Carcinoma in situ

carcinoma ''in situcarcinoma in-situin situprecancercarcinoma-in-situCISin situ neoplasmspre-cancerpre-cancerousprecancerous
Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is a group of abnormal cells.wikipedia
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Neoplasm

tumortumorstumour
While they are a form of neoplasm, there is disagreement over whether CIS should be classified as cancer.
ICD-10 classifies neoplasms into four main groups: benign neoplasms, in situ neoplasms, malignant neoplasms, and neoplasms of uncertain or unknown behavior.

Precancerous condition

premalignantprecancerouspre-malignant
The term "pre-cancer" has also been used.
Sometimes the term "precancer" is also used for carcinoma in situ, which is a noninvasive cancer that has not progressed to an aggressive, invasive stage.

TNM staging system

TNMTNM stagingTNM classification
In the TNM classification, carcinoma in situ is reported as TisN0M0 (stage 0).
carcinoma in situ is categorized stage 0; often tumors localized to the organ of origin are staged as I or II depending on the extent, locally extensive spread, to regional nodes are staged as III, and those with distant metastasis staged as stage IV.

High-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia

prostatic intraepithelial neoplasiahigh-grade PINPIN
It is considered to be a pre-malignancy, or carcinoma in situ, of the prostatic glands.

Cancer

cancersmalignanciescancerous
While they are a form of neoplasm, there is disagreement over whether CIS should be classified as cancer.
About half of patients receiving treatment for invasive cancer (excluding carcinoma in situ and non-melanoma skin cancers) die from that cancer or its treatment.

Cervical cancer

cervicalcervical carcinomacervix
The World Health Organization classification system was descriptive of the lesions, naming them mild, moderate, or severe dysplasia or carcinoma in situ (CIS).

Adenocarcinoma in situ of the lung

bronchioloalveolar carcinomaalveolar cell carcinomain situ adenocarcinoma of the lung
AIS is not considered to be an invasive tumor by pathologists, but as one form of carcinoma in situ (CIS).

Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

cervical dysplasiapreneoplastic lesions preneoplastic lesions
Dysplasia of the uterine cervix is removed by excision (cutting it out) or by burning with a laser.

Lobular carcinoma in situ

LCISlobular carcinoma ''in situ
Exceptions include CIS of the colon (polyps), the bladder (preinvasive papillary cancer), or the breast (ductal carcinoma in situ or lobular carcinoma in situ).

Squamous cell carcinoma

squamous-cell carcinomasquamous carcinomasquamous cell cancer
This condition is called squamous cell carcinoma in situ, and it is diagnosed when the tumor has not yet penetrated the basement membrane or other delimiting structure to invade adjacent tissues.

Cancer staging

stagestagingstage IV
In the TNM classification, carcinoma in situ is reported as TisN0M0 (stage 0).

Bladder cancer

bladderbladder carcinomacancer of the bladder
Some forms of CIS (e.g., colon polyps and polypoid tumours of the bladder) can be removed using an endoscope, without conventional surgical resection.
Unlike papillary lesion, which grow into the bladder cavity and are readily visible, carcinoma in situ lesion are flat and obscure.

Squamous cell skin cancer

Bowen's diseaseErythroplasia of Queyratsquamous cell carcinoma
For example, carcinoma in situ of the skin, also called Bowen's disease, is the accumulation of dysplastic epidermal cells within the epidermis only, that has failed to penetrate into the deeper dermis.

Ductal carcinoma in situ

DCISductal carcinoma ''in situBreast cancer in situ
Exceptions include CIS of the colon (polyps), the bladder (preinvasive papillary cancer), or the breast (ductal carcinoma in situ or lobular carcinoma in situ).

Malignancy

Metastasis

metastaticmetastasesmetastasized
Carcinoma in situ is, by definition, a localized phenomenon, with no potential for metastasis unless it progresses into cancer.

Adenoma

adenomasAdenomatosisadenomatous
Some forms of CIS (e.g., colon polyps and polypoid tumours of the bladder) can be removed using an endoscope, without conventional surgical resection.

Endoscope

endoscopicendoscopicallyendoscopy
Some forms of CIS (e.g., colon polyps and polypoid tumours of the bladder) can be removed using an endoscope, without conventional surgical resection.

Segmental resection

resectionsurgical resectionresect
Some forms of CIS (e.g., colon polyps and polypoid tumours of the bladder) can be removed using an endoscope, without conventional surgical resection.