Cardinal de Richelieu by Philippe de Champaigne, 1642 (Musée des Beaux-Arts de Strasbourg)
Portrait of Jules Mazarin by Pierre Mignard (1658)
The coat of arms of a cardinal (who is a bishop) is indicated by a red galero (wide-brimmed hat) with 15 tassels on each side (the motto and escutcheon are proper to the individual cardinal).
The young Louis XIII; only a figurehead during his early reign; power actually rested with his mother, Marie de' Medici.
Mazarin carrying the peace agreement to the armies at Casale, crying "Peace! Peace!" (18th century engraving)
Cardinal Richelieu, chief minister of France
Cardinal Innitzer, Archbishop of Vienna and Cardinal-Priest of San Crisogono
Jean Warin, Cardinal de Richelieu 1622 (obverse), 1631
Mazarin as a papal envoy in Paris (1632)
Choir dress of a cardinal
Cardinal Richelieu by Robert Nanteuil
Portrait of Cardinal Jules Mazarin by Simon Vouet (before 1649, private collection)
Cardinal Sodano (1927-2022), Dean Emeritus of the college
The Battle of Lens
Anne of Austria with her children Louis XIV of France and Philippe, Duke of Orléans (unknown artist)
Cardinal-priest Thomas Wolsey
Cardinal Mazarin (depicted here in 1660, age 58) succeeded Richelieu in office.
An anti-Mazarin cartoon from the Fronde (about 1650). The caption reads, "Despite Mazarin, the frondeurs assure the safety of the state."
Coat of arms of Cardinal Martino, current Cardinal Protodeacon
Painting by Philippe de Champaigne showing Cardinal Richelieu on his deathbed
Louis the Prince de Condé, leader of the second Fronde
Reginald Pole was a cardinal for 18 years before he was ordained a priest.
Triple Portrait of Cardinal de Richelieu, by Philippe de Champaigne (ca 1642)
Battle between the Fronde forces of the Prince de Conde and the army loyal to Anne of Austria and Mazarin
A Cardinal in Profile, 1880, by Jehan Georges Vibert (Morgan Library and Museum, New York City)
Bust of Cardinal Richelieu by Gianlorenzo Bernini
Nicolas Fouquet, the Superintendent of Finances
alt=Théodore Adrien Cardinal  Sarr with a ferraiolo, and wearing a red cassock, but not the rest of the choir dress.|Cardinal Sarr with a ferraiolo and wearing a red cassock, but not the rest of the choir dress.
The Richelieu Bacchus continued to be admired by neoclassical artists, (Louvre Museum)
Jean-Baptiste Colbert, the enemy and successor of Fouquet
alt=Cardinals Walter Kasper (left) and Godfried Danneels (right) wearing their choir dress: scarlet (red) cassock, white rochet trimmed with lace, scarlet mozetta, scarlet biretta (over the usual scarlet zucchetto), and pectoral cross on cord.|Cardinals Walter Kasper (left) and Godfried Danneels (right) wearing their choir dress: scarlet (red) cassock, white rochet trimmed with lace, scarlet mozetta, scarlet biretta (over the usual scarlet zucchetto), and pectoral cross on cord.
Portrait by Philippe de Champaigne, c. 1633-1640
The wedding of Louis XIV and Maria Theresa. Mazarin is at their right.
alt=Tarcisio Cardinal Bertone in dress for hot tropical countries (white cassock with scarlet piping and buttons).|Cardinal Bertone in dress for hot tropical countries (white cassock with scarlet piping and buttons).
The Parc de Richelieu at Richelieu, Indre-et-Loire
Tomb of Mazarin in the Institut de France
Henri Motte's depiction of Cardinal Richelieu at the Siege of La Rochelle.
Mazarin seated within the Gallery of his Palace (1659)
Letter of Cardinal Richelieu to Claude de Razilly asking him to do everything in his power to relieve Ré Island in the Siege of Saint-Martin-de-Ré, July 1627.
Portrait of Baldassare Castiglione, by Raphael, purchased by Mazarin from Richelieu
On the "Day of the Dupes" in 1630, it appeared that Marie de Médicis had secured Richelieu's dismissal. Richelieu, however, survived the scheme, and Marie was exiled as a result.
Torelli's set design for Act 5 of Pierre Corneille's Andromède as performed at the Petit-Bourbon in 1650
Carved coat of arms of Mazarin on a bookcase in the Bibliothèque Mazarine in Paris
Laura Mancini, Duchess of Mercœur
Anne Marie Martinozzi, Princess of Conti
Olympia Mancini, by Pierre Mignard
Laura Martinozzi, Duchess of Modena
Marie Mancini, whom Louis XIV wished to marry
Hortense Mancini, Duchess Mazarin.
Marie Anne Mancini, who became Duchess of Bouillon.
Nicolas Fouquet, the Superintendent of Finances
Marie Mancini, whom Louis XIV wished to marry

Cardinal Jules Mazarin (, also, , ; 14 July 1602 – 9 March 1661), born Giulio Raimondo Mazzarino or Mazarini, was an Italian cardinal, diplomat, and politician who served as the chief minister to the kings of France Louis XIII and Louis XIV from 1642 until his death in 1661.

- Cardinal Mazarin

He was also known as l'Éminence rouge, or "the Red Eminence", a term derived from the title "Eminence" applied to cardinals, and the red robes they customarily wear.

- Cardinal Richelieu

After serving as a papal diplomat for Pope Urban VIII, Mazarin offered his diplomatic services to Cardinal Richelieu and moved to Paris in 1640.

- Cardinal Mazarin

He retained this office until his death in 1642, when he was succeeded by Cardinal Mazarin, whose career he had fostered.

- Cardinal Richelieu

Cardinal Richelieu's power was so great that he was for many years effectively the ruler of France.

- Cardinal (Catholic Church)

Richelieu's successor was also a cardinal, Jules Mazarin.

- Cardinal (Catholic Church)
Cardinal de Richelieu by Philippe de Champaigne, 1642 (Musée des Beaux-Arts de Strasbourg)

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