning a surprise attack on New Orleans; he decided to launch his own attack first.

New Orleans

New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans, LAOrleans Parish
Gálvez, who had been planning for the possibility of war since April, intercepted communications from the British at Pensacola indicating that the British were planning a surprise attack on New Orleans; he decided to launch his own attack first.

Mississippi River

MississippiMississippi ValleyMississippi Basin
Fort Bute (30.32361°N, -91.13694°W) was located on Bayou Manchac, about 115 mi up the Mississippi River from New Orleans, on the far western border of British West Florida.

West Florida

Florida OccidentalColony of West FloridaWestern Florida
Fort Bute (30.32361°N, -91.13694°W) was located on Bayou Manchac, about 115 mi up the Mississippi River from New Orleans, on the far western border of British West Florida.

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Baton RougeBaton Rouge, LABâton Rouge
Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Dickson was charged with the defense of the Baton Rouge district, which included Fort Bute, Baton Rouge, and Fort Panmure (modern Natchez, Mississippi).

Fort Rosalie

Fort PanmureNatchez
Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Dickson was charged with the defense of the Baton Rouge district, which included Fort Bute, Baton Rouge, and Fort Panmure (modern Natchez, Mississippi).